STL Art Game-Changers

Eugenia Alexander, left, and Edna Patterson-Petty
Nancy Fowler | St. Louis Public Radio

Grandmas are moms with lots of frosting, the saying goes. And in the case of East St. Louis’ Edna Patterson-Petty and her granddaughter Eugenia Alexander, the frosting is artistically done.

Patterson-Petty is a fiber artist and art therapist. Alexander grew up enamored by her grandmother’s work, which includes an art quilt made for President Barack Obama’s 2009 inauguration.

Regional Arts Commission

St. Louis’ Regional Arts Commission  has released the names of 10 artists who will each receive $20,000 to help them pursue their work.

RAC named four visual artists, two dance/theater artists, one musician, one media artist and two literary professionals in its second round of awards (full list, below). They were chosen from among 180 applicants.

Bruno David
Provided by Bruno David

Bruno David Gallery in Grand Center will open a second location in St. Louis' Grove area, focusing on women artists.

The new spot, called Bruno David Projects, will be located at 1245 South Vandeventer Ave. Its first exhibit, which opens Oct. 30, will feature the work of local painter Cindy Tower.

Missouri Arts Council

How can we ensure that the arts thrive in Missouri during the next five decades? The Missouri Arts Council is embarking on a statewide tour to find out.

De Andrea Nichols
Stephanie Zimmerman | St. Louis Public Radio

When you attend an event involving De Andrea Nichols, be prepared to meet your match. Not your romantic soulmate, although that could happen. More likely, your partner in community engagement.

Nichols, 26, is a community arts organizer, designer and social worker who’s the Education and Outreach Coordinator at the Contemporary Art Museum. When she’s not working at CAM, she’s entrenched in one of the many projects of her own nonprofit, Catalysts by Design. Sometimes the twain does meet.

Work from four of the artists in the first CSA group, clockwise from left, Ray Nadine, Caroline Philippone, Matthew Paul Isaacson, Brandon Daniels
Images courtesy of CSA

An organization called Community Supported Art Saint Louis has named nine local artists to launch its new program.

The concept is as simple as a paint-by-the-numbers project: Fifty CSA “shares” are up for grabs at $300 apiece. Each share-buyer receives nine original works — one from each artist — at three “pick-up” events this September, October and November. Every artist walks away with $1,000 and wider exposure.

A recent show at the Contemporary Art Museum
Contemporary Art Museum

The Contemporary Art Museum in Grand Center has joined the ranks of St. Louis’ free cultural institutions, at least through next summer.

CAM has charged no admission fee since early May, thanks to a donation by the local Gateway Foundation, a nonprofit organization supporting art and urban design. Now Gateway has increased its funding to cover the five-dollar cost through August 2015.

Sarah Paulsen
Stephanie Zimmerman | St. Louis Public Radio Intern

The 2008 Kirkwood shooting that left six dead, including council member Connie Karr, stunned and forever changed the community. Now, artist Sarah Paulsen is finding deeper meaning in the tragedy.

Paulsen, 36, grew up in Kirkwood.  “Connie was a really good friend of my mother’s,” she said.

William Burton Jr.
Stephanie Zimmerman

The ousted 14th Street Artist Community Gallery has found a new home, just steps away from its former space and still on 14th Street.

Gallery owners have moved two doors down and across one street to 2607/09 14th St. in Old North St. Louis. The gallery, run by William Burton and Robert Ketchens, will retain its name. They plan a grand re-opening in July.

Stephanie Zimmerman | St. Louis Public Radio Intern

Stan Chisholm’s whole working-in-Styrofoam thing started with a need to keep moving.

Wood is heavy. Styrofoam is light. It can be broken into pieces and easily transported in a suitcase or even a backpack, especially important during his car-less time at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Its unconventionality also infuses a bit of dark comedy into Chisholm’s work.

“It’s kind of a parody,” Chisholm, 27, said. “I don’t know anyone who uses foam like me.”

Brett Williams
Stephanie Zimmerman | St. Louis Public Radio intern

What kind of music goes with a video of sitting on the toilet naked while eating peanut butter out of a jar? That question — back in the late 1990s — ultimately led St. Louis artist Brett Williams to the sound sculptures he creates today.

While at the School of The Art Institute in Chicago, Williams launched what he calls the Brett Commercials, a video series that includes “Brett Lives Alone,” featuring his bathroom snacking against a whistling-clanking soundtrack.

Jessica Baran and Galen Gondolfi
Stephanie Zimmerman | St. Louis Public Radio | File photo

Making art transforms artists. It can also revolutionize the world around them. St.

William Burton Jr.
Stephanie Zimmerman

Originally published Tuesday, May 13. Updated Friday, May 16 to include audio from Cityscape. Look for more STL Art Game-Changers in an upcoming series.

St. Louis artist and activist William Burton has a history of helping teenagers from unstable environments. Now Burton’s own outreach efforts are facing homelessness.