Jay Nixon

(via flickr/ensign_beedrill)

A Missouri state House committee has agreed to hold hearings on reports that some of Gov. Jay Nixon's department heads created hostile work environments for their employees.

The announcement from Republican House speaker Tim Jones of Eureka came the same week that Gracia Backer, the former head of the state's Division of Employment Security, alleged that she was fired from her job for raising concerns about discrimination in her department.

(via Flickr/katerha)

Missouri has awarded an additional $4.2 million in grants to improve facilities at six child care centers around the state.

Gov. Jay Nixon is touting the funding through the Department of Economic Development as part of what he calls the "Missouri Start Smart" initiative to expand access to early childhood education.

The money will help expand three preschool facilities in the St. Louis area, one in the Macon area in northern Missouri, and one each in the Calhoun and Polo school districts in western Missouri:

(via Flickr/clementine gallot)

Missouri Governor Jay Nixon (D) has reversed course on a proposed rule change that would have cut food stamp eligibility for unemployed adults without children.

Nixon had initially cited concerns over the amount of federal funds available for state-run food assistance programs, but now says there's more certainty due to the end of the partial government shutdown last week.  Fellow Democrat and State Senator Jamilah Nasheed of St. Louis says she's elated by the governor's reversal.

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

Two days after pledging to significantly raise Missouri's Higher Education budget next year, Governor Jay Nixon (D) on Wednesday pledged to do the same for the state's public schools.

Nixon told K-12 school leaders in Jefferson City that the state's AAA credit rating and improving economy will enable his administration to spend more money on educating Missouri's children.

(UPI, Bill Greenblatt)

Missouri Governor Jay Nixon (D) says he will attend the World Series between the St. Louis Cardinals and Boston Red Sox, though he hasn't disclosed which game he plans to attend.

He told reporters in Jefferson City on Monday that he's in the process of negotiating a bet with Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick (D).

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri Governor Jay Nixon (D) says next year he's going to propose a Higher Education budget that's "substantially" higher that it's been in recent years.

Nixon made that promise Monday to a group of Higher Education officials meeting in Jefferson City, though he won't say yet how high his proposed budget hike will be.  He also suggested that his higher budget proposal could be rendered moot if this year's failed income tax cut legislation is revived next year.

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

A group of protesters Tuesday afternoon called on Missouri U.S. Congressman Blaine Luetkemeyer (R) to vote to end the federal government shutdown that began October first.

The 40 demonstrators picketed outside Luetkemeyer's Jefferson City office and also delivered a so-called "cease and desist order" to members of his staff.    Allison Dreith is with the Missouri Progressive Vote Coalition, the group that sponsored the demonstration.

St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri has joined a growing list of states looking to reopen national parks within their borders as the federal government shutdown continues.

In a statement released late Friday, Governor Jay Nixon (D) says he's directed members of his staff to put together a proposal for reopening National Park Service sites in Missouri, including the Gateway Arch in St. Louis and the Ozark National Scenic Riverways Park.  He calls the two sites "national treasures" that draw millions of tourists every year and "generate significant economic activity."

(Veronique LaCapra/St. Louis Public Radio)

On Friday, Governor Jay Nixon postponed the execution of an inmate that was set for later this month. That execution was going to be carried out using propofol, a common anesthetic that has never been used in a lethal injection before. So why the change in plans?

Missouri Auditor Tom Schweich appears on St. Louis Public Radio's 'Politically Speaking' podcast in 2013.
Jason Rosenbaum / St. Louis Beacon

Every week, St. Louis Public Radio’s Chris McDaniel joins the St. Louis Beacon’s Jo Mannies and Jason Rosenbaum to talk about the week’s politics.

(via Flickr/David_Shane)

Missouri auditor Tom Schweich had no authority to challenge Gov. Jay Nixon's decision to withhold about $170 million from the budget for fiscal year 2012 before the spending plan actually went into effect.

That was the ruling today from six of the justices on the Missouri Supreme Court. Judge Paul Wilson did not participate.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Gov. Jay Nixon says a voter-approved ballot initiative limits what his administration can do to promote the federal health insurance exchange.

But unlike Lt. Gov. Peter Kinder, the Democratic chief executive says the advent of the exchanges is a positive development for individuals looking for health insurance.

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

Businesses that want to expand to new international markets or start exporting their goods for the first time are getting a boost from Gov. Jay Nixon's administration.

Nixon announced his "Export Missouri" initiative in St. Louis on Friday, at a luncheon honoring 20 years of the World Trade Center - St. Louis. The new program uses $2.3 million in state funding to open new trade offices in Canada and southeast Asia; offset the costs to companies of international trade shows or trade missions; and new online resources.

Screenshot from the White House livestream.

 

 Speaking outside of Kansas City Friday, President Barack Obama called out House Republicans for their vote on a plan to avoid a partial government shutdown. Obama was in Ford Motor's new stamping plant in Liberty, which is located near the company's assembly in Claycomo.

The House voted to keep the federal government running beyond the end of the month. The catch? It also defunds the Affordable Care Act.

In Missouri, the vote fell across party lines with all GOP members voting for it.

Bill Greenblatt/UPI

Governor Jay Nixon (D) has released just over half of the $400 million he withheld earlier this year from Missouri's current state budget.

In a press release, he announced that $215 million will be divvied up among K-12 schools, higher education, mental health programs and specific programs for training health care professionals in southwest Missouri.  Nixon released the money Thursday, one day after Republican lawmakers failed to override his veto of a controversial tax cut bill.

