Missouri Botanical Garden

Missouri Botanical Garden
10:17 pm
Wed September 24, 2014

Garden Glow Will Again Light Up Winter Nights

The Missouri Botanical Garden understands that an outdoor winter exhibit needs places that provide warmth.
Credit Provided by the Botanical Garden

What do you do with success? If you are the Missouri Botanical Garden, you repeat it.

Last year's Garden Glow had about 98,000 visitors. “We know that it is something people enjoyed, public information officer Katie O’Sullivan said. “We heard from a lot of people that they would like to make the festival part of their annual traditions over the holidays.”

So the Botanical Garden is bringing the event back. This year’s version will be larger in hopes of making it even more impressive.

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Environmental Learning
9:44 pm
Thu September 18, 2014

Missouri Botanical Garden Wins Grant for IMAGINE Program

The Kemper Center For Home Gardening at the Missouri Botanical Garden
Credit Laila Wessel | Missouri Botanical Garden

The Missouri Botanical Garden has been awarded a grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services for $140,605. The money will go toward developing the Botanical Garden’s IMAGINE program. IMAGINE stands for Innovative Modeling Across the Garden to Investigate Neighborhood Ecology. The project will form a partnership between the Botanical Garden and nearby schools to teach kids about environmental issues in their communities.

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Twig galls
6:16 am
Sun July 27, 2014

Blame Wasps And Squirrels For All The Oak Leaves On Your Lawn

A gouty horned gall on a pin oak. The growth is caused by a small wasp, and will eventually grow large enough to cut off nutrients to the leaf.
Credit (Courtesy of the Missouri Botanical Garden)

If you have an oak tree in your yard, you may have found yourself picking up more leaves and branches than expected this summer. 

According to Missouri Botanical Garden horticulturist Chip Tynan, there are two culprits.

The first are tiny wasps that cause a growth, known as a gall, to form on twigs and small branches of oak trees. The second offender are squirrels, who think the galls make a tasty snack.

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Missouri Botanical Garden
11:21 pm
Thu July 10, 2014

Artist To Explain How 300,000 LEGOs Became Climatron Surprises

Snake
Nancy Fowler | St. Louis Public Radio

Everybody thinks their own kids are geniuses when they make cars, castles and the occasional bridge out of LEGOs. But a New York artist has truly transformed what must’ve been the world’s largest LEGO set into 25 nature-themed sculptures.

Sean Kenney’s traveling exhibit currently occupies the Missouri Botanical Garden’s Climatron, posing behind plants, crouching over the soil and waiting to be discovered.

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Missouri Botanical Garden
2:01 pm
Tue July 1, 2014

Stopping To Smell A Corpse (Flower) At The Botanical Garden

Izzy, the Titan Arum, or "corpse flower" bloomed Monday night at the Missouri Botanical Garden. People from all over the region came to see it and smell its nasty odor.
Credit Alan Greenblatt

You still have a few hours left to smell the corpse flower.

The Titan Arum, an Aroid plant from Sumatra, is currently in bloom at the Missouri Botanical Garden. It flowers rarely, but when it does, its strong odor definitely carries.

“It smells like rotting flesh,” said Andrew Wyatt, the Garden's vice president of horticulture. “It spreads the foul smell over many miles because it’s trying to attract pollinators from another plant several miles away.”

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St. Louis On The Air
6:15 pm
Thu June 26, 2014

Local Journalist Details Missouri's Environmental Issues in New Book

Don Corrigan also discussed issues with the smoldering Bridgeton Landfill during the conversation and in his book.
Credit Véronique LaCapra, St. Louis Public Radio

 Missourians need to be worried – and need to act.

That is the message of Environmental Missouri: Issues and Sustainability — What You Need to Know, a new book from Webster University journalism professor and Times Newspapers editor Don Corrigan.  The book is an overview of various aspects of our environment and sustainability shortfalls – in addition to what we are doing right.

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St. Louis on the Air
4:24 pm
Wed June 4, 2014

Going Green At Home With Native Plants: Tips To Build Native Habitats Into Your Landscaping

Purple coneflowers are native to Missouri.
Credit Courtesy Missouri Botanical Garden

The Missouri Botanical Garden annual Green Homes Festival is this Saturday at the Kemper Center for Home Gardening. One of the focuses of this year’s festival is gardening with native plants, or “naturescaping.”

Using native plants is environmentally friendly because it works within the existing ecosystem, explained Jean Ponzi, Green Resources Manager at the EarthWays Center of the Missouri Botanical Garden.

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Youth
1:46 pm
Sat May 31, 2014

Young Entrepreneurs Plant Sweet Potatoes in Missouri Botanical Garden

Participants and supporters of the Sweet Potato Project plant seedlings at the Missouri Botanical Garden on Saturday.
Credit St. Louis Public Radio

Sweet potatoes planted by St. Louis teens now have their own plot in the Missouri Botanical Garden.

Young members of an effort called the Sweet Potato Project planted seedlings on Saturday, joined by Garden leaders and other supporters. The project teaches teens from north St. Louis how to grow sweet potatoes sustainably, mainly in vacant lots, and then how to brand and sell sweet potato products.

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St. Louis on the Air
3:19 pm
Tue April 29, 2014

What Does The Harsh Winter Mean For Spring Gardening? Tips From Horticulturists

Several listeners had questions about their azaleas, which aren't doing too well after the cold winter.
via Flickr/Louise Docker

After an especially harsh winter, spring has returned to St. Louis. Gardeners across the region are planting and planning for the growing season.

But the plants are still feeling the effects of the unusual cold, said Missouri Botanical Garden horticulturists June Hutson and Elizabeth Spiegel.

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Plant Biodiversity
2:15 pm
Fri August 23, 2013

Missouri Botanical Garden Completes Encyclopedia Of Missouri's Native Plants

The Flora of Missouri includes detailed information on all of Missouri's native vascular plants, like this purple coneflower (Echinacea purpurea).
Lisa Francis, Missouri Botanical Garden

The Missouri Botanical Garden has completed a 26-year effort to document the state's native plants.

The three-volume Flora of Missouri contains illustrations, plant distribution maps, and a detailed description of each species, including its taxonomy, uses, and conservation status.

This encyclopedic work updates the original Flora of Missouri, first published in 1963 by the late Julian Steyermark.

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