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Art

Why Are Young St. Louisans Embracing Modern Art?

Jul 18, 2014
Kodner Art Gallery

Modern art and furniture is getting its due (again) as collectors return to the styles made popular in the early 1900s through about 1970.

“Young collectors have become very eclectic,” said Stephanie Stokes, manager at the Kodner Gallery. “People appreciate vintage.”

The “Modernism: Art + Design” exhibit at Kodner Gallery in Ladue features modern paintings, drawings, sculptures and furniture. Stokes described the modern movement as artists’ reactions to a changing world.

Ralph Lowenbaum
Provided by the family

Ralph Lowenbaum didn’t get a news obituary either in the morning paper or here at St. Louis Public Radio. News editors, rightly, ask “What did he or she do?” and they’re not easily swayed by exaggerations or social or professional associations. The bar is high, and those who don’t clear it don’t make it.

By traditional measurements, reinforced by general perceptions of Mr. Lowenbaum’s 89½ years, the answer to “what did he do” would be “not much.” Turns out, that was wrong.

A recent show at the Contemporary Art Museum
Contemporary Art Museum

The Contemporary Art Museum in Grand Center has joined the ranks of St. Louis’ free cultural institutions, at least through next summer.

CAM has charged no admission fee since early May, thanks to a donation by the local Gateway Foundation, a nonprofit organization supporting art and urban design. Now Gateway has increased its funding to cover the five-dollar cost through August 2015.

Provided by CAM

Felines are fickle subjects when it comes to video (and almost everything else).

The reclusive stars that rule my home scoff at commands to do something cute for the camera. Plus, their 23-hour-a-day sleep schedule leaves only a small window for any possible action shots of bathing, eating or chasing the elusive red dot. What would Frank Capra do?

Brett Williams
Stephanie Zimmerman | St. Louis Public Radio intern

What kind of music goes with a video of sitting on the toilet naked while eating peanut butter out of a jar? That question — back in the late 1990s — ultimately led St. Louis artist Brett Williams to the sound sculptures he creates today.

While at the School of The Art Institute in Chicago, Williams launched what he calls the Brett Commercials, a video series that includes “Brett Lives Alone,” featuring his bathroom snacking against a whistling-clanking soundtrack.

Louis Brodsky
Provided by the family

Louis Daniel Brodsky, a stunningly prolific writer who composed nearly 12,000 poems, including more than 350 on the Holocaust, has died.

When Mr. Brodsky decided to become serious about his poetry, he committed himself to writing a poem every day of his life.

“He worked at being a poet,” said Eugene Redmond, professor emeritus of Southern Illinois University Edwardsville and poet laureate of East St. Louis. “Lou went to work like a physician, like a person who worked in a coal mine, like a janitor, like a math teacher. It was amazing.”

Courtesy of Duane Reed Gallery

The very first thing that has to take place before a person can find a visually appealing show is for the artist to have the means to create.

Jessica Baran and Galen Gondolfi
Stephanie Zimmerman | St. Louis Public Radio | File photo

Making art transforms artists. It can also revolutionize the world around them. St.

Compton Hill Water Tower
Wikipedia

Some of the art in St. Louis is available all day every day but may not be open to explore, This Friday night, however, by the light of a full moon, you can climb the 198 steps to the top of the Compton Hill Water Tower.

This is the youngest (built in 1898) of the city’s three historic and distinctive standpipe water towers. The others are the Corinthian column (1871) at 20th Street and Grand Avenue and the Bissell Water Tower (1885) at Bissell Street and Blair Avenue.

Art&Air Fair Returns To Webster Groves

Jun 6, 2014

The Art&Air Fair is back on the grounds of Eden Theological Seminary for an 11th year this weekend. Opening tonight and running through Sunday, June 8, the fair is hosting 115 artists from across the country. The artists are entered in a juried competition for best in show and other award categories. Local musicians and restaurants will also be featured to complete the festival atmosphere.

Courtesy PHD Gallery

Updated following "Cityscape"

A couple of months ago, PHD Gallery owner Philip Hitchcock hesitated before pressing “Send” for his mass email soliciting selfies for an art exhibit.

