shipping

Véronique LaCapra, St. Louis Public Radio

Some Mississippi River tugboats will be getting an upgrade thanks to a federal grant aimed at reducing air pollution.

The more than $300,000 grant from the Environmental Protection Agency will go toward new, cleaner-burning diesel engines for the tugboats.

One of those boats was on view this morning at JB Marine Service, Inc., the barge cleaning and repair company that received the EPA grant.

via Flickr | jennlynndesign

Legislation before the Missouri House would make it easier and cheaper for a Canadian company to ship radioactive material through the state.

If the bill becomes law, Ontario-based Nordion Inc. would not have to pay fees or have shipments of colbat-60 undergo mandatory inspections in Missouri. The company sells colbat-60 for use sterilizing medical devices.

The Kansas City Star reports the amendment was written by a trade group for Nordion.

(Via Flickr/Official U.S. Navy Imagery/Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Eric C. Tretter/Released)

Reporting from KRCU's Jacob McCleland used in this report.

Missouri Department of Transportation officials anticipate the Panama Canal Expansion Project will bring more shipping traffic to Missouri’s waterways.

Freight development administrator Ernie Perry says there won’t be a sudden boost in river traffic, but the larger canal will make river shipping more feasible.

(via Flickr/roberthuffstutter)

After years of drought, barge operators along the Missouri River got more rain than they had hoped for this year.

The industry had grown optimistic when rising river levels appeared to promise an increase in barge traffic this year. The Missouri Department of Transportation even projected a 15 percent to 20 percent increase.

But then the rains started, causing flooding along the 675-mile stretch from Sioux City, Iowa, to St. Louis. That prompted the U.S. Coast Guard to close the river between Gavins Point Dam in South Dakota and Glasgow, Mo.