Terry Jones | St. Louis Public Radio

Terry Jones

Rici Hoffarth / St. Louis Public Radio

For the first time in 16 years, St. Louis is welcoming a new mayor into office.

The shift in power from Francis Slay to Lyda Krewson led Curious Louis participant and St. Louis native, Whitney Panneton to ask St. Louis Public Radio: What exactly does the mayor do?

Kelly Moffitt, St. Louis Public Radio

After the Ferguson Commission's report was released last week, St. Louisans across the region seemed to be echoing a common refrain: “But what can I do with it?” That was a question that “St. Louis on the Air” host Don Marsh tried to answer at Monday night’s public town hall “Ferguson Commission:  Where Do We Go From Here?”

Panel Analyzes Nixon's State Of The State Address

Jan 22, 2015
Gov. Jay Nixon speaks during last year's State of the State address. The governor's speech comes amid heightened scrutiny of his actions during the Ferguson unrest and unprecedented GOP majorities in the Missouri General Assembly.
Tim Bommel, House Communications

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon delivered his seventh State of the State address Wednesday night. On Thursday, “St. Louis on the Air” asked a panel to analyze the speech and the Republican response, starting with the headline they would have put on the speech.

“Nixon’s speech more subdued in places,” said Marshall Griffin, St. Louis Public Radio’s Missouri statehouse reporter.

Pasadena Hills Mayor Geno Salvati won election to his office in 2013 without opposition. It's fairly common for mayors and city council members to get elected without opposition in St. Louis County.
Jason Rosenbaum, St. Louis Public Radio

When Pasadena Hills Mayor Geno Salvati met with this reporter in April at the Ferguson Brewing Co., it was months before Ferguson became internationally known -- or turned into a hashtag.

Bill Greenblatt, UPI

Michael Brown’s death at the hands of a Ferguson police officer brought about an intense examination of the conduct, racial composition and “militarization” of local police departments.

But one topic that hasn’t been talked about that much is how elected representatives exert fairly little direct control over the region’s law enforcement agencies.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: The Democratic presidential nomination is now Sen. Barack Obama's to lose. That's the view of some political experts after watching Obama pull off a big victory against Hillary Clinton in the North Carolina primary on Tuesday and nearly upset her in Indiana where Clinton was a heavy favorite.

Though Clinton has vowed to continue her campaign, these political experts say nothing short of a major bombshell will prevent Obama from winning the nomination.