Tower Grove Park | St. Louis Public Radio

Tower Grove Park

Matt Ridings | Flickr

 

Tower Grove Park in south St. Louis will see some renovations and improvements over the next few years. Park officials are unveiling a 20-year master plan on Wednesday.

The park’s new master plan includes expanding and enhancing some of the more popular areas of the park, including the farmer’s market.

The park’s executive director, Bill Reininger, said more than 200 people attended an open house in January and over 1,200 people have made suggestions for the park’s renovations through an online survey.

(via Flickr/pasa47)

Officials at Tower Grove Park want to know how they can make the park more enjoyable and accessible to area residents. 

The 148-year-old park, which has long focused on fulfilling the legacy of philanthropist Henry Shaw, has hired Virginia-based landscape architecture firm Rhodeside & Harwell to lead the development of a master plan.

The long-term strategy likely will consider historic preservation, environmental conservation and accessibility for those with disabilities. However, park officials would like to hear from the public first to determine the direction it should take.

Ferguson Farmers Market

The oldest, still-operating farmers market in St. Louis, Soulard Farmers Market, has a history that stretches back over 200 years. But it is only in the past 15 that the local food scene has exploded across other municipalities in the region, bringing with it smaller markets and more opportunities for local growers to sell their produce and products.

Tower Grove Park

A new director is getting settled at Tower Grove Park in St. Louis for the first time in 28 years. St. Louis Public Radio’s Joseph Leahy spoke recently with Bill Reininger about his choice not to live at the director’s residence and his ideas for bringing new technology to the historic park.

Joseph Leahy / St. Louis Public Radio

At the end the year, Tower Grove Park in south St. Louis will replace its director for only the fifth time in its 146 year history.

St. Louis Public Radio’s Joseph Leahy recently took a tour of the park with outgoing Director John Karel as he prepares to turn over his stewardship and place of residence after nearly three decades.

INTERVIEW HIGHLIGHTS

Getting The Job

LEAHY: How did you come to be the director of Tower Grove Park?

Henry Shaw at his townhouse at 7th and Locust.
Provided by the Missouri Botanical Garden

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Nearly 155 years ago, businessman Henry Shaw opened the Missouri Botanical Garden on the hundreds of acres of prairie he'd previously purchased. With the help of pre-eminent naturalist Asa Gray, William Jackson Hooker, director of England’s Kew Gardens, and St. Louis resident Dr. George Engelmann, Shaw created a major and lasting institution.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: September 18, 2008 - Visitors won't be coming on streetcars to see the lily ponds in bloom as they once did. And more than likely, you won't see women in long dresses holding parasols and men in Victorian suits standing on lily pads.

But what you will find these days in the middle of historic Tower Grove Park are the same three lily ponds, newly revived after a $400,000-plus renovation. And they are looking as they did nearly a century ago when people rode streetcars to see them in full bloom, and some did pose for pictures standing on lily pads.

Streetcar "car-card" advertisement
Provided by Tower Grove Park

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon. - Visitors won't be coming on streetcars to see the lily ponds in bloom as they once did -- note the "car card" advertisement above that would have been posted on the interior of a United Railways Co. streetcar. And more than likely, you won't see women in long dresses holding parasols and men in Victorian suits standing on lily pads.

But what you will find these days in the middle of historic Tower Grove Park are the same three lily ponds, newly revived after a $400,000-plus renovation. And they are looking as they did nearly a century ago when people rode streetcars to see them in full bloom, and some did pose for pictures standing on lily pads.