St. Louis

St. Louis City Hall
Richie Diesterheft | Flickr

The City of St. Louis has received $600,000 to provide homeless veterans with services.

The money will be split between the St. Patrick Center, which offers housing services, and Employment Connection which provides job training skills.

St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay says that as approximately 12 percent of the city’s homeless are veterans.

(via Flickr/davidsonscott15)

Updated at 3:19 p.m. June 8 to add information about murder charge

Previously we told you about a shooting just southwest of downtown St. Louis that left a seven-year-old girl in critical condition.

Sadly, according to the St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department, the shooting has taken a fatal turn.

(via Flickr/List)

A heat advisory is in effect in the St. Louis Public Radio listening area until 7 p.m. on Wednesday (June 8), but medical emergencies associated with the heat have already begun.

The St. Louis City Department of Health said that, as of Monday afternoon, there have been 12 heat-related EMS runs and eight heat-related hospital reports in St. Louis since Saturday (June 4).

St. Louis County also said that 17 people were treated for heat exhaustion over the weekend.

kevindooley via Flickr

The Missouri treasurer's office has returned $1.4 million in unclaimed property to a St. Louis area employer.

State Treasurer Clint Zweifel said the returned money is the second largest amount his office has returned from unclaimed property. He did not identify the employer.

The $1.4 million account was made up of more than 260 individual securities accounts. The largest single amount, $1.6 million, was returned in January 2010 to a person in the St. Louis area.

(Ettie Berneking/St. Louis Public Radio)

Urban gardening has found a stronghold in backyard and community plots and now, with some help from one organization, urban gardening is making its move into St. Louis schools.

(Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio)

The two state Senators who represent the bulk of St. Louis city are continuing to express concerns about a proposed state legislative district map that splits the city into a northern and southern half.

The city is currently divided along a line that travels roughly along Grand Avenue. That, says Democratic state Senator Robin Wright-Jones, makes both the districts very diverse.

The proposed map, she says, resets 40 years of battling racial divisions.

(St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department)

A 48-year-old north St. Louis man faces five felony counts for his role in a shooting just southwest of downtown that left a seven-year-old girl in critical condition.

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

Have you gotten a ticket from one of 51 red light cameras in the city of St. Louis?

If a new court ruling stands, you might not have to pay the $100 fine.

(Courtesy Nick Sargent)

Updated 4:30 p.m. May 23:

Severe weather hit the St. Louis area once again this season. Severe winds, hail and large amounts of rain all contributed to today's storm.

So far, this is what we know:

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

The federal Department of Housing and Urban Development has awarded the city of St. Louis $7.8 million to help redevelop the area around the city's last public housing tower for families.

Previously, parts of the St. Louis Public Radio listening area were under a tornado watch. This tornado watch has now been lifted.

For the latest updates from the National Weather Service, see this update page.

Joplin, Mo. was also hit particularly hard from this round of tornadoes and storms. Fatalities have been confirmed.

See previous updates after the break.

(via Flickr/DoNotLick)

St. Louis landmark Citygarden has been named the recipient of the ULI Amanda Burden Urban Open Space Award.

The award "celebrates and promotes vibrant, successful urban open spaces by annually recognizing and rewarding an outstanding example of a public destination that has enriched and revitalized its surrounding community," according to the award's website.

(via Flickr/Richie Diesterheft)

When the Ways and Means committee of the St. Louis Board of Aldermen meets, anything goes as far as topics.

Today, it was the Department of Public Safety's turn on the hot seat, and pensions, recruiting and jail escapes were on the minds of the committee members. Here's a sampling of their concerns:

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

Calling it a "matter of survival" for his agency, Missouri Department of Transportation director Kevin Keith unveiled a five-year restructuring plan this morning that will eliminate 1,200 jobs, close 135 facilities, and sell more than 740 pieces of equipment.

St. Louis' Joe Marrocco of Kaldi's Coffee is already a champion barista.  As the top scorer in the South Central regional competition earlier this month, Marrocco heads to the United States Barista Championships this weekend as a man to beat.  Nationals are underway in Houston, where competitors are judged on a number of factors, including taste, technical skills, and presentation.  We caught up with Marrocco during a recent practice session.

(via Flickr/seannaber)

Philip Morris USA and other major tobacco companies won a favorable verdict Friday in a lawsuit filed by 37 Missouri hospitals seeking more than $455 million for treating sick smokers.

Philip Morris USA was one of six tobacco companies involved in the lawsuit.

The hospitals had claimed cigarette companies delivered an "unreasonably dangerous" product and were seeking reimbursement back to 1993 for treating patients who had no insurance and did not pay their bills.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

Good morning! Here are some of today's starting headlines:

Fed. judge gives corps OK to break Missouri levee

A federal judge is giving the go-ahead to the Army Corps of Engineers' plan to intentionally break a Mississippi River levee in southeastern Missouri.

The break could happen as early as this weekend to spare a flood-threatened Illinois town just upriver. Friday's ruling in Cape Girardeau turns back Missouri's bid to block the corps from blasting a hole in the Birds Point levee in Mississippi County, just south of Cairo, Ill.

FEMA teams in St. Louis to assess damage from tornadoes

Apr 27, 2011
(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

Representatives from the Federal Emergency Management Agency are on the ground in St. Louis to assess the damage from last week's tornadoes. Their findings will be part of Missouri's request for Federal assistance.

FEMA investigators are gathering data on a variety of factors-including the number of displaced people, effects on the local economy, and how much property was uninsured.

Josh DeBerg is a spokesperson for FEMA. He says the main criteria for federal aid boils down to a question of resources.

city hall with flowers
File photo | St. Louis Public Radio

A budget that proposes laying off 20 city workers to help close a $30 million gap is in the hands of the St. Louis Board of Aldermen.

(via Flickr/comedy_nose)

Three new charter schools will open to St. Louis City residents in August.

Jamaa Learning Center will serve kindergarten through eighth grade, Preclarus Mastery Academy will enroll grades 5-to-12 and South City Prep for grades 5-to-12 will offer a year-round academic calendar.

Mayor Francis Slay announced the new charter schools this morning and said education is the number one issue in the City of St. Louis.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

The threat of severe weather has moved south and east of the St. Louis Public Radio listening area, though flood warnings remain in effect along many of the area rivers. The National Weather Service is also warning of possible flash flooding, and has issued an urban and small stream flood advisory until 1 a.m.

(St. Louis Public Radio)

U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo. announced today that St. Louis has been awarded a $4 million federal grant for public transportation upgrades.

The money will be provided jointly by the Department of Transportation and the Federal Transit Administration, according to a press release from McCaskill's office. 

So, how will St. Louis use the money?

The release states that the grants will be used to aid in the replacement of up to 12 buses in the Metro's current bus fleet.

A view of the outside of the Peabody Energy building in St. Louis.
St. Louis Public Radio

Peabody Energy Corp. says its profit rose in the first quarter due to higher prices for Australian coal used in steelmaking and increased demand in the U.S.

The world's biggest private-sector coal company says its net income attributable to common shareholders was $176.5 million, or 65 cents per share, in the January-March period. That's up from $133.7 million, or 50 cents, a year earlier.

St. Louis-based Peabody says first-quarter revenue rose 15 percent to $1.74 billion from $1.51 billion the previous year.

(via Flickr/mrwynd)

Green Sales Tax Holiday Begins in Missouri

The Third Annual Show-Me Green Sales Tax Holiday begins today and runs through April 25. Those wishing to purchase new Energy Star-qualified appliances in Missouri during the holiday will save at least 4.225 percent off the purchase, representing the elimination of the state's sales tax from the purchase, according to the Missouri Department of Revenue.

(via Flickr/Robert S. Donovan)

Motorists traveling around downtown St. Louis will see traffic backups and delays this weekend as the Missouri Department of Transportation is packing a laundry list of repairs into one, two-day stretch.

MoDOT is making a variety of lane and ramp repairs starting at Grand Boulevard and stretching to the Poplar Street Bridge.

The repairs come during the same weekend that 25,000 runners will be coming downtown for the GO! St. Louis Marathon.

Diana Venker is the area engineer for MoDOT.

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

Another incumbent alderman has lost his seat at City Hall.

Fred Heitert, a 32-year members of the Board of Aldermen and for many years its only Republican, lost his re-election bid by 48 votes to Democrat Larry Arnowitz, a longtime city employee.

(Adam Allington/St. Louis Public Radio)

Will be updated as more information becomes available

Firefighters in the city of St. Louis got some better news today.

The Federal Emergency Management Agency announced that the department will receive $3.2 million federal funds over the next two years in the form of a SAFER grant. (That stands for Staffing for Adequate Fire and Emergency Response.)

(via Flickr/puroticorico)

Updated March 30th

A spokesman for Comptroller Darlene Green says the Board of Estimate and Apportionment can only act on layoffs proposed by the St. Louis Fire Department. The meeting last week was the first time the Board had a proposal to consider, said John Farrell, even though the department's overspending had been evident for nine months.

Our earlier story:

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

On Tuesday, voters in St. Louis and Kansas City will have their first change to determine the future of their cities’ 1 percent earnings taxes, which are imposed on the wages of everyone who lives or works in the cities.

It’s on the ballot following statewide approval last November of Proposition A.

The lead-up to the vote has been very different in the two cities.

Today, we have two reports.

Maria Altman will look at how quiet the campaign has been in St. Louis.

But first, Maria Carter of KCUR reports that things have been much more heated in Kansas City.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

Missouri is one of a handful of states applying for some $2.4 billion in federal funding for high-speed rail projects that Florida rejected last month.

Governor Jay Nixon was in Kirkwood today to announce Missouri's application for nearly $1 billion in new funding.

In recent months, rail projects have  become politicized with many GOP lawmakers calling for states to refuse the funds.

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