Educators Make Final Push Against Tax Cut Bill

Sep 9, 2013
(Chris McDaniel/St. Louis Public Radio)

A group of educators criticized a tax cut bill today that could severely hinder schools in Missouri. They maintained that the bill, which Governor Jay Nixon vetoed in June, would cut revenue for the state by $800 million and result in reduced funding for education.

The superintendents from the Northwest, Washington and Hazelwood School Districts argued that the bill would have detrimental effects on their districts. Hazelwood superintendent Grayling Tobias said the bill could cause budget cuts for equipment and extracurricular activities, larger class sizes and fewer teachers.

(Flickr/Cast a Line)

A Missouri teachers union says it is spending at least $100,000 on commercials urging state lawmakers to uphold the governor's veto of an income tax cut.

The Missouri chapter of the National Education Association says the TV and radio spots began running Tuesday and will continue for a week. The ads assert the tax cut would benefit "corporate special interests" while "stealing money from our schools."

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

The lead sponsor of a Missouri income tax cut wants Gov. Jay Nixon to call a special session so lawmakers can address some of the governor's concerns about the bill (HB253).

Republican House member T. J. Berry, of Kearney, said Thursday that he wants Nixon to call a special session to run concurrently with the veto session scheduled to start Sept. 11.

Nixon vetoed 29 bills this year, including Berry's bill cutting income taxes. Republican legislative leaders hope to override the veto.

(Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio)

Governor Jay Nixon is taking action against a radio ad in which Texas Governor Rick Perry encourages Missouri businesses to leave for his state.

Nixon’s campaign committee is running an ad that defends Missouri as a better place to do business than Texas on St. Louis radio station KTRS. The station previously refused to run Perry's ad. 

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

While Governor Jay Nixon (D) continues touring Missouri to oppose efforts to override his veto of tax cut legislation, a group of business officials and political activists are trying to rally support for the override effort.

Office of TX Gov. Rick Perry

Missouri's Democratic Secretary of State is criticizing the Republican Governor of Texas for an ad campaign encouraging Missouri-based companies to relocate to the Lone Star State.

In one ad, Governor Rick Perry criticizes Missouri Democratic Governor Jay Nixon's veto of House Bill 253, that would've cut income tax rates for individuals and businesses.

Chris McDaniel, St. Louis Public Radio.

Updated 8-21-13 4:01 p.m.

In St. Louis Wednesday, Gov. Jay Nixon sharply criticized a bill he vetoed that would allow juvenile sexual offenders to be removed from the sex offender registry. The Democratic Governor said overriding his veto would undermine public safety and weaken victims' rights.

He stood next to a gallery of mugshots and distributed information on several individuals who could be removed from the website if the bill passes.

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

Sedalia was swarming with politicians Thursday, as office holders from both parties descended on the Missouri State Fair.

Nearly a thousand people, politicians and citizens alike, dined on country ham, eggs and peaches at the Governor's Ham Breakfast.  Governor Jay Nixon began his annual speech by condemning the incident in which a rodeo clown wore a President Obama mask this weekend.

"What has always united us is (that) no matter what part of the state you're from, or who you voted for, we treat people with respect," Nixon told the applauding crowd.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: United for Missouri, one of the conservative groups backing the tax-cut bill, --HB253 -- vetoed by Gov. Jay Nixon, is posting a new video today on various social media sites. The video asserts the governor has a track record of misleading the public.

Entitled  “Nixon’s Deceptions,“ the video cites controversies during Nixon’s administration, beginning with the 2009 flap over closing some state beaches because of E. coli bacteria.

via Kristi Luther and Tim Bommel, Mo. House Communications.

The income tax bill that would eventually reduce income tax rates by about a half of a percent is likely to not be brought up in veto session next month, according to Missouri House Speaker Tim Jones (R-Eureka).

Appearing on St. Louis Public Radio's and the St. Louis Beacon's Politically Speaking podcast, Jones said he currently doesn't have the votes necessary for an override of the governor's veto.

Krisi Luther, St. Louis Public Radio.

Credit rating agencies warn that allowing a Missouri income tax bill to become law could have a negative impact on the state's credit rating.

“We believe that if the Missouri legislature overrides the governor’s veto and enacts the legislation, and the federal government passes the Marketplace Fairness Act, it has the potential to result in a significant financial impact to the state, despite requirements for the maintenance of a balanced budget," Standard & Poor's wrote.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon’s competitive streak is legendary, from the basketball court (until his knees gave out) to the political arena, where for decades many a fellow Democrat has kept a wary eye on Nixon’s unabashed ambition.

Marshall Griffin, KWMU

If the income tax cut bill becomes law in September, millions will be cut from Missouri's public education system, according to Governor Jay Nixon.

It's a common refrain from the Democrat: "You can either be for public education or for House Bill 253, but you can't be both," he told a crowd of business leaders last week.

This week, Nixon released numbers to back up his claim.

Chris McDaniel, St. Louis Public Radio.

Expect to see a lot of ads leading up to September, paid for largely by one man. Libertarian Rex Sinquefield has given nearly $2.4 million to groups backing a possible cut to Missouri's income tax.

In response, Democratic Governor Jay Nixon has gone on the offensive, attacking the income tax bill and defending his veto.

Speaking in St. Louis to the Regional Chamber, Nixon said it is a "fiscally irresponsible experiment that didn't work in Kansas and won't work here."

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Missouri Attorney General Chris Koster is keeping up his financial momentum for his acknowledged bid for governor in 2016. His latest campaign-finance report shows that he already has banked $781,410 – with two-thirds of it raised just since April 1.

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