Senate

Brian Nieves
Official photo

State Rep. Brian Nieves, R-Washington, said in an exclusive interview Sunday night that his wife's cell phone and records have been subpoenaed in what he calls the continued "malicious prosecution" of accusations that Nieves assaulted the campaign aide of a rival Republican in this summer's nasty contest for the 26th District state Senate seat.

Former state Sen. Betty Sims, R-Ladue, has been named by Gov. Jay Nixon, a Democrat, to the state's Coordinating Board for Higher Education.

Sims held the 24th District state Senate post from 1995-2003, when she had to step down because of term limits. She was succeeded by Democrat Joan Bray, who also is leaving after this year because of term limits. (The 24th District has the region's only competitive state Senate this fall, between Democrat Barbara Fraser and Republican John Lamping.)

The two current lines of attack lobbed at Missouri's two major-party candidates for the U.S. Senate -- Republican Roy Blunt and Democrat Robin Carnahan -- both revolve around the same word: Deceit.

He's accused of misrepresenting his role and votes in the federal bank bailout, while she's under fire for switching her stances on the Bush tax cuts.

Missouri voters are likely to hear a lot about both issues as the Senate race heads into its final two-month stretch.

Hometown supporters of embattled state Rep. Brian Nieves, R-Washington, Mo., are planning to hold a prayer vigil beginning at 6 p.m. this evening in Rennick Riverfront Park.

Nieves is telling allies that he didn't organize the event but does plan to attend. Allies say it is in response to the legal problems he faces as a result of an allegedly combative encounter in Nieves' office the day after he won the Aug. 3 GOP primary for the 26th District state Senate post.

At a "prayer vigil" held Monday night by his allies, state Rep. Brian Nieves blamed his legal troubles on unnamed "kingmakers and the powerbrokers in the state of Missouri" who he contends want to block his likely ascension to the Missouri Senate.

"They want to hang me up like a scarecrow," asserted Nieves, R-Washington, to at least 150 people attending a riverfront rally in downtown Washington, Mo. The crowd frequently broke into cheers and standing ovations to show their support.

In the final weeks before an election, candidates no longer raise much money. They spend it.

That's certainly true this month, right before the Aug. 3 election.

The biggest spender in July appears to be Republican Tom Schweich, who's competing against state Rep. Allen Icet for their party's nomination for state auditor.

Happy over his continued edge in the polls, U.S. Rep. Roy Blunt (right) celebrated Sunday with St. Louis Republicans in what he declared was his 560th campaign event in Missouri since launching his bid for the U.S. Senate.

Blunt, R-Springfield, highlighted some of his key themes as he energized city Republicans at their annual picnic at Carondelet Park by taking on national Democrats and his expected target this fall, Missouri Secretary of State Robin Carnahan.

More than 55,000 Missourians, and an estimated 115,000 in Illinois, will see their unemployment benefits extended or restored as a result of the legislation approved by Congress last week and signed into law Friday by President Barack Obama.

Senate Republicans had blocked the extension of unemployment benefits since the first week of June; Democrats broke the filibuster after the new interim senator from West Virginia was sworn in.

Less than two weeks before the Aug. 3 primary, it's time for the candidates to tout last-minute endorsements from various big-name politicians in hopes of swaying any still-undecided voters or, in the case of uncontested races, heighten ones profile for the fall.

Today, U.S. Rep. William Lacy Clay (left), D-Mo., announced he has chosen sides in the combative Democratic primary in the 24th state Senate district, and is endorsing former state Rep. Sam Page (right), D-Creve Coeur.

Brad Hildebrand's small AM radio station in Washington, Mo. is called "The Mouth."

And the station is definitely making political waves with its morning voice -- state Rep. Brian Nieves (right), R-Washington and a candidate in arguably the region's most competitive Republican primary for the state Senate.

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