Lewis Reed

Today: St. Louis Mayoral Primary Forum

Feb 11, 2013
(via Flickr/Richie Diesterheft)

The three candidates for the Democratic nomination for St. Louis mayor will take part in a one-hour town hall forum today. 

St. Louis Public Radio will air the forum, which is the second gathering of the candidates ahead of the March 5th primary election.

In liberal territory like St. Louis, the winner of the Democratic primary in March immediately becomes the presumptive favorite to win the general election on April 2nd.

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

Today on "St. Louis on the Air," we announced that we'll be hosting the St. Louis Mayoral Primary Forum.  Here are some of the details:

Mayoral Debate Contentious In Downtown Forum

Jan 30, 2013
Chris McDaniel, St. Louis Public Radio

At a mayoral debate showcasing the three Democrats vying for the position in the March 5 primary, challenger and Board of Alderman President Lewis Reed wasted no time before going after his opponent.

Crime was by far the most contentious issue in the forum that filled two overflow rooms and was standing room only. Several times at the debate, Reed interrupted incumbent Mayor Francis Slay when he was talking about the city's lowering crime rate.

(via City of St. Louis websites)

Last week, St. Louis Public Radio took a look at how much money the mayoral candidates have amassed, and where that money is coming from. Today we're looking at how that money is being spent.

(via City of St. Louis websites)

Updated 3:43 with Mayor Slay's more recent ad (that is televised).

A little more than a month away from the Democratic primary, challenger Lewis Reed is losing the fundraising battle miserably.

According to Tuesday's campaign finance filings, incumbent Mayor Francis Slay spent nearly a million dollars in the month of January in his campaign to be re-elected.

(via City of St. Louis websites)

St. Louis Mayoral candidate Lewis Reed is accusing Mayor Francis Slay of campaigning at the expense of taxpayers.

Reed, President of the Board of Aldermen, alleges Slay is holding meetings with city employees to campaign for votes while they are on the clock. Glenn Burleigh, Reed’s campaign manager, claims it’s a coordinated effort aimed at multiple departments.

“Telling folks on taxpayer dime: that’s what’s important here," Burleigh said. "These are trash collectors, that instead of picking up trash, were listening to the mayor.”

(via City of St. Louis websites)

Tensions between the two main Democrats running for mayor of St. Louis were on broad display today during a dispute over who should negotiate contracts with St. Louis city employees.

(via City of St. Louis websites)

St. Louis's Democratic battle between incumbent Mayor Francis Slay and Board of Aldermen President Lewis Reed is now official -- both candidates filed for the March primary this morning.

Slay has never lost a race, and he's taking this challenge seriously. In fact, Slay says he's had paid employees and volunteers standing in line to hold his spot for filing since Sept. 24.

Slay says he wants another term in order to continue improving education and public safety in the city, and points to the recent passage of local control of the police department.

(via City of St. Louis websites)

Updated to note that Slay filed multiple reports, and thus raised and spent more than quarterly report reflected.

The latest quarterly reports are in for the 2013 mayoral primary in the city of St. Louis, and incumbent Mayor Francis Slay continues to hold a huge fundraising advantage over challenger Lewis Reed, the Board of Aldermen president.

(via City of St. Louis websites)

Not many people who watch city politics were surprised when Board of Alderman president Lewis Reed announced that he will challenge Mayor Francis Slay in next year’s Democratic primary in April.

Reed officially threw his hat into the ring on Wednesday at Sqwires in Lafayette Square, part of his ward before he ran for board president.

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

Updated at 1:50 with comments from Mayor Slay.

The long-rumored Democratic rumble for mayor of St. Louis is on. 

Board of Aldermen president Lewis Reed officially threw his hat into the ring today in a press conference at Sqwires in Lafayette Square, part of his ward before he ran for board president.

This campaign is a "mission of change," Reed told his supporters, calling Slay an ineffective leader more interested in photo ops and managing the media than with bringing people together to solve the city's problems.

Lafayette Square, he said, was improved through cooperation. Ineffective leadership has stifled similar efforts citywide.

"We can accept those things that divide us, or we can work toward a common purpose to improve our communities," Reed said. "We can continue to develop reactionary policies, or we can bring the brightest minds together to develop long-term strategies to turn St. Louis into a world-class destination."

Here are some highlights from Reed's announcement:

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

All sides involved in the effort to bring down the cost of pensions for firefighters in the city of St. Louis say negotiations are going well.

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

The dispute over the best way to reduce the cost of firefighter pensions in the city of St. Louis continued on Friday, with Lewis Reed, the president of the Board of Aldermen, laying out his plan.

Reed, whose Twitter feed tracked the progress of a Thursday late-night meeting among himself, firefighters, and selected aldermen, says his plan will reduce the city's required contribution into the Fireman's Retirement System for next year by $7.6 million. Reed unveiled the plan at a City Hall news conference Friday.

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

The political fight raging over Mayor Francis Slay’s efforts to reform the pension system for St. Louis city firefighters continued at City Hall Friday.

The dispute started last week when board president Lewis Reed refused to assign the bills to a committee. Reed contends the board's rules give him until next Friday, Feb. 25, to make a decision.

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

Though they had no legislation to officially consider, members of the Public Employees Committee of the St. Louis Board of Aldermen spent almost three hours today discussing proposed changes to the pension system for the city's firefighters.

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

Saying they could not in good conscience declare that the city of St. Louis is in a fiscal crisis when it had a budget surplus last year, two members of the Board of Estimate and Apportionment on Wednesday forced a delay on implementing a third year of furloughs for city employees.

city hall with flowers
File photo | St. Louis Public Radio

A budget that proposes laying off 20 city workers to help close a $30 million gap is in the hands of the St. Louis Board of Aldermen.

Flickr/FiredUpMissouri

Missouri Republican Senators End Filibuster

Missouri's Senate has embraced a plan to extend federally funded jobless benefits while cutting eligibility for state-funded benefits.  Several Republican senators upset about federal spending ended a filibuster Thursday against legislation renewing the federal long-term benefits. That came after the Senate voted to cut state jobless benefits by six weeks, to a maximum of 20 weeks.

(St. Louis Board of Aldermen & Missouri Senate websites)

The newly re-elected President of the St. Louis Board of Aldermen has called a controversial state Senator "unfit to lead," and is asking her to step down over remarks she made about black politicians who are supporting local control of the St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department.

(Rachel Lippmann, St. Louis Public Radio)

The "long and arduous" fight over the budget for the city's fire department will go on for another week.

The three-member Board of Estimate and Apportionment tabled the layoffs of 30 firefighters at the request of Board of Aldermen president Lewis Reed. Reed, comptroller Darlene Green, and Mayor Francis Slay will make the ultimate decision about the layoffs.

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