Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum

Renée Cox, “It Shall Be Named” (1994). Gelatin silver prints, mahogany, and plexiglass, 105 x 104 1/2 x 4 3Ž4"(framed). Peter Norton Collection.
Courtesy of the Kemper Art Museum

A new gift of more than 50 artworks will expand the Mildred Lane Kemper Museum’s collection of politically conscious contemporary art. 

“Most of the works really have a political edge in relation, for example, to racism or feminism. There are also many works that deal with our media and image saturated society,” said the Kemper’s Director and Chief Curator Sabine Eckmann.

Sam Durant's “Proposal for White and Indian Dead Monument Transpositions, Washington, D.C.,” 2005  Kemper
Willis Ryder Arnold | St. Louis Public Radio

The Kemper Museum is hoping an exhibit of sculptures calling for more monuments dedicated to Native Americans at The National Mall in Washington, D.C., will build community engagement over the issue of Native American representation in American culture.

“We really hope to begin a dialogue, taking this work as a point of departure, with the Native American community,” said Kemper director Sabine Eckman.

photo by David Johnson / Organized by the Pulitzer Foundaton for the Arts & the Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts

Updated Monday, May 12 to include the fourth exhibition at CAM.

Three St. Louis institutions are opening major contemporary art exhibitions tonight: the Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts, the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis and the Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum at Washington University.

In the hope that St. Louisans will make it an “art night out,” a free shuttle service between the Kemper and Grand Center is being provided from 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.

David Johnson | PXSTL

 Think of it as your very own performance and gathering space. A former vacant lot, across the street from the Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts in St. Louis’ Grand Center, is booked for more than a dozen events through October. But in between, bring your guitar and your friends for a sing-a-long under its floating canopies. Or relocate your book club there for the summer.

“We want people to just respond to the space in ways we haven’t even imaged yet — and neither have they,” Pulitzer executive Kristina Van Dyke told St. Louis Public Radio.

Courtesy of Tokyo Institute of Technology

The Kemper Art Museum is hosting the very interesting “On the Thresholds of Space-Making: Shinohara Kazuo and His Legacy.” The exhibit, which runs through April 20, includes photos, original drawings and sketches. It is the first U.S. museum exhibit on an architect who helped reinvent architecture in Japan.

Alfredo Jaar, The Geometry of Conscience, 2010. A woman standing before silhouettes of heads.
Kemper Art Museum

An exhibit at Washington University’s Kemper Museum — In the Aftermath of Trauma: Contemporary Video Installations —  introduces painful political conflicts to St. Louis museum goers at oblique angles.

(Image courtesy of David Kordansky Gallery, Los Angeles) / (Courtesy Carlos and Rosa de la Cruz Collection, Miami. )

Although artist Rashid Johnson explores themes of identity and black history in his work, he does not see the exhibition of his work at the Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum to be an exploration of the black experience.

What it does show is the breadth of his work during the last fifteen years, in multiple mediums and with multiple layers of meaning.

© 2012 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris.

In early 20th century Paris, Pablo Picasso and Georges Braque were equally well known after they created the Cubist style of painting.  Today, Picasso is a household name while Braque is virtually unknown outside of art history circles.

Washington University’s Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum puts the spotlight on Braque with the opening of the exhibition ‘Georges Braque and the Cubist Still Life, 1928–1945.’