stl250

(photo illustration via Flickr user Tim Hamilton)

The birthday cakes are disappearing from St. Louis streets, and the Missouri History Museum’s 250 in 250 closes up shop this weekend. But here's a one-stop place to find — at any time — the stories inspired by St. Louis' big anniversary about what makes our area special.

We had fun with history

The Missouri History Museum is collecting postcards for a time capsule that will be opened in 50 years, for St. Louis' 300th anniversary.
Alex Heuer / St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis’ 250th anniversary celebration is wrapping up, and the city starts its 251st year this weekend.

While the 250th anniversary may have lacked the over-the-top pomp and circumstance of previous anniversaries, Cakeway to the West was a hit. Two hundred fifty-six cake sculptures, each 4 feet tall, were decorated by artists and scattered throughout the St. Louis region.

Dust will have to be carefully removed from the Spirit of St. Louis.
Jim Howard | St. Louis Public Radio

For the first time in more than 20 years, the Spirit of St. Louis, Charles Lindbergh’s beloved single-engine plane that carried him to fame and the $25,000 Orteig Prize in 1927, is back on the ground — sort of. 

The iconic piece of aviation history is now sitting on the floor in the main lobby of the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C.  Smithsonian experts will examine every inch of the plane, assess its condition, review and document previous repairs and address the continuing toll time takes on historic artifacts.

Wednesday's First Night celebration in Grand Center is the official end of St. Louis' yearlong 250th anniversary celebration, and will showcase St. Louis arts and artists. 

Alex Heuer / St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis’ yearlong 250th anniversary celebration will close Wednesday night with First Night in Grand Center.

As part of the festivities, a few STL250 cakes began arriving at the Public Media Commons on Monday morning. The Public Media Commons is located between St. Louis Public Radio and the Nine Network on Olive Street.

Two looks of Raja
Provided by the Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts

As our city rocked from the upheavals of 2014, a series of quieter changes was taking place in the St. Louis art world.

Several arts organizations debuted, others expanded and a few folded. Some relocated and others featured uncharacteristic fare to appeal to wider audiences. Here’s a look at eight of this year’s evolutions in the local arts scene.

at the post office s. grand 11.26
Rebecca Smith | St. Louis Public Radio

Since 1966, The Arch has represented St. Louis as the Gateway to the West. But it also has other connotations, especially now.

As St. Louis celebrates 250 years, several books have explored the city’s history. Add one more to the list, but this one tells the tales through timelines.

“St. Louis: An Illustrated Timeline” offers a tour through St. Louis’ past (and future, as the book ends in 2016) with vignettes for noteworthy years. It also has what author Carol Ferring Shepley calls a “wide-angle view” of the city.

(Courtesy: Linda Gurney)

Approximately 250 fiberglass cakes are scattered throughout the St. Louis region. They’re placed at notable locations to commemorate the 250th anniversary of the founding of St. Louis.

Sixty-seven of the cakes are part of an online auction that opened Monday and lasts through the end of the year. More may be added to the auction because each host location gets to choose what happens to their cake.

Rebecca Smith | St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis is a city built on immigration – from the early French settlers, to the Germans and Irish in the 1800s, to the more modern immigration of Bosnians and Southeast Asians.

While there have been numerous waves of immigration into St. Louis, the welcome extended by existing religious groups to new immigrants has remained fairly consistent throughout St. Louis' 250 year history.

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