Bill Freivogel | St. Louis Public Radio

Bill Freivogel

Legal experts Brenda Talent (at left), Bill Freivogel (center) and Mark Smith joined Wednesday's show.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

From the continuing drama surrounding abortion access in Missouri to the investigation of St. Louis Metropolitan Police officers whose racist Facebook posts have been in the spotlight, this month’s Legal Roundtable had much to consider during Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air.

The conversation touched on a variety of the latest regional as well as national news stories that bring up questions related to sunshine law, the First Amendment and other legal matters.

(L to R) Legal experts Bill Freivogel, Rebecca Hollander-Blumoff, and Mark Smith discuss the latest legal news.
EVIE HEMPHILL | ST. LOUIS PUBLIC RADIO

On Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh and a panel of experts considered some of the numerous local and national legal stories unfolding this week.

In addition to offering analysis of the latest developments surrounding President Trump’s Supreme Court nomination of Judge Brett Kavanaugh and the ongoing investigation by Robert Mueller, they took a look at several key lawsuits and legal battles taking place closer to home.

This month’s Legal Roundtable panel included:

(L to R) Legal experts Bill Freivogel, Michael Wolff and Mark Smith discussed the legal implications of Gov. Greitens' resignation.
Alex Heuer | St. Louis Public Radio

On Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh discussed the political and legal fallout surrounding Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens' resignation.

Joining him was St. Louis Public Radio statehouse reporter Marshall Griffin and several legal experts.

Along with the Greitens saga, the legal panel also touched on several other current issues pertaining to the law.

On the panel:

Gov. Eric Greitens' defense team outside the Carnahan Courthouse in downtown St. Louis following a hearing. March 26, 2018.
File photo I Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

On the latest edition of the Politically Speaking podcast, St. Louis Public Radio’s Jason Rosenbaum, Jo Mannies and Rachel Lippmann break down all of the developments in the legal and political saga of Gov. Eric Greitens.

This week’s episode zeroes in on St. Louis Circuit Judge Rex Burlison’s decision to have a jury, rather than himself, decide whether Greitens is guilty of felony invasion of privacy.

Richard Dudman in 2014.
Family photo provided by Bill Freivogel

Earlier this month, longtime journalist Richard Dudman passed away at the age of 99.

Dudman led the Washington Bureau of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch from 1969 to 1981. In 1970, he was captured in Cambodia while reporting and held for 40 days. He wrote about the Kennedy assassination, the Bay of Pigs invasion, the Vietnam War, the Pentagon Papers and more.

On Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh talked about the life of Dudman with Bill and Margaret Wolf Freivogel, two people who knew him well.

Aine O'Connor | St. Louis Public Radio

On Monday, “St. Louis on the Air” host Don Marsh led a legal roundtable to talk about local and national legal issues pressing our region today. Uber and anti-trust law were a big focus of the hour, along with the legal implications of the Ferguson Commission’s recommendations, the possibility of minimum wage increases in Missouri, police use of force, the Kim Davis saga and more.

Listen here for the full rundown:

State Sen. Maria Chappelle-Nadal, D-University City, points to a sign last August in Ferguson. Chappelle-Nadal was one of the many political figures who felt transformed by Michael Brown's death.
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

William Freivogel, professor of public policy at SIU-Carbondale, recently labeled the widespread use of social media following the death of Michael Brown as “America’s Arab Spring.”

The international parallels are clear: a swell of ‘citizen journalists’ live-tweeting, streaming, and blogging protests and confrontations; Internet-based organization and galvanization of grassroots movements; and the use of social media as an alternative source of news.

File photo | Marshall Griffin | St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis Police Chief Sam Dotson has proposed a new way to rank judges on gun crimes, St. Louis Circuit Attorney Jennifer Joyce announced that the off-duty officer who shot and killed VonDerrit Myers, Jr. will not be charged because Myers produced a firearm, and St.

(via Flickr/mike matney)

The city of St. Louis will soon have a civilian oversight board. And, new police cameras in the city aim to reduce crime, but do they infringe on privacy?

Those were just two of the topics before our legal roundtable guests, our monthly show that takes a look at relevant issues pertaining to the law.

James Cridland via Flickr

In the age of social media and shiny new technology, there often are questions about privacy.

“Nobody wants absolute privacy — that would require us to live like hermits and not see anybody,” Washington University law professor Neil Richards told “St. Louis on the Air” host Don Marsh on Thursday. “At the same time, we want to connect with people, but we also want to be able to do so on our own terms.”

The Supreme Court of Missouri
Flickr | david_shane

Questions over subpoenas are making headlines for a variety of reasons in St. Louis.

In January, St. Louis circuit attorney Jennifer Joyce subpoenaed St. Louis Public Radio and other local news outlets for media related to a raucous St. Louis Board of Aldermen committee meeting.

U.S. Supreme Court
supremecourt.gov

The U.S. Supreme Court’s announcement that it will take up same-sex marriage this term has many people searching for clues to how the court’s justices may rule.

The high court will decide whether same-sex couples have a right to marry under the constitution. Specifically, the court will hear cases that ask it to overturn bans in four states. The cases will be argued in April; a decision is expected in June.

'St. Louis on the Air' legal roundtable members discuss law issues on Dec. 15, 2014, at St. Louis Public Radio. From left, Don Marsh, 'St. Louis on the Air' host; William Freivogel, professor at Southern Illinois University–Carbondale's Paul Simon Publ
Rebecca Smith / St. Louis Public Radio

Many people are unhappy with a grand jury’s decision not to indict police Officer Darren Wilson in the death of Michael Brown, and the St. Louis County prosecutor’s handling of the case.

Friday afternoon, Ron Johnson of Missouri State Highway Patrol asks protester to keep the peace in Ferguson over the course of the night.
Durrie Bouscaren / St. Louis Public Radio

In a special, live evening edition of "St. Louis on the Air," we discussed the grand jury's decision regarding the August shooting death of Michael Brown by police Officer Darren Wilson in Ferguson.

Guests

James Cridland via Flickr

Producer's note: Join us for a special live edition of "St. Louis on the Air" at 10 p.m. Monday, following the announcement of the grand jury decision. You can listen live.

As the nation waited for the Darren Wilson grand jury decision announcement on Monday, the legal roundtable reconvened to discuss issues related to Ferguson, same-sex marriage and other legal issues.

Legal Roundtable Previews Supreme Court Session

Oct 6, 2014
U.S. Supreme Court
supremecourt.gov

The U.S. Supreme Court started its new term Monday morning by announcing it would not hear petitions related to bans on gay marriage in Indiana, Oklahoma, Utah, Virginia and Wisconsin. 

Join The Legal Roundtable Audience On Monday

Oct 2, 2014

"St. Louis on the Air" will host local legal leaders Monday for the Legal Roundtable, and you're invited to join us for the live broadcast.

The Legal Roundtable will convene at Washington University's Bryan Cave Moot Courtroom, and will discuss the new session of the U.S. Supreme Court and other legal matters. Audience members will be able to ask questions during the live broadcast.

Guests

James Cridland via Flickr

Legal questions surrounding Michael Brown’s death and events in Ferguson again dominated the conversation among our legal roundtable.

Justice Department Investigations

The Justice Department has three roles in Ferguson, said William Freivogel, director of the school of journalism at Southern Illinois University in Carbondale. First: A criminal investigation, independent of the state’s investigation.

James Cridland via Flickr

The law continues to play a central role in the controversy over Missouri’s execution methods. On Friday, the Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that the state is not required to reveal the name of the pharmacy supplying it with execution drugs.