stl250

Cityscape
8:03 pm
Fri June 27, 2014

The Sheldon Presents Photos Of St. Louis At 250 Years

Focus On St. Louis, 2013 (Amateur)
Nic Tullis

The Sheldon has its own way of celebrating St. Louis’ birthday. Its new exhibit "The City at 250: A Celebration of St. Louis in Photographs" stemmed from a city-wide photo contest the Sheldon launched with the Beacon (now part of St. Louis Public Radio) that received over 500 entries. Focusing on photos of the city as it is today, the exhibit is a companion to the Sheldon's “Imagining the Founding of St. Louis.” Together, they offer a then and now view for the city’s 250th celebration.

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Cormorants and ducks
8:30 pm
Mon May 26, 2014

The Big Bird Cage: Where The Saint Louis Zoo Took Flight After The 1904 World's Fair

A great egret strikes a pose in the Flight Cage at the Saint Louis Zoo.
Mary Delach Leonard|St. Louis Public Radio

The residents of the big birdcage aren’t as flashy or exotic as many of the 19,000 animals at the Saint Louis Zoo, but they do put on a show.

At ground level, a row of small ruddy ducks with bright blue bills follow the leader, making rippling curlicues in a swamp-like pond. Double-crested cormorants hang out on a wooden bridge, striking a pose with their outstretched wings, as visitors reach for their camera phones.   

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St. Louis on the Air
12:51 pm
Mon May 26, 2014

Encore: Historians Elaborate On Significance Of French Colonial St. Louis

A map of St. Louis from 1796.
Credit Courtesy Missouri History Museum

Holiday encore broadcast.

On Friday, February 14, 2014, The Missouri History Museum hosted “A Great City from the Start,” a one-day symposium commemorating the founding of St. Louis. The foremost experts on early St. Louis history spoke before an audience that included representatives from Quebec, France, Spain and the Osage Nation.

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St. Louis on the Air
10:21 pm
Sun May 11, 2014

Why ‘Meet Me In St. Louis’ Still Means So Much, 70 Years After Its Debut

Fans of the film "Meet Me In St. Louis" gathered for a sing-a-long and screening on May 2.
(Amanda Honigfort/St. Louis Public Radio)

The Judy Garland classic Meet Me In St. Louis had its world premiere in St. Louis on Nov. 22, 1944, but it still draws a crowd. On May 2, the Missouri History Museum hosted a Meet Me in St. Louis film screening and sing-a-long in conjunction with the film’s 70th anniversary and their 250 in 250 exhibit. 

Listen to what the film means to some of the fans attending the sing-a-long:

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Local History
5:17 am
Wed May 7, 2014

These Historical Photos Show How Much St. Louis Has Changed

1909: Balloons being inflated for the St. Louis Centennial balloon race, the signature event of a week-long celebration that marked the 100th year of the city's incorporation.
Oscar C. Kuehn / Missouri History Museum

To mark the 100th anniversary of St. Louis’ incorporation as a city, an imposing array of “gasbags” assembled at the edge of Forest Park in 1909 for the St. Louis Centennial balloon race.

(A bunch of politicians were there, too.)

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Photography
11:42 pm
Mon April 28, 2014

Photo Contest Winners Cast New Light On Arch, City Museum, Other STL Institutions

Ryan Archer, City Museum Climbers Entry Category: Professional-People
Photos provided by the Sheldon Art Galleries

The St. Louis area is crawling with photographic opportunities. Local professional Ryan Archer took advantage of one of them to win Best in Show in the Sheldon’s “The City at 250” photo contest.

Archer’s “City Museum Climbers,” entered in the “Events and People” category, garnered him $1,000 and a place in “The City at 250” exhibit, opening June 6. The competition was a collaborative effort of The Sheldon and the St. Louis Beacon, now St. Louis Public Radio. The Beacon merged in December with St. Louis Public Radio and is no longer a separate entity.

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History
9:38 pm
Thu April 24, 2014

10 Things To Know About Saint Louis, Himself, On His 800th Birthday

Statue of King Louis IX (also known as Saint Louis) on Art Hill in St. Louis' Forest Park.
Credit (photo illustration via Flickr user Tim Hamilton)

Friday is the 800th anniversary of the birth of St. Louis' namesake, King Louis IX of France. You might be familiar with Louis' silhouette from the prominent sculpture on Art Hill in Forest Park. You know, this one:

Pretty epic image, right? But we thought we'd give you a few more facts about the man, king and later, saint.

1. Louis was born in 1214.

What else was going on in the world then? The Emperor Xuanzong of Jin China was in tremendous conflict with Genghis Khan.

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St. Louis on the Air
12:00 pm
Thu April 24, 2014

What Did Explorers Lewis and Clark Do When They Got Back To St. Louis?

Meriwether Lewis (left) and William Clark.
Credit via Wikimedia Commons

Meriwether Lewis and William Clark are most famous for leading the expedition that began in St. Louis in 1804, took them up the Missouri River, over the Rocky Mountains to the west coast and back.

But their connection with St. Louis didn’t end there. In 1807, Thomas Jefferson appointed Lewis and Clark to leadership positions in the Louisiana Territory, with a home base in the St. Louis region.

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St. Louis on the Air
6:50 pm
Tue April 22, 2014

Upcoming Saint Louis Art Museum Exhibit To Showcase Artistic Legacy Of City’s Patron Saint

Leaf from the Morgan Picture Bible
Credit via Wikimedia Commons

For its contribution to the 250th anniversary of St. Louis, the St. Louis Art Museum is planning an exhibition showcasing the influence of Louis IX on the world of art. Louis IX, also known as St. Louis, is the city’s namesake.

At the heart of the exhibit will be a folio out of a picture Bible on loan from the Morgan Library in New York.

“We believe that the king, Louis IX, actually commissioned this Bible,” said St. Louis Art Museum curator Judy Mann.  “It is of such outstanding quality it had to have been a royal commission.”

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St. Louis on the Air
6:41 pm
Tue April 22, 2014

Why Is St. Louis Named After A French King Who Was Born 800 Years Ago?

Saint Louis, King of France by el Greco
Credit via Wikimedia Commons

How did a French king born in 1214 become the namesake of a city founded in the heart of the Americas 550 years later? The answer is woven into the fabric of St. Louis’ identity even now, as we celebrate the 250th anniversary of the city’s founding.

Friday marks the 800th anniversary of the birth of the city’s namesake: Louis IX, the only French king to become a saint.

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