race

St. Louis on the Air
5:43 pm
Wed June 11, 2014

New Documentary Explores “White Flight” In Spanish Lake

Credit Brent Jones/St. Louis Public Radio

In 1990, the population of the Spanish Lake community in north St. Louis County was 80 percent white and 20 percent black. By 2010, the population was reversed: 80 percent was black and 20 percent was white.  Today, much of the township lies empty.

In what is being called an “unflinching” documentary, film director Phillip Andrew Morton takes a look at the causes of this population shift in the film "Spanish Lake.” It premieres Friday, June 13 at the Tivoli Theatre.

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Police Department
8:14 am
Wed September 4, 2013

St. Louis Police Officer Receives Racist Letter

The logo of the St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department as displayed on a patrol car.
(St. Louis Public Radio)

St. Louis Police Chief Sam Dotson says he’s frustrated and disappointed after learning a black officer received a racist letter through interdepartmental mail.

Dotson has ordered internal and criminal investigations after learning about the letter last week.

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4:58 pm
Tue March 26, 2013

Washington Post: Missouri Has Highest Rate Of Black Homicide Death In America

Lead in text: 
The Washington Post has released a project this week entitled "Gun suicide and homicide: statistics shaped by race." In the project's interactive graphic, Missouri is listed, along with Washington, D.C. as the state/area with the highest rate of black homicide death in the nation. Explore more of the Post's work in this project via the link.
America's pattern of gun deaths is split across black and white, with the vast majority of whites dying from suicide and a similar proportion of blacks dying from homicide. A similar split occurs with more homicide in diverse urban cities and more suicide in the rural areas that are predominantly white.
Clay says federal help on the way
3:17 pm
Sat September 29, 2012

Clay: Federal Help To Fight Crime On The Way

Congressman Lacy Clay (D-Mo) greets participants at a race and violence event in St. Louis on Saturday.
(Photo by Bill Raack/St. Louis Public Radio)

Congressman Lacy Clay of St. Louis says the federal government may soon be able to help local police as they try to combat crime in some parts of the city.


The St. Louis Police Department has recently reassigned some officers to so-called “hot spots” where violent crime continues to be a problem. Clay says there should be announcements in the next few months about combined federal-and-local crime-fighting efforts.

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Robertson Fire Protection District
12:58 pm
Wed July 11, 2012

St. Louis County fire supervisor: refusal to 'dig up dirt' on black employees brought retaliation

A federal lawsuit claims a white St. Louis County fire supervisor was retaliated against for refusing to "dig up dirt" on two black employees.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reported that the U.S. Attorney's office filed the suit against the Robertson Fire Protection District on behalf of the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.

The suit alleges that in 2004 or 2005, Chief David Tilley called then-Battalion Chief Steve Wilson into his office and used a racial slur when telling him to go through the computers of the black employees.

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Race / Law Enforcement
12:14 pm
Fri June 1, 2012

In Missouri, black drivers 72 percent more likely to be pulled over, report says

via Flickr/davidsonscott15

Updated 12:34 p.m. with link to full report and information about 2010 data.

Black motorists are stopped by Missouri law officers at an increasingly disproportionate rate.

An annual report released Friday by the attorney general found black drivers were 72 percent more likely than white motorists to be pulled over in 2011. Black drivers were stopped 2.5 times more often than Hispanic drivers.

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from St. Louis on the Air
4:31 pm
Wed April 4, 2012

NPR's Michele Norris on race, dialogue and walking on eggshells

Photo courtesy of The Race Card Project

“I’m afraid to say something wrong. ”

“I hate hearing “the neighborhood changed. ””

“I’m so tired of this subject. ”

These "six word essays" are about race. They were written on the backs of three different postcards, by three different people, from three different parts of the country. They represent the thousands of responses NPR’s Michele Norris has gotten in response to her request: Race, your thoughts, six words, please send.

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Rock 'n' Rock Marathon hits St. Louis
4:36 pm
Fri October 21, 2011

21,000 runners get ready to rock 'n' roll in St. Louis

A map of the marathon and 1/2 marathon courses
(Map courtesy Competitor Group, Inc.)

More than 21,000 runners and walkers will wind their way through St. Louis city streets this Sunday as part of the Rock 'n' Roll Marathon and half-marathon.

The race is unique because it will feature 26 live bands and 18 local cheerleading squads performing along the course. The band Sugar Ray will headline a concert at the finish line. Margie Martin, the event’s manager, says they were surprised by how many people signed up to participate in this, the first Rock-n-Roll Marathon here. 

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Stroke Care
4:55 pm
Thu May 26, 2011

Analysis suggests racial and ethnic disparities in stroke care

A new analysis suggests racial and ethnic minorities are not getting equal treatment when it comes to strokes.

At the request of the American Heart Association, a group of stroke experts led by Saint Louis University neurologist Dr. Salvador Cruz-Flores examined the scientific literature for racial and ethnic disparities in stroke care.

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Race in St. Louis
6:35 am
Fri April 15, 2011

Bound by Division - Race in St. Louis

This map, using 2010 census data, gives a birds-eye view of race in St. Louis. Red is White, Blue is Black, Green is Asian, Orange is Hispanic, Gray is Other, and each dot is 25 people.
(via Flickr/Eric Fischer)

Jack Straughter was a pipefitter in the 1960s when he and his wife were looking for a new house for their family of seven, and so he could have afforded to live almost anywhere in the city of St. Louis.  But as a black man, there were places he never considered looking.

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