protest

Protesters and police after shooting on the one year anniversary of Michael Brown's death
Durrie Bouscaren | St. Louis Public Radio

Updated as of Mon., August 10, 2015 at 3:45 p.m. with father's statement, originally updated at 1 p.m.

The man who St. Louis County Police say was shot by detectives after he fired on them Sunday night near protests in Ferguson has been identified as Tyrone Harris, 18, of Northwoods, according to the police department.

Harris has been charged with four counts of assault on law enforcement in the first degree, five counts of armed criminal action, and one count of discharging or shooting a firearm at a motor vehicle. A cash only bond has been set at $250,000.

Ferguson October protesters
Camille Phillips | St. Louis Public Radio

The Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C., is adding protest artwork and signage to its permanent collection. Emily Bland, one of the artist-protesters, said the Smithsonian’s decision to conserve Ferguson protest art could cement the protests’ importance in the public eye.

The protest in Clayton Friday, March 20, 2015 had a funeral theme, complete with a white casket carried through the streets.
Camille Phillips | St. Louis Public Radio

More than 100 people marched through the streets of Clayton Friday in a continuation of protests begun last August after Michael Brown was killed.

Two Ferguson activists have received an award for their writing in the wake of Michael Brown’s August death.

DeRay McKesson and Johnetta Elzie won the 2015 Howard Zinn Freedom to Write Award.

 the Rev. Dr. William G. Gillespie Residence Hall and Student Center at Harris-Stowe State University
Harris-Stowe State University website

After a heated exchange on Martin Luther King Day between protesters supporting “reclaimMLK” and Harris-Stowe State University students, the university and protesters are working to turn confrontation into conversation. On Tuesday student representatives and administrators met with a Ferguson activist to start a dialogue and “hopefully move forward as a community.”

Protesters gathered in Clayton today - 101 days after the shooting death of Michael Brown in August.
Emanuele Berry//St. Louis Public Radio

It has been 101 days since the shooting death of Michael Brown in Ferguson, and protesters continue to call for justice.

About 50 protesters gathered Monday in Clayton for the “Carnival of Injustice,” a theatrical protest that organizer Elizabeth Vega hoped would engage people in activist satire and start a dialogue.

"You know the tension is palpable," Vega said. "This is the carnival of injustice, so if we don't laugh we'll cry."

Activist Lisa Fithian leads a training session at Greater St. Mark's Church in Dellwood. 11/08 Durrie Bouscaren
Durrie Bouscaren / St. Louis Public Radio

In Ferguson, nearly every store window is boarded up along West Florissant Avenue. Police department have stocked riot gear and held trainings to respond to potential civil unrest. And protesters have held sessions to organize their own response.

In many ways, it feels as though the St. Louis region is holding its breath awaiting the grand jury’s decision over whether the Ferguson police officer who shot and killed 18-year-old Michael Brown will face charges.

Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay met Thursday with youth activist leaders to address a set of demands presented to him on Monday, when protesters stormed City Hall.

The demands include a civilian review board for police and independent reviews for officer shootings resulting in fatalities. Protesters also want all city police to be equipped with body cameras, and for police to give up any military equipment acquired through the Pentagon's 1033 program.

10.02.14 Devin James said he is still serving as spokesman for the city of Ferguson on a pro-bono basis, though the St. Louis Economic Development Partnership fired him after it learned of his criminal record.
Rebecca Smith

Ferguson officials are working on plans to alert residents in case of future unrest, according to public relations strategist Devin James, who said he still represents the city on a pro-bono basis.

"Say for example, if there is an outbreak of something that goes on tonight and a protest goes from peaceful to violent, what are we supposed to tell residents to do? Are we supposed to tell them to evacuate, the National Guard is coming in? So a lot of those type of conversations are what they're working on now," James said.

Ferguson Police Lt. Craig Rettke is confronted by two protestors in the middle of S. Florissant Road Sunday night.
Stephanie Lecci | St. Louis Public Radio

An at-times uneasy peace held Sunday night between police and protesters, just one night after shots unrelated to demonstrations were fired at two area police officers, hitting one.

More than 150 protesters gathered Sunday for a march outside the Ferguson Police Department on S. Florissant Road, chanting and banging out rhythms on pots, drums and tambourines. Cars driving by honked in seeming support.

