St. Louis Rams

new stadium, St. Louis Rams
Courtesy HOK | 360 Architecture

Nothing ventured ... a lot to lose.

That was the message from Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon Tuesday morning, as he touted efforts to build a new football stadium in St. Louis.

"If we do nothing, then we’re not an NFL city. If we do nothing then $10 million in taxes is gone. If we do nothing then people will stand right here 10 years from now and that will look exactly like it looks right there," Nixon said during a news conference on St. Louis’ north riverfront near the proposed stadium site.

St. Louis Rams owner Stan Kroenke is unhappy with the current state of the Edward Jones Dome. When the Rams moved to St. Louis in the 1990s, the contract stipulated that the stadium had to remain in the "top-tier" of other NFL facilities. The Dome is wide
Jason Rosenbaum, St. Louis Public Radio

The already murky future of professional football in St. Louis got a bit gloomier on Monday. 

Officials confirmed that the St. Louis Rams officially entered into a year-to-year lease with the St. Louis’ Convention and Visitors Commission. And the Los Angeles Times reported an Inglewood stadium plan had garnered 20,000 signatures – twice the amount needed to put the measure on the ballot. 

via Wikimedia Commons

Legislation that could make it harder to finance a new football stadium in St. Louis has been filed in the Missouri Senate.

Senate Bill 319, sponsored by state Sen. Rob Schaaf, R-St. Joseph, would bar the governor from extending existing bonds without approval from state lawmakers.

Bill Greenblatt | UPI | File Photo

Since St. Louis Rams owner Stan Kroenke announced a deal to build a stadium in Inglewood, California, the future of football in the Gateway City has been murky at best. 

HOK/360 Architecture

Missouri legislative leaders are showing little, if any, support for authorizing any state aid for a proposed new football stadium in St. Louis.

A task force appointed by Gov. Jay Nixon has unveiled plans for a 64,000-seat stadium between the Gateway Arch and the new Interstate 70 bridge with an estimated price tag ranging from $860 million to $985 million. 

Dave Peacock and Bob Blitz show off a drawing of a proposed stadium on St. Louis' riverfront.
Bill Greenblatt | UPI

When Dave Peacock stepped before a crush of reporters at Union Station last week, his main purpose was to showcase the potential of a new football stadium on St Louis’ riverfront. 

Part of his pitch was economic, which is a typical tactic to gather support for expensive sports facilities. After all, a new stadium could lead to thousands of construction jobs and continued business for surrounding bars and restaurants.

But for Peacock, there were more intangible reasons for the city to pursue the project — something beyond just dollars and cents.

Councilman Mark Harder, R-Ballwin
Jason Rosenbaum, St. Louis Public Radio

On this week's edition of Politically Speaking, St. Louis Public Radio reporters Jason Rosenbaum and Jo Mannies welcome the newest member of the St. Louis County Council -- Councilman Mark Harder. 

The Republican from Ballwin grew up in Normandy and eventually became a real estate professional. He was elected to the Ballwin City Council in 2011 and worked to mitigate the impact of a grocery store in the West County suburb.

Kevin Rejent
Provided by Mr. Rejent

After the announcement last week of a plan to build a stadium on the Mississippi riverfront, pundits and politicians were quick to react with assorted pros and cons.

Likewise, St. Louis Public Radio followers were eager to share, through the Public Insight Network, just what the plan — introduced by a team appointed by Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon — means to them.

Vince Schoemehl, former St. Louis mayor and president of Grand Center Inc., talks to 'St. Louis on the Air' host Don Marsh on Jan. 12, 2015, at St. Louis Public Radio in St. Louis.
Jason Rosenbaum I St. Louis Public Radio / St. Louis Public Radio

Weighing in on how to keep the St. Louis Rams from moving back to Los Angeles, former St. Louis Mayor Vince Schoemehl supports building a new stadium for the team. But the proposed location is wrong, he said.

