Sunshine law

Flickr/Joe Buckingham

The Missouri House and Senate have each approved measures that would renew expired security exemptions to the open meetings and records law.

Both chambers voted Thursday to shield public buildings' security plans and law enforcement guidelines for terrorism incidents from public records requests. The two exemptions expired at the end of 2012.  State Representative Vicki Englund (D, Tesson) says the legislation will help protect children while at school.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

Gov. Jay Nixon is using his bully pulpit to push for the reinstatement of some exemptions to Missouri’s Sunshine Law.

The Democrat joined officers and commanders from several local police departments as well as school officials to ask lawmakers to make that a priority when they return to Jefferson City on Wednesday.

(Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio)

The Missouri Supreme Court heard arguments Monday in a lawsuit challenging the new State House redistricting map.

The map’s opponents raised similar objections as those who’ve challenged the congressional and State Senate district maps drawn up last year:  Like the Senate map, plaintiffs claimed, in written statements, that the six-judge panel that drew up the House map did so behind closed doors and thus violated the state’s Sunshine law.  Robert Hess, one of the attorneys defending the map, said the panel was not subject to the Sunshine law.