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St. Louis County Library

After-school meals will be available at six library branches, paired with activities like weekly chess instruction.  8/12
Kara Smith | St. Louis County Library

An after-school meal program in St. Louis county that feeds hungry children in public libraries is expanding.

St. Louis County Library and the nonprofit group Operation Food Search began the effort as a summer program in 2014. They expanded it in January 2018, serving 6,200 meals at three library branches between then and May.

Tricia Frank lays out books in community room of Woodhollow Apartments in Maryland Heights Friday, June 22, 2018. The Parkway North High School teacher delivers books because the nearby St. Louis County Library branch is closed for renovation. 6/22/18
Ryan Delaney | St. Louis Public Radio

Tricia Frank’s car breaking down this spring was a good thing: Now she has more storage space in her new, larger vehicle.

Frank is using that new car to deliver books to four apartment complexes in the northern part of the Parkway School District in lieu of the St. Louis County Library branch, which is closed this summer for renovation.

Musical instruments will be available to check out at four St. Louis County libraries starting June 25, 2018.
Kara Smith | St. Louis County Library

A program at the St. Louis County Library will allow residents to check out an assortment of musical instruments starting Monday.

The program is the first of its kind in the St. Louis region, said library district director Kristen Sorth. Lending musical instruments would be beneficial to many in the area, she said.

Camp creator Michael Ford with a camper in May 2017.
The HipHop Architecture Camp

About 2 percent of architects in the U.S. are African-American. That’s a statistic Michael Ford wants to change by inspiring young people to think of new ways to solve urban development problems that segregate and marginalize low-income communities.

Ford wants to achieve this goal using  hip-hop music and culture. He created The Hip-Hop Architecture Camp in 2017.

Anna Quindlen fields a question from Don Marsh during last week’s event.
Photo courtesy of St. Louis County Library

On Monday’s St. Louis on the Air, listeners heard host Don Marsh in conversation with bestselling novelist Anna Quindlen. She was in town last week for a book-signing event presented by St. Louis County Library, and Marsh interviewed her on stage before an audience of more than 200 people.

Among many other topics, the discussion touched on Quindlen’s decision to give up a Pulitzer Prize-winning career in journalism to become a full-time novelist.

Provided | Katy Jamboretz

A new project is providing on-the-go reading materials for Metro Transit riders in north St. Louis County.

The program, which launched this week, is a partnership between the St. Louis Promise Zone, St. Louis County Library, Bi-State Development, the Metro Transit and the St. Louis Economic Development Partnership. It will provide free books and other reading materials through “community library boxes” at four Metro Transit centers including: North Hanley, Wellston, Rock Road and North County.

Waller McGuire (L) and Kristen Sorth (R) joined host Don Marsh.
Alex Heuer | St. Louis Public Radio

By the end of the year, 88 students will begin a program that could result in them earning a high school degree.

The Career Online High School is a partnership between the St. Louis Public Library and St. Louis County Library.

“We are trained to find ways to meet patrons where they are and come up with programs and services to help people in our community,” said Kristen Sorth, director of the St. Louis County Library.

Sorth along with Waller McGuire, executive director of the St. Louis Public Library, joined St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh on Tuesday.

 Terry Johnson, 25, uses a computer at St. Louis Public Library's central branch on Thurs., July 20, 2017. Starting in October, students will be able to use computers like this one to obtain an online high school diploma
Ryan Delaney | St. Louis Public Radio

The more than 80,000 adults in the St. Louis region who didn’t earn a high school diploma will soon have two different ways to finish their degrees.

Enrollment will begin in October for the online program jointly run by the St. Louis Public Library and the St. Louis County Library. And a new Missouri law is paving the way for an adult high school to open in St. Louis sometime in the next two years.

A view of one of the renovations at the Florissant Valley branch of the St. Louis County Library.
Kara Hayes Smith | St. Louis County Library

St. Louis County Library has been going through some changes these past few years – closing and reopening renovated branches and experimenting with other new programs. To date, the system will have 17 renovated or replaced branches by year's end.

