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Saint Louis Science Center

Jeremy Bailey/St. Louis Public Radio

"Harry's Big Adventure: My Bug World" opens October 19th at the Saint Louis Science Center. As a tasty addition, every weekend the attraction will host bug chefs preparing sweet, salty and crunchy bug treats. Cityscape host Steve Potter previewed the exhibit with Bug Chef Jayme Necaise and sampled an array of those bug-filled snacks.

Saint Louis Science Center

The Saint Louis Science Center’s current exhibition Lost Egypt: Ancient Secrets, Modern Science has sparked an interest in the afterlife in ancient Egyptian culture.  Earlier this month, Michele Loyet, Adjunct Professor on Near Eastern and Egyptian Archaeology  at Webster University, spoke at the Science Center on the topic of mummification in Egypt.  She was Don Marsh’s guest on St. Louis on the Air to talk about the afterlife tradition in ancient Egypt.

(Kristi Luther/St. Louis Public Radio)

After 17 years, the giant, inflated event and exhibition space at the Saint Louis Science Center known as the "Exploradome" has come down.

What started as an experiment to test the need for such a space, the Exploradome was deflated on Monday to make way for a permanent exhibition structure with indoor and outdoor elements. The Science Center says the dome took just over 9 minutes to deflate.

Here's a time lapse of the deflation:

Hieroglyphics are just one element of ancient Egypt explained in the exhibit.
Provided by the Science Center | 2013

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon - With the St. Louis Science Center's new exhibit, “Lost Egypt: Ancient Secrets, Modern Science,” you can peel back the layers of an ancient civilization that continues to fascinate people.


Saint Louis Science Center

In 1961, a parent of one of Charles Schweighauser’s students told him that a planetarium was being built in Forest Park and suggested that he apply for the job of director.  He figured that he was too young, but applied anyway.  Much to his surprise, he was hired the day before his 25th birthday.  Almost two years later, on April 16, 1963, the James S. McDonnell Planetarium opened its doors giving St. Louisans a state-of-the art way to view the universe in its star chamber.  The space race between the U.S.

SK Films

Citizen science is a growing opportunity for non-professional and amateur scientists to participate in professional research.

There are numerous opportunities for citizen science in the St. Louis area and engaging in such endeavors can contribute to protecting environments and preserving species.

Courtesy SLSC, Copyright IMAX Corporation

The Saint Louis Science Center has an exhibition and is showing a documentary film about wildlife rescue and rehabilitation.

Host Steve Potter talks with David Lickley, the director of Born to be Wild, about the film on orphaned orangutans and elephants and the people who rescue them.  Steve also talks with Bert Vescolani, the President and CEO of the Saint Louis Science Center, about the Wildlife Rescue Exhibition.

There is strong evidence that human-produced greenhouse gases—like carbon dioxide and methane—are changing the Earth’s climate.

So says the President of the National Academy of Sciences, Ralph Cicerone.

He spoke about the science of climate change at the Saint Louis Science Center this week.

And Cicerone told St. Louis Public Radio’s Véronique LaCapra that although the climate has changed in the past, this time is different.

An exhibition on climate change has opened at the Saint Louis Science Center.

The exhibition stays away from political controversies, focusing on the science of climate change and its human and environmental implications.

Through text, diagrams, interactive stations, and videos, the exhibition shows how human activities are producing greenhouse gasses and contributing to climate change.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: October 6, 2008 - This Thursday, Oct. 9, the St. Louis Science Center kicks off SciFest 08, a five-day festival celebrating science in St. Louis and around the world. From global warming, to the physics of baseball, to the science of chocolate, the festival promises something for everyone.