Major Brands

Veronique LaCapra | St. Louis Public Radio

A federal appellate court has upheld a Missouri Prohibition-era law that requires residency for alcohol wholesalers.

Miami-based South Wine & Spirits challenged the law arguing it amounted to economic protectionism by the state.

Missouri has a three-tiered system that requires wholesalers based in the state serve as the distributors from those that make beer and alcohol to the retailers that sell it.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay cleared his schedule Wednesday to hit the road to Jefferson City in a last-ditch effort to get some favored legislation – notably, tax credits – approved before the session ends at 6 p.m. Friday.

Although two days are left, Slay's chief of staff Jeff Rainford said that Wednesday was realistically the last day to wield any influence in the state Capitol.

(via Flickr/Mooganic)

Legislation to redefine the relationship between liquor distributors, wholesalers and retailers has stalled in the Missouri Senate.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: St. Louis-based Major Brands has won Round 1 of the so-called “liquor war’’ in Jefferson City, after the Missouri House voted overwhelmingly this morning for a provision that redefines the word “franchise’’ when it comes to alcohol distributors and suppliers.

The House passed the amendment 112-47, adding it to a broader bill on alcohol issues that then passed 110-48. The measure then goes to the Senate, where the majority sentiment is less clear.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: For all the buzz in the Missouri Capitol about guns, education and the budget, a different issue is attracting all the bucks – alcohol.

At least two dozen lobbyists are wandering the halls, representing one side or another in a complicated case that is fueling an array of lawsuits, has given birth to two bills and has now entangled a disparate band of regional politicians and national political groups.