In 2018, a few more branches will be renovated and then St. Louis County Library headquarters will be updated. You can find a full list of completed and planned projects here.

stacks of library books
faungg | Flickr

Don't count on using an interlibrary loan service to get a book from outside your town or county in the future. Services like interlibrary loan may be at risk in the upcoming round of federal budget cuts.

The Trump administration’s proposed budget, released this week, would eliminate funding to the Institute of Library and Museum Sciences, a federal agency that provides significant funding to Missouri’s state, local, and county library systems.

Greenwood Cemetery Preservation Association

The St. Louis County Library will explore the disappearance of African-American sites in the region at a presentation tonight.

The panel discussion is the third event in the library's "We Are St. Louis” series exploring the nuanced identities of the region’s residents. It will be held at the Lewis & Clark branch in north St. Louis County.

The Cliff Cave branch of the St. Louis County Library system reopened on Sept. 21, 2016, after renovation work. That included the children's area, pictured here.
(Photo courtesy of St. Louis County Library)

Phase two of a project to replace or renovate 19 of the 20 St. Louis County Library brancheis set to get underway this month.

The first phase of what’s called the “Your Library Renewed” campaign included 11 projects throughout the county. Kristen Sorth, library system director, says that work cost about $58 million, which came from a 2012 property tax increase. Phase two will cost about $79 million.

Laura Polak and her niece Ruby take part in Lap Time at St. Louis County Library's Grant's View branch.
Provided | St. Louis County Library

Whether mom reads “Goodnight Moon” before bedtime every night for a month, or grandpa helps the kids check out seven new books each week, St. Louis County Library wants to make sure babies and toddlers are getting exposed to lots of different words.

To encourage parents to start reading to children early and often, the library launched a program Monday called 1,000 Books Before Kindergarten.

LWYang | Flickr | http://bit.ly/29LQomS

Summer is in full swing and whether you’re looking for a book to read poolside, at the park, or just staying indoors to get away from the heat, we’ve got you covered.

On Tuesday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh talked with three local book experts about what they’re recommending as the top summer reads. We also heard from listeners who shared their favorite summer reads so far. 

Five suggestions from Kris Kleindienst, co-owner, Left Bank Books:

Fifteen-thousand newborns will get free books and a tote bag of swag as part of the St. Louis County Library's expanded "Born to Read" program.
Pixabay

A St. Louis County Library program that gives books to newborns to boost early childhood literacy is doubling in size this year.

St. Louis County Library

A new local organization wants to get the conversation about race and racism started with a group you may not expect: young, white families in St. Louis. We Stories: Raising Big-Hearted Kids is using children’s literature to “create conversation, change and hope in St. Louis” with the aim of making St. Louis more inclusive.

Seven-year-old Phoenix Torno checks out his own reflection in the telescope's internal mirror, while his younger brother Bodhi tries to get in on the action.
Véronique LaCapra|St. Louis Public Radio file photo

Libraries throughout the St. Louis area will soon have more telescopes available for checkout.

The St. Louis Astronomical Society put 29 telescopes together over the weekend, bringing the total number of telescopes at area libraries to 88 by March 17.

St. Louis County Library

Uh-oh. You just found a long-overdue library copy of “Hop on Pop” wedged deep under your child’s bed, and you don’t relish the thought of paying as much in fines as it would have cost to buy the book in the first place.

If the book was checked out from the St. Louis County Library, you can relax. As of New Year’s Day, the library has decided that children’s books, CDs and DVDs are exempt from overdue fines.

The teen area of the newly renovated Indian Trails library branch, which is reopening on Monday, Nov. 23, 2015.
Provided | St. Louis County Library

Some St. Louis County library patrons may soon have to temporarily switch branches. The library system is in the process of opening or re-opening six locations while closing another five for renovations.

Robert Knudsen, White House Press Office (WHPO), Wikimedia Commons

Betty Boyd Caroli is an expert about the first ladies of the United States. She’s turned her biographer’s eye toward the Roosevelt women, Michelle Obama and even Hillary Clinton. She most recently released a biography about Lady Bird Johnson, the first lady to the 36th President of the United States, Lyndon B. Johnson. It is called “Lady Bird and Lyndon: The Hidden Story of a Marriage that Made the President.”

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