Aerial View Looking Southwest Toward Downtown.
HOK | 360 Architecture

Updated at 4:30 p.m.

A 64,000-seat open-air NFL stadium constructed on St. Louis' riverfront could be the new home of the Rams -- or another NFL team -- by 2020, according to preliminary plans announced Friday.

Rams media

Discussion of Ferguson-related issues continued to simmer this week. Meanwhile, questions about the Rams’ future boiled into prominence.

Oddly, the two conversations are happening mostly in isolation from each other, even though both revolve around the same fundamental concern: How to create a future for our region that will make St. Louisans want to stay and newcomers want to come?

St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay talks to 'St. Louis on the Air' host Don Marsh on Jan. 7, 2015, at St. Louis Public Radio in St. Louis.
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio / St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis has an image problem that Ferguson either brought to light or didn’t help, depending on your perspective. St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay said addressing those image issues will take a lot of work.

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Amid reports that the team’s owner plans to build a stadium close to Los Angeles, Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon said a plan should be revealed this week that aims to keep the Rams in St. Louis. 

Paul Eaton of Piedmont burns a Rams sweatshirt during an event calling for a boycott of the team on Sunday in Imperial.
Stephanie Lecci

With the televisions at Gators South Beer and Wine Garden in Imperial set to anything but the Rams game on Sunday, Cathy Brown of St. Charles was tossing two Rams hats into a fire pit out on the bar's back patio.

"They are on their way to burning," she said, lobbing a Santa hat bearing a Rams logo on the pile. "Good-bye."

Brown was one of at least two dozen people who came to the bar to burn their Rams gear, as part of an event organized by a group of supporters of former Ferguson Police Officer Darren Wilson and law enforcement.

Rams media

The St. Louis Police Officers Association and the St. Louis County Police Association report progress following a meeting with leaders of the St. Louis Rams to discuss the public display by five players of the "hands-up-don't-shoot" gesture used by Ferguson protesters.

The St. Louis police group earlier had called the players’ actions “inflammatory’’ and anti-law enforcement.  The players were acting in support of Ferguson protesters, who have contended that Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson should have faced a trial after the fatal shooting of unarmed teenager Michael Brown.

via Wikimedia Commons

As St. Louis Rams owner Stan Kroenke considers whether to stay put or move his team to another city, Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon has unveiled a plan he says is designed to keep the NFL in St. Louis.

During a conference call with reporters Wednesday, Nixon announced that former Anheuser-Busch President David Peacock and Clayton attorney Bob Blitz will spend the next 60 days studying the situation:

via Wikimedia Commons

Rams fans can get their parking reserved in advance of Sunday’s game through a service called Parking Panda.

The company, which was founded in 2011 and provides parking services in 40 U.S. cities, arrived in St. Louis earlier this summer. It has agreements with the Rams and the Cardinals organizations.

Rams media

When Michael Sam finally got the call that the St. Louis Rams had drafted him, he turned to his partner, they embraced and kissed. This scene has played out every year during the NFL draft and rarely garners national attention. The difference this time is that Michael Sam is gay and he kissed his boyfriend.

Jess Jiang / St. Louis Public Radio

Michael Sam, the only openly gay professional football player, was introduced at a news conference at Rams Park Tuesday. 

Sam received unprecedented attention for a 249th pick in the NFL draft. He answered questions for nearly half an hour during the news conference. That's much longer than what even No. 2 draft pick, fellow St. Louis rookie, Greg Robinson, had to endure.

Rams Fans Rally Against Rumored Team Move

Apr 5, 2014

A group of St. Louis Rams fans rallied at Laclede’s Landing Saturday, calling on the city to do what it takes to keep the football team in St. Louis.

After the 2014 season, the Rams’ lease with the Edward Jones Dome will end and switch to a year-by-year lease unless expensive renovations are made. Negotiations continue behind the scenes to determine the extent of renovations and who will pay for them.

