St. Louis Public Radio
St. Louis residents gather at a Neighborhoods United for Change event. The SLACO Sisterhoods Initiative is an extension of this program.
St. Louis Association of Community Organizations

To bridge ‘Delmar Divide,' community program aims to get neighbors talking

A St. Louis nonprofit group is developing a program to bring neighbors from north and south St. Louis together. The St. Louis Association of Community Organizations hopes to officially launch their Sisterhood Initiative next year. The program will pair neighborhoods north and south of Delmar Boulevard for year-long working partnerships in an effort to bridge the so-called “Delmar Divide.”

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Congressman Mike Bost and St. Clair County State's Attorney Brendan Kelly are engaged in one of the most competitive congressional race in America.
Jason Rosenbaum I St. Louis Public Radio

Even though there are 434 other options, there may not be a more compelling House race in the nation than the contest for Illinois’ 12th Congressional District.

The contest between incumbent Republican Mike Bost and Democrat Brendan Kelly features two candidates with impressive track records of public service. While Republicans have gained ground in the district in recent years, the 12th District, which includes the Metro East, has a rich Democratic legacy and political infrastructure that gives Kelly a fighting chance.

Congresswoman Ann Wagner joins Politically Speaking once again to talk about her re-election bid in Missouri’s 2nd Congressional District.

The Ballwin Republican was first elected to represent the 2nd District in 2012. It encompasses parts of St. Louis, St. Charles and Jefferson counties.

Colorful photographs hang in the lobby at HCI Alternatives, a dispensary in Collinsville. (June 14, 2017)
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis Public Radio’s Jason Rosenbaum and Jo Mannies delve into the three medical marijuana initiatives.

Missourians will vote on Amendment 2, Amendment 3 and Proposition C. All three initiatives would make it legal to get marijuana for medical use. But they differ greatly in terms of how much marijuana will be taxed, how the regulatory framework would work, and where the money would go. Missouri state law says that if there are two conflicting constitutional amendments, the measure with the “largest affirmative vote” will prevail.

A Dutch historian is in St. Louis this week searching for information about 172 African-American soldiers who are buried or memorialized in the Netherlands American Cemetery, pictured here during a Memorial Day 2017 ceremony.
American Battle Monuments Commission

Some of the U.S. soldiers who helped liberate Holland in September 1944 during World War II never made it home, and many of them are buried or memorialized in the Netherlands American Cemetery. Those ranks include 172 African-American service members.

Dutch historian Sebastiaan Vonk's efforts to learn about their lives have taken him on a trip to St. Louis.

“There are a lot of veterans coming over each year [to the Netherlands], but the African-American veterans unfortunately have not been coming over a lot,” Vonk said on Friday’s St. Louis on the Air. “The stories are almost unknown. So that’s something that we, I guess you could say, want to get fixed and make sure that also their stories are told and also that their service is being honored.”

(L-R) Will Soll, Rachel Zolotov and Rabbi Brad Horwitz talked about showcasing Jewish arts and culture in St. Louis.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis has been home to a vibrant Jewish community for many decades. This weekend, an arts and culture festival will bring together various artists and musicians across the country to showcase Jewish talents, food and customs.

On Friday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh discussed the upcoming festival, billed as “Sababa.” It’s a joint effort by the St. Louis Jewish Community Center (The J), St. Louis Jewish Federation and other local organizations. Joining the conversation were artist Rachel Zolotov and musician Will Soll, both of whom are participating in the event. Rabbi Brad Horwitz, director of Jewish Engagement & Adult Programs at The J, also joined the program.

The International Institute in St. Louis helps immigrants to get settled, find housing and find jobs. Feb 2017
Marie Schwarz | St. Louis Public Radio

The International Institute of St. Louis has received a grant from the U.S. Justice Department to fund initiatives to address problems of labor and sex trafficking in the St. Louis region.

The grant will provide the institute with $250,000 annually for three years.

“The services available to victims includes everything from housing, supportive services, access to health care and general case management,” said Blake Hamilton, the International Institute’s vice president of programs.

Webster University's Jack Croghan (at left) and local attorney and soccer enthusiast Brian Howe joined Friday's talk show to provide analysis.
Jack Croghan and St. Louis Public Radio

On Friday’s episode of St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh went behind the headlines to discuss the mounting effort to bring a Major League Soccer team to St. Louis.

The decision to make a bid for an MLS team — spearheaded by two St. Louis families – has been attracting both local and national attention.

Joining Marsh for the conversation were Jack Croghan and Brian Howe.

Globalhack VII tackles challenges faced by local agencies that serve immigrant community.
Globalhack

Globalhack VII, a 48-hour hack-athon, returns to the Chaifetz Arena on the Saint Louis University campus this weekend with the goal to develop software to aid local agencies that serve immigrant and refugee communities in the region.

Matt Menietti, executive director of Globalhack, calls the event a “civic tech project.” More than 700 hackers are expected to participate in the event with $100,000 in prizes to be awarded to the best software solutions on Sunday.

The St. Louis nonprofit Prison Performing Arts has been putting on plays with incarcerated people for 19 years. Here, two women at the penitentiary in Vandalia, Missouri rehearse a scene from "Hip Hop Hamlet." 10/11/18
Jeremy D. Goodwin | St. Louis Public Radio

It’s opening night for “Hip Hop Hamlet” and more than 200 women dressed in baggy, khaki-colored clothes have packed into the gymnasium at the women’s penitentiary in Vandalia, Missouri. They’re eager to watch fellow members of the prison population perform a beat-filled, rap adaptation of the Shakespeare text.

Shakespeare scholars say his work offers ways to get in touch with what makes a person fully human. For the women participating in this show, that plays out at a very basic level.

As Missouri school districts await state test scores they should have received months ago, some administrators said they're getting frustrated with the delay.

“I don’t have the data right now for math and reading to even make a determination as to whether the things we invested in last year are making a difference,” Kansas City Public Schools Superintendent Mark Bedell said.

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St. Louis on the Air

Monday: Cornerstone Chorale and Brass' legacy in St. Louis, beyond

Host Don Marsh will talk with several members of the ensemble as its 29 members gather in St. Louis for five intensive days of rehearsal leading up to their month-long tour around the country.