obesity

(via Flickr/Indofunk Satish)

MAP scores released

The St. Louis school district could be a year away from regaining partial accreditation.  Missouri's Annual Performance Reports, or MAP scores, have been released today.  They show that St. Louis city schools have met seven standards, including one academic standard. 

Education Commissioner Chris Nicastro says they're looking for sustained improvement over time.

(via Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)

Missouri is among 12 states cited in a new government survey with very high obesity rates.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released figures Monday showing that Missouri is among a dozen states with obesity rates of at least 30 percent. The CDC says 30.3 percent of Missourians are obese.

Overall, more than a third of adults are obese. The latest figures are based on a 2011 telephone survey that asked adults their height and weight. For the first time, households with only cell phones were included.

(via Flickr/IndofunkSatish)

Study says region needs more immigrants

A new study to be released this morning says the St. Louis region needs to attract more immigrants if it wants to thrive in the current economy.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch got an advance look at the study, written by Saint Louis University professor Jack Strauss.

(via Flickr/Dani Lurie)

Washington University's Center for Obesity Prevention and Policy Research and the Missouri Foundation for Health have launched a "first-of-its-kind" website with information on obesity-related policy for organizations across the state.

The site, named "Policy Lift" has a variety of different functions, as an announcement about the site describes:

flickr/rcbodden

Dangerously hot in St. Louis Metro area Monday and Tuesday

The National Weather Service has issued an excessive heat warning for Monday and Tuesday due to extreme temperatures and humidity.

John Carney with the National Weather Service says heat index values will range from 110 to 115 degrees.

Scientists have taken another step toward understanding human nutrition.

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine have shown they can grow entire collections of human intestinal microbes in the laboratory.

Washington University microbiologist Dr. Jeffrey Gordon says his team then transplanted the bacterial communities into previously germ-free mice, to see how the lab-grown bacteria would respond to a human diet.

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