Nine Network

Donna Korando | St. Louis Public Radio

A penalty of more than $422,000 that had been sought from the Nine Network in St Louis by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting has been reduced to a little more than $32,000.

After an in-depth investigation, CPB said that the station, better known as KETC Channel 9, had not misspent any funds connected with its lead role in the nationwide American Graduate program.

From event poster

Emily Colmo knows a whole lot more about sunflowers today than she did three months ago. Back then, she began her sunflower journey in distressed parts of St. Louis, where vacant land has been planted with these tall and vivid flowers. Colmo came to discover the importance of increasing our levels of environmental sustainability and our responsibility for distressed and decaying areas of all sorts. Now, she's ready to show all of us what she's learned through a documentary.

ketc building
Courtesy KETC

The Corporation for Public Broadcasting's inspector general says the Nine Network of Public Media in St. Louis should repay more than $422,000 it received for its role in leading other public media stations in the American Graduate program, an effort to help more students earn their high school diplomas.

Courtesy of PBS

Four St. Louis girls were selected to star in an episode of the PBS show SciGirls, which challenges middle school girls and their professional mentors to become citizen scientists by using skills in science, technology, engineering and math.

In the episode titled “Frog Whisperers,” the girls volunteer for FrogWatch USA, a citizen science project that encourages nature enthusiasts to report frog and toad calls in a given area.

Denise Thimes, Peter Martin, at the piano, Chris Thomas and Montez Coleman preform on 'City of Music.' The Nine Network series premieres March 16, 2015
Ray Marklin / Nine Network

In a two-part series, the Nine Network is exploring St. Louis’ musical legacy.

Evelynn Johnson, second from left, and her family meet with genealogist Kenyatta Berry, second from right, at Union Station in St. Louis during filming for PBS' 'Genealogy Roadshow.' Johnson's story will be shared in the show's Feb. 10, 2015, episode.
Courtesy of Jason Winkeler / PBS

When PBS’ “Genealogy Roadshow” asked for queries from St. Louis residents last year, Evelynn Johnson gave them her great-grandfather's name.

“I was asking my mom if were kin to another family that shared our last name,” Johnson told “St. Louis on the Air” host Don Marsh on Thursday. “She said ‘Well, this is your great-grandfather’s name. See if they know him.’”


Public Broadcasting Service president and CEO Paula Kerger announced Thursday that PBS and the Nine Network will host a town hall-style forum this month.

“America After Ferguson: Bridging the Divide” will be hosted by Gwen Ifill. It will be recorded on Sept. 21 and broadcast nationally Sept. 26, including on the Nine Network.

From the collection of the St. Louis Mercantile Library at the University of Missouri-St. Louis.

In 1764 Auguste Chouteau made landfall on the banks of the Mississippi River and began construction of the fur-trading post that would become St. Louis. He was just fourteen at the time, and acting at the behest of his mother's lover, Pierre Laclede. Forty years later, as a prominent citizen of the city, he penned an account of the founding in a journal that is still partly preserved today.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: I am a kid from north St. Louis. Actually I am no longer a kid but when it comes to soccer, there is always a kid inside me wanting to get back on the field to compete.