Pew Research Center | St. Louis Public Radio

Pew Research Center

Parishioners pray during a Sunday morning Mass at Our Lady of Guadalupe in Ferguson on Nov. 19, 2017.
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

In this week when many St. Louisans and others around the country gather for the Thanksgiving holiday, before they dive into the turkey and pumpkin pie, they will pray.

But why? Why does prayer remain so important to many people at a time when, according to the Pew Research Center, the number of U.S. adults who do not identify with any organized religion is growing?

It’s mostly because prayer is a given for people who follow almost any faith tradition, according to Shane Sharp, an associate professor of sociology at Northern Illinois University in DeKalb.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Only 31 percent of Jewish adults across the United States are affiliated with a synagogue, according to a large-scale study "A Portrait Of Jewish Americans" being released this morning by Pew Research in Washington, D.C.

Pew only counted as synagogue members those who pay dues, but its researchers interviewed a much wider spectrum of adult Americans who call themselves Jewish.

What builds your trust in the news media? On Friday's Behind the Headlines, we'll discuss with local newsmakers and a researcher who studies media trust.
Flickr |NS Newsflash

Each year, the Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism releases a report about the state of the news media.

The Center’s report for 2013 shows the newspaper industry is down significantly, specifically employment, which is down “30 percent since 2000 and below 40,000 full-time professional employees for the first time since 1978.”

The report identifies six major trends: