NFL

The St. Louis Stamping Co. sits in the shadow of the proposed NFL stadium in St. Louis. The six-building complex, at Cass Avenue and First Street, Florida and Collins streets, was built in 1871 and 1913.
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Much has been made of what St. Louis could gain with a new NFL stadium, but what about the things it could lose?

The proposed plans for the stadium include demolishing two dozen buildings, including the St. Louis Stamping Co. buildings and the Cotton Belt Freight Depot. Both are part of the National Register of Historic Places, but that doesn’t provide protection — it denotes the building has historic significance.

St. Louis Rams owner Stan Kroenke is unhappy with the current state of the Edward Jones Dome. When the Rams moved to St. Louis in the 1990s, the contract stipulated that the stadium had to remain in the "top-tier" of other NFL facilities. The Dome is wide
Jason Rosenbaum, St. Louis Public Radio

The already murky future of professional football in St. Louis got a bit gloomier on Monday. 

Officials confirmed that the St. Louis Rams officially entered into a year-to-year lease with the St. Louis’ Convention and Visitors Commission. And the Los Angeles Times reported an Inglewood stadium plan had garnered 20,000 signatures – twice the amount needed to put the measure on the ballot. 

Joe Ehrmann speaks at TEDxBaltimore on Jan. 25, 2013.
TEDxBaltimore via Flickr

Joe Ehrmann, a minister and retired professional football lineman, says many of society’s problems can be traced back to three words.

“The three scariest words every boy receives is when he’s young and told ‘Be a man,’” Ehrmann told “St. Louis on the Air” host Don Marsh this week. “That’s always in the context of stop acting that way, stop with the tears, stop with the emotions, don’t be a mama’s boy. At a very early age, boys start to separate their hearts from their head(s).”

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

Football season is over. The Cardinals are still in Spring Training. St. Louis has no NBA to entertain us. The Olympics were fun while they lasted, but they took St. Louis Blues hockey away from us (until Wednesday). And we still don’t have a Major League Soccer team here. It's fair to say, the region is in a bit of a professional sports slump right now. And what have we been doing to endure the lull?

(via Flickr/IndofunkSatish)

Rams trade down, draft Brockers

The St. Louis Rams drafted LSU defensive tackle Michael Brockers in last night's first round of the NFL Draft.

The Rams traded back from the sixth pick to the number 14 pick with the Dallas Cowboys after the Jacksonville Jaguars traded up to the fifth pick to draft wide receiver Justin Blackmon. The Rams also got a second round pick from the Cowboys in the trade.

The NFL announced the St. Louis Rams have agreed to play regular season games in London for the next three years. The first game will be against the New England Patriots in 2012.

The Rams will play the Patriots Oct. 28 at Wembley Stadium. This will be the sixth straight year the NFL has played regular season in the British capital.

NFL commissioner Roger Goodell said "we are confident that having the Rams host one game in the UK in each of the next three seasons will allow us to better serve the growing popularity of our sport beyond the borders of the United States."

Adam Allington / St. Louis Public Radio

Adversaries in the contentious pro football labor battle convened in a Federal Appeals Court in St. Louis on Friday.

The National Football League is appealing an April injunction from a Minnesota Judge that temporarily lifted the lockout.

The NFL Players Association is in the process of suing the league, claiming that the lockout in violation of federal anti-trust laws.

Paul Clement is an attorney for the NFL team owners; he told a three-judge panel that the issue before them is one for labor laws to decide.