Washington University

Microbiologist Mary-Dell Chilton works in her lab at Syngenta.
Syngenta

Mary-Dell Chilton pioneered the field of genetic engineering in agriculture.

She has spent most of her decades-long career working for Syngenta, where she founded the agribusiness company's research on genetically modified seeds.

But Chilton started out in academia. And it was here in St. Louis, at Washington University, that she led the team that created the first genetically-modified plants in the early 1980s.

A rendering of the micro-electrode that Washington University scientists have designed to be implanted into the stump of amputations and integrate with nerves.
courtesy Washington University

Scientists at Washington University have been awarded just under $1.9 million to test a device that could help people with prosthetic hands feel what they are touching. The funding is part of a larger project sponsored by the U.S. Defense Department.

Over the next three years biomedical engineering professor Dan Moran and his team will use the grant funding to test the device in macaque monkeys. If all goes well the device would then be tested on humans in clinical trials.

Adjunct instructors at Webster University have lost their bid to join a union. However, both the adjuncts and university officials who campaigned against the union say they will keep discussing the issues that prompted the effort.

Joining host Don Marsh were (from L to R) Vanessa Cooksey, Jason Purnell and Yemi Akande-Bartsch
Alex Heuer / St. Louis Public Radio

For the Sake of All” is an interdisciplinary project addressing the health and well-being of African Americans in St. Louis and St. Louis County that began in 2013. A collaboration of Washington University and Saint Louis University, the project issued five policy briefs illuminating major areas of concern. The first phase culminated in May 2014 with a final report outlining six recommendations.

Field of students at a graduation
(via Flickr/j.o.h.n. walker)

No one has ever mistaken Rolla, Mo., for Cambridge, Mass. But new college rankings place the schools in both towns on just about the same level.

The report from a unit of the Brookings Institution in Washington, D.C., is an attempt to determine how well colleges prepare students for high-paying careers.

Host Don Marsh was joined by (from L to R) Erica Barnell, Cliff Holekamp and Ian Schillebeeckx.
Alex Heuer / St. Louis Public Radio

Founded in 2013, IDEA Labs is a bioengineering design and entrepreneurship incubator at Washington University in which engineering and medical students work on unmet needs in healthcare to present entrepreneurial solutions.

Some of their primary objectives are to develop a culture of innovation at Washington University School of Medicine, and to teach engineering and medical students the skills and processes needed to invent and implement new biomedical technologies.

Washington University, Webster University, St. Charles Community College
St. Charles Community College, Flicker | Phil Roeder and Parick Giblin

Newly unionized adjunct instructors at Washington University prepared for their first negotiating session with the university this week, while adjuncts at Webster University get ready to decide whether they should organize as well.

And the organizing movement could soon spread to St. Charles Community College.

Candles are set out and numbered for each table's cadaver. Every candle was lit by students before the appreciation ceremony began.
Willis Ryder Arnold | St. Louis Public Radio

For almost a decade students from Washington University School of Medicine’s first year gross anatomy class have held a ceremony honoring their “first patients.” These patients are people who donated their bodies to the medical school for this purpose.

First year medical student, Jorge Zarate, 22, respects the knowledge he’s gained from learning anatomy from a cadaver and wants to honor the people who donated their bodies.

Dr. William Chapman, surgical director of Washington University and Barnes-Jewish Transplant Center
Alex Heuer / St. Louis Public Radio

April is National Donate Life Month, a time to remember the importance of organ and tissue donation, as more than 123,000 people are currently awaiting organ transplants in the United States.

U.S. Sen. Roy Blunt meets with people Feb. 20 at Washington University's Alzheimer's Research Center in St. Louis.
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

U.S. Sen. Roy Blunt says that he wants to use his key position on the Senate Appropriations Committee to boost funding for research.

The Republican senator recently became the chairman an Appropriations subcommittee that controls federal funding for the National Institutes of Health. He said during a visit to Washington University’s Alzheimer’s Research Center that he wants to make funding for the agency a priority.

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