St. Louis Area Foodbank

St. Louis County Police officers unload a truck of food donations at the St. Louis Area Foodbank on Monday.
Courtesy St. Louis County Police

The St. Louis County Police Department donated its remaining cache of more than a ton of nonperishable food items it received from supporters during the unrest in Ferguson to the St. Louis Area Foodbank on Monday.

Back in November, county police put out a call for donations of grab-and-go, hand-held snacks that officers could easily take with them to eat during long shifts. The department said people from across the St. Louis area and the country sent in hundreds of pounds of food.

A truck from the St. Louis Area Food Bank makes a delivery at a rural southern Illinois church that was holding a food fair for low-income residents.
Mary Delach Leonard | St. Louis Beacon | 2010 File photo
  • Cans of soup.
  • Diapers.
  • Cash to buy gas to keep the trucks running.

The holiday wish list for St. Louis agencies that assist the hungry is long and never-ending because what comes in, soon goes out -- and the shelves need to be filled again.

(Maria Altman, St. Louis Public Radio)

The St. Louis Public Library has renewed a popular program for forgiving overdue book fines.

All through July, adult card holders with late fines can pay with food. Every can or box brought in will knock a dollar off of their fines up to $25. The food goes to the St. Louis Area Foodbank.

The St. Louis Public Library started Food For Fines in 2008. The library's communications coordinator John Koniak said they’ve been amazed at the reaction.

(via Flickr/HeatherKaiser)

Black Friday. Cyber Monday. And now, Giving Tuesday.

Last year New York's 92nd Street Y launched a Giving Tuesday campaign to kick-start charitable donations in the wake of the shopping fervor of Black Friday and Cyber Monday. The United Nations Foundation joined the campaign as a partner with the Y, and in the end 2,500 organizations participated in 2012.

(via Flikr/NAVFAC)

According to a report released in September by the University of Missouri-Columbia, the percent of people who have inadequate access to food rose more in Missouri than in any other state in the nation from 2000 to 2010.

Approximately 1.3 million Missourians are currently classified as "food insecure." About 400,000 Missourians experience hunger.