“What if I do this big launch and the returns come back low?” Hitchcock said. “I was really, really nervous about it.”

But once he got a handful of “yes” responses, he figured he could use them as leverage.

“I could say, for instance, to Philip Slein, ‘Hey, Duane and Bruno are doing it, and Leslie Laskey and Roseann Weiss,'" Hitchcock said. "And it started to get legs.”

Provided by SLUMA

The first weekend in June always has a star on my calendar: Lafayette Square House Tour. But many others have noted the better-than-average chance for good weather that prompted the neighborhood to select that date. Add the tradition of galleries being open in the evening on the first Friday of the month and no one has an excuse to stay indoors (barring storms, that is).

Linda Dubinsky Skrainka
from her website

Linda Skrainka, whose brush strokes reflect everyday life and transform the banalities into large, exquisite tributes to architectural stasis, nature and ordinary moments in time, died yesterday morning.

Her oil paintings are imbued with minute details that human eyes often fail to register, making them a treasure of rediscovery. They are also, often, literal reflections as Mrs. Skrainka painted shadows and mirrored surfaces to create pictures within pictures.

St. Louis Museums Offer Innovative Job Training

May 29, 2014
TMS class of 2012 in Contemporary Art Museum receiving room.
Provided by CAMSTL

If someone were to tally the number of St. Louis area students participating in career training at arts institutions and compare that to the numbers in other local industries, the arts might possibly win. The Contemporary Art Museum, alone, draws hundreds of students into its pre-professional programming each year. And not only are the exciting, pre-professional youth programs at CAM and the St. Louis Art Museum free to participants, some pay a stipend.

Mary Delach Leonard | St. Louis Public Radio

A unique art show that opens Friday at the Clayton Fine Art Gallery shows what can happen when young art students get a chance to work with St. Louis art professionals.

“The Blooming Artists Project” will display student artwork side by side with the work of their mentors — local jewelers, sculptors, painters, fiber artists and photographers.

Photo courtesy Stephen Garrett Dewyer

White Flag Projects will present a high profile performance Thursday, May 22, that has garnered criticism for featuring a young, black, female artist named Donelle Woolford as the fictional persona of white, male artist Joe Scanlan.

Artist William Burton Jr. looks around in his former gallery in North City's Crown Square.
File Photo / Stephanie Zimmerman / St. Louis Public Radio

Originally published Tuesday, May 13. Updated Friday, May 16 to include audio from Cityscape. Look for more STL Art Game-Changers in an upcoming series.

St. Louis artist and activist William Burton has a history of helping teenagers from unstable environments. Now Burton’s own outreach efforts are facing homelessness.

Sarah Hermes Griesbach

Deo Deiparine is the founder, director, curator and whatever else is needed at the Free Paarking Gallery in South St. Louis. The 21-year-old Washington University architecture student exemplifies the multitasking art-worlder archetype. Such entrepreneurial art leadership may be the best and only way to enter and stay in such an underfunded field. His gallery is now hosting its fifth exhibition since opening in August 2012.

examples of Laumeier art fair art
Laumeier Sculpture Park

Got Mother’s Day plans? Maybe a backyard barbeque? Gardening? Enjoying the flowers at the Botanical Garden?

One St. Louis  Mother's Day weekend tradition is the Art Fair at Laumeier.

You don’t have to wait until Sunday to go out to the sculpture park, as the event starts Friday. In fact, if you are there Friday or Saturday, you might find the perfect Mother’s Day gift from among the 150 artists who have been selected for their work in ceramics, fiber/textiles, glass, jewelry, mixed media, painting, photography/digital, printmaking/drawing, sculpture and wood.

Firecracker Press

This weekend the St. Louis Mercantile Library at the University of Missouri-St. Louis is hosting its 8th Annual Fine Print, Rare Book & Paper Arts Fair. Vendors and dealers will be set up in the J.C. Penney Building Saturday May 3 and Sunday, May 4, with a benefit preview this evening.

