(Missouri Senate)

Nearly a week after failing to agree on a congressional redistricting map, House and Senate negotiators unveiled a compromise which both chambers passed Wednesday night.

The “grand compromise map” resolves sticking points over how to divvy up Jefferson County among three congressional districts and St. Charles County among two.

(Missouri House Communications)

Missouri House members have voted to approve another congressional redistricting proposal just a few hours after negotiations over a map broke down with senators.

The House endorsed another map by voice-vote on Friday. House supporters say it was designed to address a couple senators' concerns over other redistricting proposals.

Marshall Griffin, St. Louis Public Radio

House and Senate negotiators have failed to reach an agreement on a congressional redistricting map before today’s self-imposed deadline.

Republican House leaders had wanted a compromise map ready to pass before Easter Weekend, in order to have time to override a potential veto from Democratic Governor Jay Nixon during the regular session.

Marshall Griffin, St. Louis Public Radio

For the second time this week, the Missouri House has taken a day off from floor action.

And once again, it’s tied to the struggle between the House and Senate over congressional redistricting.

(via Flickr/Mark and Allegra)

IL residents can weigh in on redistricting

Residents of the Metro East will have an opportunity to voice their opinions today on how state lawmakers should redraw Illinois'  Congressional and state legislative districts.

Mo. Senate

The Missouri House has rejected the changes made to its redistricting map by the Senate, which on Wednesday took its own map and substituted it in the House bill before passing it.

The main sticking point appears to be how much of Jefferson County will fall into the rural southeastern Missouri congressional district.

Mo. House of Representatives

The congressional redistricting map passed by the Missouri House last week is now in the hands of the State Senate.

And the consensus so far is that both Democrats and Republicans don’t like it.


Missouri Senate to Debate Marquee Issues Today

Missouri Senate leaders plan to debate legislation redrawing Missouri's congressional districts and allowing utilities to charge electric customers for some costs of developing a second nuclear power plant in the state. Both bills are likely to generate significant discussion.

Mo. House of Representatives

The congressional redistricting map passed by the Missouri House last week has narrowly passed a State Senate committee.

Mo. House of Representatives

Another filibuster in the Missouri Senate may be brewing, this time over redistricting.   

Majority Floor Leader Tom Dempsey (R, St. Charles) says he expects fellow GOP Senator Bill Stouffer (R, Napton) to try and block the redistricting map passed this week by the House, and possibly the Senate version as well.

Mo. House of Representatives

The Missouri House has given first-round approval to a Republican-proposed map that would redraw the state’s congressional districts, reducing them from nine to eight.

It eliminates the St. Louis-area district currently held by Democrat Russ Carnahan.

Election Day in St. Louis

It's election day in Missouri and voters in St. Louis and Kansas City will head to the polls to decide whether to retain each community's 1 percent earnings tax. In St. Louis, the $140 million from the tax is about a third of the city's revenue. If the proposition fails, the tax will be phased out over the next ten years. 

Mo. Senate

A Missouri Senate committee today released and voted to approve its proposal to redraw the state’s congressional districts.   

The Senate map is similar to the House map, as both split up the district represented by Democrat Russ Carnahan among four other districts, three of which are currently represented by Republicans.

(via Flickr/jennlynndesign)

Missouri Senate Committee to Release Redistricting Map Today

A Missouri Senate committee is preparing to consider a plan for developing new congressional districts. Missouri is losing one of its nine seats in the U.S. House, and the state Legislature is responsible for drawing the boundaries of the eight resulting districts. The Senate committee on redistricting is scheduled to release its proposed map today.

Mo. House of Representatives

A Missouri House committee tasked with redrawing the state's congressional districts has released an alternate map submitted by Democrats on the committee.

The first map, favored by the committee's Republican majority, was made public last Wednesday.

Mo. House Communications

A State House committee’s plan to redraw Missouri’s congressional districts is drawing fire from both urban and rural residents and from both political parties.

The state is losing a seat in Congress based on the latest U.S. Census figures.

Opening Day in St. Louis  is Here

Albert Pujols is about to begin what could be his final season with the St. Louis Cardinals. The team expects a rousing welcome for the three-time NL MVP, even though Pujols is playing hardball off the field. Year 11 for Pujols, all with the Cardinals, begins today at Busch Stadium against the San Diego Padres. Game time is 3:15 p.m.

House Redistricting Map Would Eliminate Third District

Marshall Griffin, St. Louis Public Radio

A GOP-chaired House committee on redistricting has released the first map showing how Missouri’s congressional districts may soon look.

Missouri is losing a seat in Congress, dropping from nine to eight, based on figures from the 2010 census.

(Screenshot via Mo. Sec. of State website)

Gov. Jay Nixon has appointed the members of two bipartisan commissions that will redraw Missouri's legislative districts based on the 2010 census.

The Missouri Constitution requires the governor to appoint a panel of five Republicans and five Democrats to redraw state Senate districts, and a panel of nine Democrats and nine Republicans to redraw the House districts.

(Screenshot via Mo. Sec. of State website)

State politicians were in St. Louis today to solicit public feedback on redrawing Missouri's congressional map from nine districts down to eight.

The outcome may mean a decrease in political clout for the metro region.