Tom Dempsey

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

The second half of Missouri's 2014 regular session is underway. Leaders in both chambers and from both parties remain focused on crafting a state budget and on easing the burden of the state's student transfer law — but they remain divided on expanding Medicaid.

Medicaid expansion a 'nonstarter'

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

The first half of Missouri's 2014 legislative session is over, and lawmakers have left Jefferson City for their annual spring break.

House Speaker Tim Jones, R-Eureka, touted the passage of several of his priorities, including photo voter ID legislation, conscientious objections to certain medical procedures, and ending the economic border war between Missouri and Kansas.  Jones told reporters Thursday he wants to push several issues when they return in a week and a half, including right-to-work legislation.

Jason Rosenbaum, St. Louis Beacon.

Every week, St. Louis Public Radio’s Chris McDaniel joins the St. Louis Beacon’s Jo Mannies and Jason Rosenbaum to talk about the week’s politics.

On this week's show, Senate President Pro Tem Tom Dempsey joins us to give a post-mortem of last week's veto session. The Republican goes into great detail on why he voted against the much-covered gun nullification bill, as well as what we can expect out of next year's session.

Follow Chris McDaniel on Twitter@csmcdaniel

File photo

Former Missouri House Speaker Steve Tilley, a Republican, donated $7,500 to Democrat Chris Koster last night. Koster has made very clear his interest in the Governor's office.

What's more, the donation comes just a few days after Koster pledged to give $400,000 to Democrats running for legislative seats in the next four years.

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri's legislative session has ended, with several issues resolved and several more that came up just short.  St. Louis Public Radio's Marshall Griffin takes a closer look at the final day, and at what happens now:

A few that didn't make it, and a few that did

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

The final week of Missouri's regular legislative session has arrived.  The Republican-led General Assembly and Democratic Governor Jay Nixon are pushing to get several things accomplished before Friday.  St. Louis Public Radio's Marshall Griffin tells us that the session, so far, has been one highlighted by partisanship and controversy.

Nixon vs. lawmakers, tax credit reform

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri Senate Republicans were visited Tuesday by Democratic Governor Jay Nixon.

As he did last week with House Republicans, Nixon pitched his proposal to expand Medicaid to an additional 260,000 Missourians next year.  He told reporters afterwards that it went well, and that much of the discussion focused on the alternate Medicaid package moving through the Missouri House.

Mo. Senate

The leader of the Missouri Senate is denying reports from some conservative bloggers that top Republicans are planning an about-face on Medicaid expansion.

In particular, Red State published a report Monday that President Pro-tem Tom Dempsey (R, St. Charles) and Senator Mike Parson (R, Bolivar) were backing a so-called “shell bill” that would be used to add Medicaid expansion to next year’s state budget.  Dempsey denies that report.

UPI/Bill Greenblatt

Democratic Governor Jay Nixon is using a new tactic in an attempt to persuade Republican state lawmakers to accept federal dollars to expand Medicaid: public safety.

On Monday, Nixon brought out St. Louis Police Chief Sam Dotson, who said expanding Medicaid to another 50,000 Missourians who need mental health treatment will improve public safety.

(via Flickr/Kevin Ward)

Those hoping to keep the Rams in St. Louis should not count on any help from Democratic Governor Jay Nixon or the Republican-led Missouri Senate.

When asked by reporters Monday about efforts to build a new stadium for the Rams, Governor Nixon said that the state is still paying half the cost of the Edward Jones Dome in downtown St. Louis.

“I don’t have a new stadium in this year’s budget, nor do I have any ongoing discussions on how to do that," Nixon said.

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