St. Louis Public Radio

Top Stories

In the past two decades, the federal government took in $36.5 billion in assets police seized from people, many of whom never were charged with a crime or shown to have drugs.
David Kovaluk | St. Louis Public Radio

St. Charles County Law Enforcement Reaps Benefits Of I-70 Cash Seizures

This story is part of a collaborative-reporting initiative supported by the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting. All stories can be found here: https://taken.pulitzercenter.org/ Law-enforcement agencies in St. Charles County got a budget windfall of more than $1 million in 2017. The unplanned money wasn’t the result of higher taxes or donations, but instead came from a court process known as civil asset forfeiture.

Read More

Taken: How Police Profit from Seized Property

Missouri police have spent money acquired through civil asset forfeiture on expenses including renovated jails, new police cars, exercise equipment, courtrooms, military equipment and helicopter equipment.
David Kovaluk | St. Louis Public Radio

No Drugs, No Crime And Just Pennies For School: How Police Use Civil Asset Forfeiture

This story is part of a collaborative-reporting initiative supported by the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting. All stories can be found here: https://taken.pulitzercenter.org/ In the past two decades, the federal government took in $36.5 billion in assets police seized from people on America’s roads and in its poorer neighborhoods, many of whom never were charged with a crime or shown to have drugs.

Read More
Caitlyn Collins, author of "Making Motherhood Work: How Women Manage Careers and Caregiving," discussed the role of public policies in improving the the balance needed to accommodate the two roles of motherhood and career.
Lara Hamdan | St. Louis Public Radio

Issues on the forefront for women in the workplace include wage equity and advancement opportunities. More conversations are now encompassing the balance needed to accommodate the two roles of motherhood and career.

On Monday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh talked with Caitlyn Collins, author of "Making Motherhood Work: How Women Manage Careers and Caregiving." The newly released book looks at working mothers' daily lives and the revolution in public policy and culture needed to improve them.

Collins, an assistant professor of sociology at Washington University, compared policies in the United States with other well-developed countries such as Sweden, Italy and Germany – and found staggering differences in cultural attitudes towards child care.

Ameren

Although Jasper Swindle was working in a coal mine by Wyoming’s border to Montana three years ago, the Missouri native said he was curious about what it would be like to work “on the other side, for once.”

He was particularly interested in installing solar panels.

“Even when I was a coal miner, I always thought it was cool how you can harness the power of the sun,” he said.

Rachel Lippmann (left) and William Freivogel discussed the way in which police departments use civil asset forfeiture as well as its legal implications on "St. Louis on the Air."
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

On Monday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh delved into the way in which police departments use civil asset forfeiture as well as its legal implications.

Joining the discussion were St. Louis Public Radio city politics reporter Rachel Lippmann and legal expert William Freivogel, who is a professor at Southern Illinois University – Carbondale.

Alderwoman Megan Green, D-15th Ward, poses in St. Louis Public Radio's green room on Jan. 24, 2019
Ryan Delaney | St. Louis Public Radio

Alderwoman Megan Green, D-15th Ward, has done a lot of campaigning over the last 29 months.

Between October 2014 and April 2017, Green ran in three elections to secure a full term representing the ward, which covers parts of the Tower Grove South and Tower Grove East neighborhoods. Pretty soon after that last election, she set her sights on higher office. In the race for president, her main opponents are incumbent Lewis Reed and State Sen. Jamilah Nasheed, D-St. Louis. (You can find Reed’s episode of Politically Speaking here, and Nasheed’s episode here.)

Every month, Jocelyn Garner reports to Eastern Missouri Alternative Sentencing Services for a bond supervision check-in that costs her $30. Garner is awaiting trial on charges filed nearly a year ago.
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

Once a month, Jocelyn Garner steps off a bus and walks into a dimly lit waiting room in the Dutchtown neighborhood of St. Louis. Her name is called, and an office worker jots down her personal information and asks if she’s staying out of trouble.

The visits take less than five minutes and cost her $30. Her payments go to Eastern Missouri Alternative Sentencing Services, a private company based in St. Charles that tracks and monitors people awaiting trial in St. Louis. She’s made these trips since September.

This image is believed to be the only know image of the old Stars Park that stood in St. Louis in the 1920s.
Missouri Historical Society

A rare find by a Missouri Historical Society archivist is proving to be a valuable link to a chapter of St. Louis’ baseball history from nearly a century ago. It’s the only known image of Stars Park, a baseball stadium that was home to a Negro National League team in St. Louis.

Creative Reaction Lab was one of the first winners of the stARTup Creative Competition 2/17/19
Arts and Education Council

Calling all arts entrepreneurs in the St. Louis region: the third-annual stARTup Creative Competition is underway. A $20,000 prize is at stake.

The Arts and Education Council devised the contest to give a boost to new ventures.

Either one winner will receive $20,000, or two will split it. The prize also includes work space in Arts and Education Council’s arts incubator at the Centene Center for the Arts in Grand Center, including internet access and other logistical support.

This story has been updated to include statements from Missouri Sen. Josh Hawley and Rep. Sam Graves.

For the most part, the reactions of Kansas' and Missouri's congressional delegation to President Donald Trump's emergency declaration Friday fell along party lines.

The day in 2012 that a gunman killed 27 people and then himself in Sandy Hook, Connecticut, he didn't just use a semi-automatic rifle. The shooter had an array of handguns, shotguns and rifles, along with hundreds of rounds of ammunition.

The Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting shocked the nation, spurring new conversations about banning so-called assault weapons and magazines that could hold dozens of rounds.

A group known as Better Together is proposing a plan to merge St. Louis and St. Louis County. They're planning to get the measure on the 2020 ballot.
David Kovaluk | St. Louis Public Radio

The St. Louis Public Radio newsroom has been fielding a wide range of questions from listeners the past few weeks concerning Better Together’s recently unveiled proposal for a reunification of St. Louis and St. Louis County.

On Friday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh and several STLPR journalists provided answers to a number of those Curious Louis queries that haven’t already been answered – and took additional questions from listeners as well.

Pages

St. Louis on the Air

Tuesday: Teens Are Vaping More, Even As Many Steer Clear Of Other Substances

Host Don Marsh will lead a discussion in light of a recent study of American teenagers that showed a big jump in nicotine vaping in 2018.

Curious Louis Answers Your Questions About The St. Louis City-County Merger Plan

Readers have submitted dozens of questions about Better Together's proposal to unify St. Louis and St. Louis County. We'll answer as many as we can in the weeks and months ahead.

Fixed Odds: Problem Gambling in America

'Fixed Odds' explores the impact of problem gambling on communities of color and the extent to which states provide money for problem gambling treatment.