Willis Ryder Arnold | St. Louis Public Radio

(Updated at 2 p.m. Sunday September 28, 2014 with further details from St. Louis County Police.)

Overnight, two area police officers were shot at — a Ferguson officer wounded in an encounter near the Ferguson Community Center, and a St. Louis officer injured by flying glass when his car was hit by gunfire on Interstate 70 near Interstate 170.

Vashon High School freshman Rochelle Mason joined other students in a walk-out over substitute teachers and quality resources.
Stephanie Lecci | St. Louis Public Radio

About 100 students from St. Louis' Vashon High School walked out of classes Friday morning to demand more full-time teachers and better textbooks.

The students also were upset about certain school policies and the hiring of a new principal.

Vashon has been under scrutiny after it earned only 28 percent of available points on the most recent report card from the state.

Substitute teachers 

Bill Greenblatt | UPI

Most people want the nightly violence in the streets of Ferguson to end.

But getting there could take a while.

The protestors who have been gathering daily in Ferguson since the shooting death of Michael Brown on Aug. 9 say they just want justice done.

For many, that means seeing police officer Darren Wilson arrested and imprisoned.

But Washington University public health professor Darrell Hudson said short of that, providing more information about the investigations would help.

Protesters are greeted by lines of state and county police during a demonstration march on the Ferguson police station on August 11, 2014.
Bill Greenblatt | UPI

Armored cars, rubber bullets, riot shields and K-9 units have had a regular presence at demonstrations in Ferguson over the past week since a Ferguson police officer shot and killed an unarmed teenager, Michael Brown.

 

Thursday, Gov. Jay Nixon put the Missouri Highway Patrol in charge in Ferguson and called for a softer tone in the police presence.

Many are wondering if the police went overboard in using force against the crowds that have gathered in Ferguson every evening since Brown's death.

Joseph Leahy / St. Louis Public Radio

Dozens of Korean protestors demonstrated in Forest Park Sunday, wearing black to mourn the victims of last month's ferry disaster in South Korea, which killed more than 300 students and others.

They also called for an investigation into the  South Korean government's mishandled rescue attempts. Their anger and frustration, which has been growing among the Korean communities worldwide, came shortly before South Korea's president announced she will disband the country's Coast Guard over its response to the tragedy.

Washington University Student Protest Continues

Apr 13, 2014
UPI.

Monday marks the seventh day that a group of students at Washington University has conducted a sit-in on campus to protest the school’s relationship with Peabody Energy.

The coal company’s president and CEO, Greg Boyce, sits on the university’s board of trustees. Peabody and other companies help fund research at the college’s Consortium for Clean Coal Utilization.

Student Jamal Sadrud-Din says Peabody’s activities harm both the environment and vulnerable communities.

Erin Williams

Fast food workers and supporters donned ponchos and held signs today as they rallied for change in the Central West End as part of the STL Can’t Survive on $7.35 campaign.

Protesters marched between Arby’s, McDonald’s, and Domino’s Pizza as they seek a pay increase for employees to $15 an hour and the right to unionize without backlash.

One of the protesters was Kenta Jackson, a shift leader at Church’s Chicken who makes $8.50 an hour. She didn’t tell her manager she wouldn’t be at work, but isn’t worried about the repercussions.

Joseph Leahy/St. Louis Public Radio

Occupy movements from across the country are gathering this week in St. Louis to revive their populist protests against banks, corporations and government.

Rachael Perrotta, a media coordinator from Occupy Chicago said the regional conference will stage at least four non-violent group actions in St. Louis against various companies including Monsanto.

“Welcome to the American Spring," Perrotta said. "Our movement is expanding. We're growing. Winter was the time for internal organizing. Spring is the time to get back into the streets." 

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

A federal judge in St. Louis has rejected attempts of Occupy St. Louis protestors to re-establish their encampment in Kiener Plaza.

Attorneys for the protestors, who were evicted from the park early Saturday morning, had asked Judge Carol Jackson to stop enforcement of the city's parks curfew until the case went to trial. Jackson denied that request saying the protestors had not proven they were highly likely to win if the case went to trial.

KMOV-TV is reporting that six people were arrested during a protest Monday at the Bank of America branch in downtown Clayton.

According to the report: