St. Louis Public Radio

Top Stories

Legal medical marijuana
David Kovaluk | St. Louis Public Radio

Applications For Medical Marijuana Facilities Pour In At Deadline

With the deadline to submit an application for a medical marijuana business closed, more than 2,100 were received, bringing in more than $5.3 million in fees, according to the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services. On Thursday, the department announced it would extend the deadline to Monday at 4:30 p.m. Initially the cutoff was Saturday at midnight, but with a slow start early in the application period, the department expected an influx toward the end.

Read More

Living #Ferguson: 5 Years After The Killing Of Michael Brown Jr.

What has changed?

Listen to the voices of people who experienced #Ferguson and who are directly touched by the issues Michael Brown’s death laid bare.

Lisa Hoppenjans, Bill Freivogel and Mark Smith joined the Legal Roundtable.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

On Monday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Sarah Fenske convened the show's monthly Legal Roundtable.

Topics discussed include the sentence of former St. Louis County Executive Steve Stenger, a licensing dispute concerning a restaurant on The Hill, and the case of a man wearing body armor and carrying a rifle who caused panic at a Walmart in Springfield, Missouri.

Panelists also talked about the recent release of a Kansas City man who spent 23 years in prison for a crime he did not commit and an appellate court’s ruling that the Fox Theatre must provide captions to persons with hearing impairments.

The 70 Grand bus stops near St. Louis University in December 2018.
File Photo | Kae Petrin | St. Louis Public Radio

Riders who use Metro Transit experienced delays Monday morning. 

In a statement, Metro said "an unusually high number of MetroBus operators" were not on the job Monday and others did not accept additional duties. The organization said it has all available qualified employees driving buses, but that still isn't enough to cover the absences, resulting in delays.

Lance Pittman arrived at the Danville Correctional Center on Jan. 10 with multiple boxes of books, and bound printouts of articles and book chapters. Pittman coordinates a college in prison program called the Education Justice Project, which offers University of Illinois classes to a select group of men at the Danville prison. 

Horses cross the finish line at Fairmount Park Racetrack on July 23. The number of live races at the track will likely increase to 100 because of the gambling expansion bill passed earlier this year.
Eric Schmid | St Louis Public Radio

Fairmount Park Racetrack is filled with spectators on most Tuesdays and Saturdays, eager to watch horses fly down the dirt track.

But with just 41 live racing days this year, the stands at the Collinsville track remain empty far more days than they’re filled.

A recent gambling-expansion law in Illinois could change the track’s fortunes. Gov. J.B. Pritzker signed the bill in June, which was long-sought by the horse racing industry. Racetracks can now apply for licenses to host table games like blackjack and roulette, slots, video gaming and sports betting. 

St. Louis treasurer Tishaura Jones (left) directed a town hall discussion with Democratic presidential candidate Kirstin Gillibrand. AUGUST 18, 2019.
Kae Petrin | St. Louis Public Radio

Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, a Democratic presidential candidate, is promising to fight a Missouri law that bans most abortions at eight weeks of pregnancy. 

At a town hall meeting in St. Louis on Sunday, Gillibrand laid out her reproductive health care plan to Missouri politicians, voters, medical providers and patients. Her plan focuses on increasing federal protections for all forms of reproductive health care. 

State Auditor Nicole Galloway speaks at the Truman Dinner on August 17, 2019.
Jason Rosenbaum I St. Louis Public Radio

State Auditor Nicole Galloway is promising to take the fight to Gov. Mike Parson in next year’s gubernatorial contest, contending that Missouri Democrats are better equipped to solve state problems than the GOP.

Galloway’s speech at the Missouri Democratic Party’s Truman Dinner on Saturday in St. Louis was her first major address since announcing her bid for governor Monday. Her party is trying to bounce back after three dismal election cycles in a row.

Jonathan Ahl | St. Louis Public Radio

Small towns love their high school football team. 

So much so, that every year around this time there are scam artists who try to prey upon that pride to get money from local businesses.

The scam works like this: An out-of-town printing company calls businesses saying it is printing items to promote the high school team, and asks them to be sponsors by buying an ad. 

But the money doesn’t go to support the team, and the items may never be printed.

The first-ever Sans Bar STL event drew a large crowd to the Third Degree Art Factory, despite a conscientious lack of booze.
Meredith Marquardt

From its early Lemp Brewery days to the Schlafly era and beyond, St. Louis has earned its reputation as a drinking town. But lately the city is also seeing a nightlife trend that doesn’t involve alcohol at all.

Among other beverage and restaurant industry professionals, the people behind WellBeing Brewing, a locally based company that exclusively makes non-alcoholic craft beer, have helped to catalyze the movement. So has the Wellness Council of St. Louis, which is affiliated with the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Abuse and oversees Sans Bar STL.

The inaugural Sans Bar STL event early this year drew about 300 people to Third Degree Glass Factory for a night of music, glassblowing, tarot card readings and handcrafted alcohol-free drinks.

Former St. Louis Economic Development Partnership CEO Sheila Sweeney walks out of court after being sentenced to three years probation and fined $20,000 for her role in a corruption scheme. Aug 16, 2019
Ryan Delaney | St. Louis Public Radio

Updated at 4:50 p.m. Aug. 16 with comments from attorneys —

Sheila Sweeney, the former chief executive of the St. Louis Economic Development Partnership, has been sentenced to three years' probation and fined $20,000 for her role in a corruption scheme orchestrated by then-St. Louis County Executive Steve Stenger.

Sweeney admitted in May that she knew Stenger was trying to steer county contracts to a campaign donor and did nothing to stop it. Sweeney helped that donor, John Rallo, get a $130,000 marketing contract, even though he had no relevant experience. She also maneuvered to make sure that Rallo’s real estate company was able to purchase two pieces of industrial property near the St. Louis County and Municipal Police Academy. 

Jamaiyah Redmond and Chloé Guerin, both Clayton High School juniors, while listening to classmates call for school safety improvements Friday, Feb. 23, 2018.
File Photo | Ryan Delaney | St. Louis Public Radio

During the first week of the school year, St. Louis Public Schools didn’t just deal with summer learning loss – it started classes without several of its students.

“We have a 7-year-old who will not be starting school today,” said the St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department’s Mary Warnecke, who spoke with reporters on Tuesday. “We have a 10-year-old murdered not that long ago, in the city of St. Louis, who will not be starting school today. We have a 2-year-old murdered on Ferris not so long ago. We have a 3-year-old who was murdered on Michigan not so long ago.”

Pages

St. Louis on the Air

Tuesday: Court's Ruling On Juvenile Sentencing Parole Process

Host Sarah Fenske will talk with Amy Breihan of the MacArthur Justice Center.

Sharing America: Profiles

A series about women of color doing local work that highlights an issue of national importance.