Mental Health

Mental Health
8:10 am
Sun December 7, 2014

After Ferguson, Psychologists To Organize Culturally-Based Therapy Groups

Child therapist Anita Blackwell (right) attends a workshop for Emotional Emancipation Circles on December 6, 2014 at Harris Stowe University. The training was held by the St. Louis Association of Black Psychologists.
Credit Durrie Bouscaren / St. Louis Public Radio

“My soul is grieving. Our collective soul is grieving,” Dr. Cheryl Tawede Grills said as she opened her training session for psychologists establishing therapy groups in a post-Ferguson world.  

The groups are called Emotional Emancipation Circles, or EEC’s, and they’re conducted in a specific way: create a safe space for people to talk about the racism they experience. Validate that experience. And give participants emotional tools to go forward.

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St. Louis on the Air
1:42 pm
Mon November 17, 2014

Mental Health Trek Documentary To Premiere At Film Festival

'Walking Man' will debut Monday night as part of the St. Louis International Film Festival.

In 17 days, Mark and Eric Norwine walked 200 miles across Missouri. They hope that the documentary about that trek will help change how people talk about mental health.

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Law Enforcement & Mental Health
12:16 pm
Tue September 23, 2014

Five More Questions With Sgt. Jeremy Romo On St. Louis Mental Health Officers

Along with mental health advocates and law enforcement officials, St. Louis County Police Sergeant Jeremy Romo coordinates the St. Louis-Area Crisis Intervention Team program.

The program trains officers to respond to people in a mental health crisis. As St. Louis Public Radio’s Durrie Bouscaren reported for NPR Tuesday morning, the need for this service becomes more pronounced as funding for mental health services declines in many communities.  

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Mental Health - Genetics
11:01 pm
Sun September 14, 2014

Wash U Study: Genetics Shows Schizophrenia Is Really Multiple Disorders

A Washington University study has linked dozens of gene networks to eight different forms of schizophrenia.
Credit Jonathan Bailey, National Human Genome Research Institute, NIH

New research from Washington University suggests that schizophrenia is actually a group of eight distinct disorders, each with a different genetic basis.

The findings could eventually open the door to earlier diagnosis and treatment of this debilitating mental disorder, which affects more than 3 million people in the United States.

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Mental Health
11:36 pm
Thu August 21, 2014

What’s Helpful To Know About Trauma After Upheaval In Ferguson

Regina Greer of the United Way Coaches volunteers at the new community resource drop-in center at the Dellwood Community Center on August 21.
Credit Durrie Bouscaren / St. Louis Public Radio

In the past two weeks, residents in Ferguson have seen familiar businesses broken into and looted, heard gunshots at night and had to drive through police checkpoints to enter their neighborhoods. Some say their trust of law enforcement has been deeply shaken since the death of 18-year-old Michael Brown at the hands of a Ferguson police officer, Darren Wilson.

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St. Louis on the Air
4:46 pm
Wed June 25, 2014

Are You Ready To Live Until You’re 100 or 120? You Just May Need To Be

American Edna Parker was the oldest living person in the world when she died in 2008. In this 2007 photo she was 114.
Credit via Wikimedia Commons

According to the Pew Research Center, hundreds of thousands of Americans could live to see 100 by the year 2050. Women in France, Japan and the United States have already lived past the age of 114. With the now realistic possibility that individuals may live into the triple digits, planning ahead for retirement becomes both more important, and more challenging.

Living Longer

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Cancer Treatment
10:43 pm
Thu June 5, 2014

Scientists Confirm 'Chemobrain' Is Real, Patients Find Validation

Dr. Bradley Schlaggar and his colleagues at the Washington University School of Medicine used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to visualize "chemobrain," a phenomenon that many patients receiving chemotherapy describe as a "mental fog."
Credit Bradley Schlaggar

  

Most people have heard about the undesirable side effects that chemotherapy has on the body of people suffering from cancer. There's balding, fatigue and loss of appetite, to name a few.

Until recently, however, chemotherapy’s effects on the brain weren’t widely recognized. The cognitive side effects – a  fuzzy memory and poor attention span – were usually dismissed by physicians, scientists and even some cancer patients.

The symptoms have a name: Post-chemotherapy cognitive impairment, or “chemobrain,” among those who suffer from it.

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Politics & Issues
11:02 pm
Thu April 3, 2014

Videotaped Incident Puts Spotlight On Police Interaction With The Mentally Ill

Credit (St. Louis Public Radio file photo)

A video that shows two St. Louis police department officers striking a man has once again put the spotlight on the fraught interaction between police and the mentally ill.

The man, Mario Crump, has a history of mental illness. His family had called police for assistance because he was acting erratically. It’s not clear what happened before and after the 40-second video, which was shot by a family member. The incident happened March 21 at Crump's house in the 4300 block of Lee.

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St. Louis on the Air
11:54 am
Thu April 3, 2014

When Children Are Exposed To Gun Violence, It Becomes A Public Health Issue, Say St. Louis Doctors

Credit (via Flickr/kcds)

The Newtown massacre has been seared in our collective memory. Gun violence involving teens in St. Louis, especially teens of color, is among the highest in the country.  The emotion in Roxana, Ill., after an April Fool’s prank this week put local focus on the issue. 

 

From school shootings to drive-bys to suicide, the level of exposure children in America today have to gun violence is in the news and on the minds of many. Because of this prevalence, some health care professionals contend that it has become a public health issue.  Among them:

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St. Louis on the Air
6:11 pm
Thu March 6, 2014

Business Partners Plan Mental Health Facility For Veterans With A Commmunity Approach

Ribbon cutting ceremony for River Trace Townhomes, an apartment complex for the families of veterans receiving treatment at Oasis Residential@Emerson.
(Courtesy AnthemUSA)

Plans are coming together for Oasis Residential@Emerson, a new supportive living community in St. Louis for veterans and other individuals with mental health issues, said business partners Sherman Strong and Kendall Brune.

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