Preservation

The Goldenrod Showboat's final resting place: The Illinois River, near Kampsville, Ill.
Mary Delach Leonard|St. Louis Public Radio

Volunteers will gather on Thursday at a remote spot on the Illinois River to say their final farewells to the Goldenrod Showboat, a St. Louis landmark they worked relentlessly to preserve.

The century-old showboat suffered irreparable damage last summer during efforts to save it from the flooding river. Since then, volunteers have worked on weekends to remove artifacts -- chandeliers and gilded mirrors, furnishings and photographs -- for future display in museums.

Buster Brown Blue Ribbon Shoe Factory
Maria Altman |St. Louis Public Radio

Jim Osher can’t imagine how anyone could think of tearing his building down.

"You see that piece of wood?" he asks pointing to a massive rafter. "That’s old growth Douglas fir. You can’t get that anymore."

During a 2010 interview, Norman Seay shared this photo of Jefferson Bank protesters being led to jail. A young William Clay, before he was elected to Congress, is second from left. Seay is the man wearing a hat and is behind the man with a pocket handkerc
Provided by Mr. Seay

A major gift is helping the Missouri History Museum contradict the notion that the civil rights movement was a quiet affair in St. Louis.

“The lunch-counter sit-ins happened in St. Louis before they happened in North Carolina, but people don’t know that story,” said Melanie Adams, managing director for community education and events. “People don’t realize that there were slaves suing for their freedom before Dred Scott. Those stories just are not out there being told.”

From left to right, Andrew Weil, Lance LeComb, Bill Schnell, and David Lott.
Áine O'Connor | St. Louis Public Radio

The collapse of the 155-year-old Cutlery Factory building on Laclede’s Landing last week may have been a freak event, but along with the two-year closure forecast for rebuilding the Kingshighway bridge, it has raised legitimate questions about the sustainability and strength of St.

Alex Ihnen (left) and Mary Ostafi (right) joined host Don Marsh in studio.
Áine O'Connor | St. Louis Public Radio

A couple of initiatives in downtown St. Louis are changing the way that St. Louis’ old buildings are preserved—by transforming them.

Dutchtown South Block
Willis Ryder Arnold | St. Louis Public Radio

Two local neighborhoods — one affluent, one working class — and two local historic buildings are being considered for inclusion on the National Register of Historic Places.

(provided by Carla Pearson Alexander)

Updated June 25th with vote results

The Preservation Board voted unanimously Monday to approve the city landmark designation. It still requires action by the Board of Aldermen.

Our original story

The St. Louis Preservation Board will vote tonight on whether to make the site of a north St. Louis grocery store a city landmark.

(ABS Consulting)

Updated at 2:15 p.m. May 6 with official emergency declaration.

St. Louis's building commissioner has ordered the immediate removal of Cupples 7 due to "significant hazards that pose an immediate and imminent danger to the public health, safety and welfare."

The 'flying saucer' in St. Louis' Midtown made local headlines this year as preservationists fought to keep its unique, otherworldly shape intact. The Atlantic Cities has now nationally recognized this effort as one of its most important preservation battles of 2012.

(via Flickr/IndofunkSatish)

Amanda Vinicky contributed reporting from Springfield.

Ill. lawmakers have packed agenda when they return to Springfield

State lawmakers in Illinois have about seven weeks left to untangle a host of thorny problems.

(via Flickr/ScottSpaeth)

The city of St. Louis will spend the next two years documenting and researching area buildings that went up during the post-World War II construction boom.

(The Lawrence Group via Saint Louis University)

The St. Louis city Planning Commission has agreed to consider whether Saint Louis University should be allowed to tear down three buildings at the old Pevely Dairy site in midtown to build a new ambulatory care center.

Michael Allen, Preservation Research Office

 

2011 was an excellent year for historic preservation in the region, and here are some of the reasons why.

(The Lawrence Group via Saint Louis University)

Updated 10:30 p.m. Dec. 19

Saint Louis University says it's considering all options after the city's Preservation Board denied its request to demolish most of the Pevely Dairy complex and replace it with a new $75 million ambulatory care building at the site.