Race | St. Louis Public Radio

Race

via Flickr/davidsonscott15

Updated 12:34 p.m. with link to full report and information about 2010 data.

Black motorists are stopped by Missouri law officers at an increasingly disproportionate rate.

An annual report released Friday by the attorney general found black drivers were 72 percent more likely than white motorists to be pulled over in 2011. Black drivers were stopped 2.5 times more often than Hispanic drivers.

Photo courtesy of The Race Card Project

“I’m afraid to say something wrong. ”

“I hate hearing “the neighborhood changed. ””

“I’m so tired of this subject. ”

These "six word essays" are about race. They were written on the backs of three different postcards, by three different people, from three different parts of the country. They represent the thousands of responses NPR’s Michele Norris has gotten in response to her request: Race, your thoughts, six words, please send.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Feb. 3, 2012 - Professor Teresa Guess has no love for the word race.

"It's my least favorite word in the English language," she says. "I see it as a very politically loaded concept that seems more to divide than it seems to unite."

(Map courtesy Competitor Group, Inc.)

More than 21,000 runners and walkers will wind their way through St. Louis city streets this Sunday as part of the Rock 'n' Roll Marathon and half-marathon.

The race is unique because it will feature 26 live bands and 18 local cheerleading squads performing along the course. The band Sugar Ray will headline a concert at the finish line. Margie Martin, the event’s manager, says they were surprised by how many people signed up to participate in this, the first Rock-n-Roll Marathon here. 

A new analysis suggests racial and ethnic minorities are not getting equal treatment when it comes to strokes.

At the request of the American Heart Association, a group of stroke experts led by Saint Louis University neurologist Dr. Salvador Cruz-Flores examined the scientific literature for racial and ethnic disparities in stroke care.

(via Flickr/Eric Fischer)

Jack Straughter was a pipefitter in the 1960s when he and his wife were looking for a new house for their family of seven, and so he could have afforded to live almost anywhere in the city of St. Louis.  But as a black man, there were places he never considered looking.

(St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department)

Authorities say 19-year-old William Mack Sapp of south St. Louis County is charged with second-degree assault and leaving the scene of an accident. He is jailed on $500,000 bond following his arrest on Wednesday. It wasn't immediately clear if Sapp had an attorney.
The other alleged racer, 19-year-old Trenton Pinckard of Glen Carbon, Ill., was charged earlier this week with leaving the scene of an accident.

St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department

A 19-year-old Metro East man has been charged in a drag racing accident that left another teen in critical condition.

I'm a transplant.

It was 1991 and the city was experiencing one of its highest murder rates in years.

I showed up as new college graduate ready to perform a year of volunteer work for a local community service agency. The housing they provided was on the site of a community center in the College Hill neighborhood near O'Fallon Park on the city's north side.

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St. Louis Beacon | 2009

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: When the Beacon sent out a query through our Public Insight Network asking about people's experiences with race, we got more than 100 responses from old and young, black, white, Hispanic, American Indian and foreign-born.

Here, we share some of those stories, from a black woman who saw a Middle Eastern man refused service, to an Iranian family business who found community support when they least expected it.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: November 21, 2008 - The recent criticism by Ayman al-Zawahiri of Obama as the anti-Malcolm X illustrates the tendency to homogenize racial groups. This Al-Qaeda leader suggested that Obama, along with Condoleezza Rice and Colin Powell, were "house slaves." This term refers to Blacks who are deferential to Whites. He also called out Obama as a betrayer to his Muslim heritage. Talk followed about the differences and/or similarities between Obama and Malcolm X.

Will whites vote for Barack Obama?

Aug 15, 2008

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: August 15, 2008 - Danny Sanders says he has seen the face of racism first hand.

"My dad was from Arkansas, and he hated black people," said the retired St. Louis baker and Vietnam veteran, who was fishing for catfish this week at Carondelet Park. "And a long time ago, I used to feel the same way.

"But I have changed.

"People do change, you know?"

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