St. Louis Outsider Art Fair Welcomes All

Apr 27, 2014
St. Louis Outsider Art Fair

At its core, the St. Louis Outsider Art Fair is less about art insiders and outsiders than it is about belonging. Shana Norton has organized and grown this inclusive art event over the past three years. This year the fair is sponsored solely by the nonprofit organization Resources for Human Development – Missouri (RHD-MO).

Pam Hogg, Black dress with collar
Courtesy of Pam Hogg

Let’s start with the assumption that this weekend will actually be the start of spring. It does not matter what the calendar says, that really was frost a few days ago.

And perhaps you have extra family around because of Easter or Passover. Here a couple of ideas to get everyone out of the house.

Aaron Williams

When St. Louis attorney recruiter Aaron Williams became interested in croquet 30 years ago, it was about partying, not poetry. Getting some friends together to play croquet in Forest Park was just “something to do.”

“It was an opportunity for everyone to wear white and bring a bottle of champagne,” Williams quipped.

gigantic eyeball sculpture
Laumeier Sculpture Park

Updated  Thursday, April 10 to include material from St. Louis on the Air.

As home to works such as Eero Saarinen’s “Gateway Arch” and Richard Serra’s “Twain” and to places such as Laumeier Sculpture Park and Citygarden, St. Louis has established itself as a formidable player in the public sculpture arena. This reputation is likely to be bolstered by the Monument/Anti-Monument Conference here from April 10-12. It is part of the Sculpture City St. Louis 2014 initiative.  

Wole Soyinka
Wikipedia

An international flare can be found in St. Louis this week.

The Black Rep is presenting “The Trials of Brother Jero” as its last offering of the season. The show will run April 9-27 at the Emerson Performance Center at Harris-Stowe State University. For details and information go to the website www.theblackrep.org/.

Provided by the production

Ah, first Friday and galleries are open. There are lots of things to see, including Carmon Colangelo and others at Bruno David, Maurice Meredith at Portfolio, Gail Cassilly at the Bonsack and the formal opening of the Shearburn Gallery. The Vaughn Center is hosting the Faces Project, which showcases portraits of child victims of gun violence.

Hap Phillips and Nita Turnage’s work can be seen at SOHA Studio and Gallery; and the Creative Exchange Lab is putting up a show that examines the redevelopment of Old North St. Louis.

New Luminary Takes Shape On Cherokee Street

Mar 30, 2014
James and Brea McAnally in the work in progress at the new Luminary Center for the Arts.
Nora Ibrahim | St. Louis Public Radio Intern

In the heart of Cherokee Street, 2701 to be exact, The Luminary's new building is rapidly transforming.

The art gallery, incubator and performance venue (formerly the Luminary Center for the Arts) is moving from Reber Place into a 17,000 square-foot space that takes three different properties and melds the historic with the modern.

In only two weeks, a stage, office spaces and wall frames were erected. Over the next two weeks, the construction crew will install drywall and paint. And while its new location undergoes swift changes, The Luminary itself is rebranding.

What Pictures Do St. Louis Data Paint? We're About To Find Out

Mar 27, 2014
Jer Thorp
Stephanie Zimmerman | St. Louis Public Radio Intern | File photo

In 2009, Jer Thorp noticed that quite a few people were tweeting the words “Good Morning.”

Courtesy of Tokyo Institute of Technology

The Kemper Art Museum is hosting the very interesting “On the Thresholds of Space-Making: Shinohara Kazuo and His Legacy.” The exhibit, which runs through April 20, includes photos, original drawings and sketches. It is the first U.S. museum exhibit on an architect who helped reinvent architecture in Japan.

Jazz Player II Acrylic on canvas. 1990. Artist: Wadsworth A. Jarrell
Provided by SLUMA

Art historian and curator Adrienne Childs will lead a discussion on the details and history of the artwork in “Tradition Redefined: The Larry and Brenda Thompson Collection of African American Art” at 7 p.m., Tuesday, March 25, at the Missouri History Museum. She will also talk about the artwork at 11 a.m. March 25 at the Saint Louis University Museum of Art. The exhibit runs through May 18. Included in the exhibit are more than 60 works from such artists as Romare Bearden, Thelma Johnson Streat and Wadsworth Jarrell.

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