Patricia Wolff | St. Louis Public Radio

Patricia Wolff

Meds and Food For Kids

On a typical day in 2010, Joseph Volcy found himself sitting outside of his church after choir practice when he felt a great tremble, “like a bulldozer on the road.” He looked up, and from his seat on a bench, he saw half of a mountain come down behind his church. Then came the dust.

“I didn’t know what was going on,” Volcy said. “No one could see where they were going. When I left the church to go home, I couldn’t. I saw a lot of people on the back of taxis and people being brought to the hospital, where some of them died. But I still couldn’t tell what was going on.”

This article first appeared in th St. Louis Beacon, Feb. 7, 2012 - Patti Gabriel supported herself and her two children through freelance photography, a job that demands constant searching for jobs that pay well. For years, she seldom had the luxury of shooting -- and showing -- something she did just because she wanted to. That freedom to do speculative documentary work, work she sees as helping others, makes much more special her upcoming show at the Sheldon: "Northern Haiti: Human Landscape."

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Jan. 12, 2012 - Two years ago today, a 7.0 magnitude earthquake hit Haiti, killing more than 200,000, according to press reports, and leaving millions homeless. A few days later, Dr. Patricia Wolff, a St. Louis-based pediatrician, arrived in the country to find that everything had changed.

Dr. Pat Wolff at a clinic.
Provided by Washington University

Dr. Patricia Wolff, founder and Executive Director of Meds & Foods for Kids (MFK) was one of our guests today on St. Louis on the Air.  MFK has been in Cap-Haïtien combating malnutrition with Medika Mamba (aka Ready-to-Use Therapeutic Food)  since 2003.  Last year’s earthquake exacerbated an already extreme situation there, crippling existing infrastructure and multiplying demand for limited resources.

Dr. Pat Wolff at a clinic.
Provided by Washington University

Six months after Haiti's devastating earthquake, some Haitian institutions are planning for a "new normal."

The tragedy in Haiti has steeled the determination of several seasoned St. Louis volunteers to educate, mentor and help more Haitians become self-sustaining. Haitians must serve their own people and run their own hospitals, schools and society, they said in interviews this week.

Expansions are planned in Haiti for two St. Louis-founded institutions.