Rams media

Stan, baby, you’re busting my chops. Every time I write about your Rams and their on-going stadium contretemps, I go to great lengths to remind the readership that without you, the team would have never come to St. Louis in the first place. Back in the day, you were a civic hero.

Chris McDaniel, St. Louis Public Radio.

Expect to see a lot of ads leading up to September, paid for largely by one man. Libertarian Rex Sinquefield has given nearly $2.4 million to groups backing a possible cut to Missouri's income tax.

In response, Democratic Governor Jay Nixon has gone on the offensive, attacking the income tax bill and defending his veto.

Speaking in St. Louis to the Regional Chamber, Nixon said it is a "fiscally irresponsible experiment that didn't work in Kansas and won't work here."

via Wikimedia Commons

Updated to correct date of arbitrators' action, and again at 4:45 p.m. to include official letter.

The discussions between the St. Louis Rams and the St. Louis Convention & Visitors Commission over the Rams' place of play, the Edward Jones Dome, have come to a crossroads - one that may leave St. Louis without an NFL team after the 2014 season.

(via Flickr/Kevin Ward)

Those hoping to keep the Rams in St. Louis should not count on any help from Democratic Governor Jay Nixon or the Republican-led Missouri Senate.

When asked by reporters Monday about efforts to build a new stadium for the Rams, Governor Nixon said that the state is still paying half the cost of the Edward Jones Dome in downtown St. Louis.

“I don’t have a new stadium in this year’s budget, nor do I have any ongoing discussions on how to do that," Nixon said.

(Released by Mo. Atty. Gen. Chris Koster)

Updated 5:29 p.m. with comment from the CVC and addition of full arbitrators' report.

According to the St. Louis Convention and Visitors Commission, arbitrators have chosen the plan put forth by the St. Louis Rams for the revamping of the stadium in which they play, the Edward Jones Dome.

(Released by Mo. Atty. Gen. Chris Koster)

A panel of arbitrators in St. Louis is now weighing the future of the St. Louis Rams and the Edward Jones Dome.

The team and the owners of the dome, the St. Louis Convention and Visitors Commission, agreed to arbitration over plans to renovate the dome. The lease agreement requires the dome to be among the top quarter of all NFL stadiums by 2015 or the Rams can break the lease, raising concern they could leave St. Louis.

The arbitrators are two retired judges, one from Iowa and one from Colorado, and a labor attorney from Chicago. A ruling isn't expected for several weeks.

Flickr/Betterthaneveryone

There’s an end in sight to the years-long fight over upgrades to the Edward Jones Dome.

(via St. Louis Convention & Visitors Commission)

Updated at 2:40 p.m. with more details of the plan, expanded comments from CVC president Kitty Ratcliffe.

Will be updated.

The St. Louis Convention & Visitors Commission says it sent a new version of a plan to revamp the Edward Jones Dome to the St. Louis Rams.

The plan, which the CVC sent to the Rams on Friday,  is the latest salvo in the efforts by the CVC and the Rams to made the Edward Jones Dome a "top-tier" facility - generally thought to mean among the eight best stadiums in the National Football League. Without those upgrades, the Rams can break their lease on the Dome after 2015.

You can view the full proposal for yourself here:

via Wikimedia Commons

The St. Louis Rams announced today via their official Twitter account that they will not be playing a select number of home games in London in the 2013-2014 seasons:

Rams and CVC enter arbitration

The St. Louis Rams are heading to arbitration over what to do about the Edward Jones Dome. The St. Louis Convention and Visitors Commission, which runs the facility and leases it to the Rams, voted Thursday to begin the arbitration process. The two sides remain far apart on plans to upgrade the dome. The 30-year lease signed when the Rams moved to St. Louis from Los Angeles prior to the 1995 season requires the dome to be among the top quarter of NFL stadiums in 15 separate categories. If it isn't, the team can break the lease after the 2014 season. Negotiations began in February with the CVC proposing $124 million in improvements. The Rams countered with a much broader plan that city officials said could cost $700 million.

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