St. Louis International Film Festival

In 2010, Marshall the Miracle Dog was rescued from deplorable conditions in southwest Missouri.
(Courtesy: Jay L. Kanzler)

After its world premiere at the St. Louis International Film Festival, "Marshall the Miracle Dog" is ready for another St. Louis showing.

Via Cinema St. Louis

Flipping through the nation’s family album, what’s missing? That question led director Thomas Allen Harris to create “Through a Lens Darkly: Black Photographers and the Emergence of a People,” a film that examines how photography shaped the identity and perceptions of blacks in America.

“In some ways, it is a history lesson, although it’s kind of a different take on history because we have a lot of contemporary artists in the film,” Harris told “Cityscape” host Steve Potter on Friday. “In many ways, as they do this, they reshape the way in which we view history.”

Meet Me in St. Louis
(Used with Permission / Missouri History Museum)

On Nov. 22, 1944, a throng of St. Louis theatergoers packed Loew’s State Theater on Washington Avenue for the world premiere of “Meet Me in St. Louis.” 

Although filmed elsewhere, the musical told the story of the Smith family as it struggled with the prospect of leaving St. Louis for New York in advance of the 1904 World’s Fair in St. Louis.

Seventy years later, the film endures. Critic Roger Ebert once praised it as “one of the most artful, moving, and exquisitely designed musicals in film history.”

In 1833, two men from Giessen, Germany, decided to immigrate to the United States where they hoped to create their own utopia with the freedoms and democracy they desired but did not have under an aristocracy. They recruited hundreds of others and formed the Giessen Emigration Society.

“It was the year 1834 when 500 Germans came over here to Missouri with the big idea of creating a German state as a new state within the United States of America,” Peter Roloff told “St. Louis on the Air” host Don Marsh on Tuesday.

In 17 days, Mark and Eric Norwine walked 200 miles across Missouri. They hope that the documentary about that trek will help change how people talk about mental health.

website

Updated 5:30 p.m. Nov. 14 with new review.

The St. Louis International Film Festival is underway with enough options to ensure that almost everyone can find something of interest.

Some of us in the newsroom of St. Louis Public Radio checked out the list of offerings and asked to review films that caught our interest. As you check out our mini reviews, you should know that several of the movies we requested were not available and that some of us asked for more than time permitted. These are just a taste of what is available.

Wikimedia

The St. Louis International Film Festival, which opens tonight, will pay tribute to the man considered to be the first movie star. Today, he's largely forgotten.

'The Makings of You,' directed by Matt Amato, will open the St. Louis International Film Festival on Nov. 13.
Courtesy of Matt Amato

The 23rd annual St. Louis International Film Festival opens next week with a very St. Louis love story.

“The Makings of You,” starring Sheryl Lee of “Twin Peaks” as Judy and Jay R. Ferguson of “Mad Men” as Wallis, tells the story of a romance between two lonely St. Louisans. Director Matt Amato, a St. Louis native, returned to St. Louis when he began working on the film in June 2013.

“It’s a genuine St. Louis product from top to bottom,” Amato told “Cityscape” host Steve Potter on Friday.

Kyle Jacoby / St. Louis Public Radio

    

The St. Louis International Children's Film Festival not only showcases kid-friendly films, but teaches them how to create their own movies and shorts.

In its second year, the festival will feature 19 films over two weekends at six venues, with workshops throughout the week.

Wikipedia

From April 1-6, the 2014 Greater St. Louis Humanities Festival will explore “Migration and Mobility.” A series of programs will examine connections among migration, immigration and culture, locally and globally. Most events are free. For more information, visit the festival website.

For video artist Zlatko Ćosić, the concept of personal and cultural identity is a continuing evolving one. And he likes it that way.

(Courtesy Cinema St. Louis)

Two of the film directors currently screening films at the St. Louis International Film Festival have closer ties than most to St. Louis. Peter Bolte and Brian Jun both grew up in the St. Louis region. Both are graduates of Webster University, and both shot their films on location in St. Louis and Southern Illinois.

(Courtesy Cinema St. Louis)

The systematic plagiarism and fabrication of then-New York Times reporter Jayson Blair a decade ago represents one of the most flagrant and grievous breaks in journalistic trust in modern times. It was a black mark against one of the World's flagship newspapers when his deception was revealed, prompting a detailed retraction from the Times and internal restructuring within the organization.

Tim Fuller

Actress Susan Claassen has had the same look for years. But it wasn't until she saw a show on Edith Head one night on the Biography channel that Claassen realized her appearance was very similar to costume designer Edith Head, whose Hollywood career spanned from 1923 to her death in 1981.

"She [Edith Head] really was an executive woman before there was such a thing," said Claassen. "It was a boy's club when she came in in 1923. And the films are as timeless as her designs."

(Courtesy Cinema St. Louis)

Two new documentary films showing at the St. Louis International Film Festival are taking on the perception and work of public defenders in the criminal justice system.

“I think the biggest public misconception about public defenders is that we don’t care and we are poor attorneys, poor meaning we don’t do a very good job and we don’t know how to try cases,” said Brandy Alexander, assistant public defender for the 20th Judicial Circuit in Florida.

(Courtesy Cinema St. Louis)

The 22nd Annual St. Louis International Film Festival begins November 14th. More than 300 films will be screened over a period of ten days.

(UPI/Rick Meyer)

The EF-5 tornado in Joplin, Missouri in May 2011 killed 161 people and a left city and its residents devastated.

Two filmmakers - Beth Pike and Erica Tremblay - have created films documenting the disaster, the fallout, and what they call a “remarkable recovery.”

Jason Epperson

Jean King and Richard Baron first met in 1968, when the two joined forces to protest conditions and rent hikes in St. Louis public housing.

Together, they earned a reputation as “imaginative leaders” and community advocates, attracting the attention of author/filmmaker Daniel Blake Smith.

(Courtesy: The Filmmakers)

One of the films at this month’s St. Louis International Film Festival is about the history of Cairo, Illinois, the southernmost town in the state.

Host Steve Potter talks with co-directors and filmmakers Nick Jordan and Jacob Cartwright of “Between Two Rivers.”  Potter is also joined by Stace England, the lead singer of Stace England and the Salt Kings.

England calls Cairo the most fascinating town in America, and a few years ago, came out with a CD highlighting the town.  

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(Courtesy: Cinema St. Louis)

The Whitaker St. Louis International Film Festival is one of the largest film festivals in the Midwest. 

In the coming weeks, more than 400 films will be screened and many of them will receive their only St. Louis exposure at the festival.

Host Steve Potter talks with Cliff Froehlich, the Executive Director of Cinema St. Louis, and filmmaker Frank Popper.

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