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News

What builds your trust in the news media? On Friday's Behind the Headlines, we'll discuss with local newsmakers and a researcher who studies media trust.
Flickr |NS Newsflash

American trust in the media is falling to new lows, unaided by President Donald Trump’s outspoken negative views of the press and news organizations. But in a time where “fake news” and “alternative facts” swirl about us like smoke from a fire, the need for journalists fact-checking and combing through truths and lies is more important than ever.

What makes something news? It’s a question journalists ask themselves every day.

Whether it’s a breaking story or a scheduled event, news editors and managers have to decide whether or not to cover it.

After months and months of election coverage, Don Crozier was frustrated by what he saw as sensationalism and bias in the media. He worried that news had become too focused on entertainment or shock in the hunt for clicks and shares.

Crozier wanted to learn more about how news directors make decisions, so he turned to St. Louis Public Radio’s Curious Louis.

committee crowd at microphone
Joseph Leahy / St. Louis Public Radio

A year after Michael Brown's death, Ferguson and the issues raised there continue to resonate in St. Louis and elsewhere. This week from our newsroom you’ll hear voices reflecting on the past year, meet artists and musicians transformed, see images of profound moments in history and get acquainted with the experiences of your neighbors. Join us on-air and follow our stories here in our news section.

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There’s a new news aggregator in town: RealtimeSTL.com, brought to you by the former regional editor of Patch STL, Kurt Greenbaum. The website curates news about St. Louis based on what is trending on social media.

“We’re bringing together sources of information from all over the St. Louis area. And we’re trying to organize this in a way so that readers can really find out what people are talking about in St. Louis,” Greenbaum said.

(Via Flickr/Richard O. Barry)

Should a journalist strive most to be fair and objective? Or should his or her primary goal be transparency? Can a content-producer be both an advocate and a journalist? What is the role of the press in the future of democracy and what should its journalistic ethics be?

These are questions news outlets and individual journalists alike must answer as they navigate the future of journalism in the United States, and the topic of discussion during the Second Annual Public Ethics Conference at the University of Missouri-St. Louis on Thursday, November 14.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Dear Beaconites --

One paradox of the digital age is that we are simultaneously drowning in information and thirsty for knowledge. When anybody can publish anything and reach everyone, then all of us are inundated all the time with a lot of nothing. Finding what's trustworthy and meaningful is a constant challenge.

This article originally appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Dear Beaconites -

What do Amazon founder Jeff Bezos, Boston Red Sox owner John W. Henry and the Beacon have in common? Here are some answers in the form of a Beacon B List: