mining

Veto Session
4:00 am
Tue September 10, 2013

With Trials Looming, Missouri Lead Giant Hopes Legislature Will Limit Liability

The Doe Run Company

A lead mining company is heading to trial next month, but this week, they’re hoping to hedge their bet.

The Missouri legislature passed a bill earlier this year that would limit the amount of damages the Doe Run Company would have to pay if a jury found the company guilty of negligence. Governor Jay Nixon vetoed the bill, but Republican lawmakers are aiming for an override this week.

Updated 9/13/13 10:33 AM

Doe Run is the largest lead mining company in the western hemisphere, and they operate in southeast Missouri.

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St. Louis on the Air / Coal Protest
11:37 am
Tue January 29, 2013

Miners Protest In St. Louis Over Effects Of Patriot Coal Bankruptcy

Miners from across the country marching down Market St. in downtown St. Louis. They are protesting a Peabody Energy/Patriot Coal plan to cut pension and health care programs following Patriot's bankruptcy.
(Adam Allington/St. Louis Public Radio)

Hundreds of miners from across the country protested outside of St. Louis-based Peabody Energy on Tuesday.

The miners are accusing Peabody of orchestrating a bankruptcy in order to skip out on pension and healthcare benefits owed to some 10,000 retirees and their dependents.

At the heart of the dispute is Patriot Coal Corp., which was created by Peabody as a stand-alone company in 2007.  In creating Patriot, Peabody also transferred a hefty chunk of Peabody’s outstanding pension obligations onto Patriot’s books.

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Environmental Clean-up
6:30 am
Fri September 28, 2012

EPA Receives Funding For Lead Clean-Up In Madison County

Several counties in Missouri were included in lead mining, including Madison.
Wikimedia Commons

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced today clean-up methods it will take on a former mining site in Madison County.

The Madison County Mines Superfund site is part of the Old Lead Belt, where the mining of heavy metals began in the 1700s. The nearly 500-square-mile area is contaminated by lead, a highly-toxic metal that can wreak havoc on organs and tissues in the human body.

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Arch Coal
10:42 am
Mon October 3, 2011

Arch Coal agrees to pay $2M to settle pollution lawsuit

(via Arch Coal)

Updated 1:02 p.m. with company comment

Arch Coal Inc. will pay $2 million to settle a lawsuit over selenium pollution in West Virginia waterways.

The environmental groups that sued last year say the deal holds the St. Louis-based company responsible for past damage and prevents more.

Arch spokeswoman Kim Link said Monday the case involves five discharge points and subsidiaries Coal-Mac Inc. and Mingo Logan Coal Co.

She says Arch will install treatment systems and take other precautions to ensure consistent compliance with pollution limits.

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Superfund - Lead Pollution
4:24 pm
Tue March 8, 2011

EPA lists Washington County Lead District-Furnace Creek as Superfund site

Southeast Missouri lead district. (Wikimedia Commons user Kbh3rd)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has added the Washington County Lead District-Furnace Creek site in Washington County, Missouri, to the federal Superfund National Priorities List (NPL).

The NPL is a list of the nation's hazardous waste sites with the highest priority for cleanup.

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Arch Coal
12:12 pm
Tue March 1, 2011

Arch Coal to pay $4M, alter mining to curtail pollution

This mine in Pike County, Ky. uses mountaintop removal, the same process used in an Arch Coal mine in W. Va. that has come under fire from the EPA. (via Flickr/iLoveMountains.org)

Federal officials say Arch Coal will pay $4 million in fines and change some mining practices to settle alleged Clean Water Act violations in Virginia, West Virginia and Kentucky.

The deal announced Tuesday is between St. Louis-based Arch, the Environmental Protection Agency and the Department of Justice.

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Arch Coal
6:19 pm
Fri January 14, 2011

EPA revokes permit for Arch Coal mine in W. Va.

This mine in Pike County, Ky. uses mountaintop removal, the same process used in an Arch Coal mine in W. Va. that's come under fire from the EPA. (via Flickr/iLoveMountains.org)
(via Flickr/iLoveMountains.org)

In addition to the story about mining you may have heard on NPR's All Things Considered this evening, a St. Louis-based coal company, Arch Coal, is in some trouble for one of their mines in West Virginia.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is making good on a 9-month-old threat and revoking a permit for West Virginia's largest mountaintop removal mine.

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