Cecile McLorin Salvant | St. Louis Public Radio

Cecile McLorin Salvant

Dennis C. Owsley / Copyright Dennis C. Owsley

Jazz Unlimited FOR Sunday, November 26, 2017 will be “The Keys and Strings Hour (Jim Hall) Plus New Music.”  I have always been fascinated by the sound and conception of guitarist Jim Hall, who will be featured on the “Keys and Strings Hour.”  Hall will be heard in duos, a trio, piano quartets and a quintet featuring such artists as Ron Carter, Charlie Haden, Pat Metheny, Hampton Hawes, Geoff Keezer and Red Mitchell, who will be playing cello.  New music will be heard by the Canadian pianist Nick McLean, Bill Charlap, Cecile McLorin Salvant, Joey Alexander, Christian McBride and hi

Jazz singer Cecile McLorin Salvant
Mark Fitton | Courtesy of the artist

When jazz vocalist Cecile McLorin Salvant takes the stage Saturday at the Sheldon Concert Hall in St. Louis, she won't be trying to sing as her storied predecessors might have.

Though the virtuoso performer has been hailed as a successor to such greats as Ella Fitzgerald and Betty Carter, she is very much a contemporary singer. Salvant, a Haitian-American who grew up in Miami, has grown to love jazz standards, show tunes and songs many might miss, like the Kurt Weill/Langston Hughes piece "Somehow I Could Never Believe."

But the 28-year-old also writes original compositions and through her singing wants to make her own statement about the music's past, present and future.

Dennis C. Owsley / Copyright Dennis C. Owsley

Jazz Unlimited for Sunday, April 24, will be “The Keys and Strings Hour + New Music.” The Keys and Strings hour will feature pianist Keith Jarrett, one of the most amazing improvisers in jazz, in solo, duo and trio performances.  New music for April will include the debut live recording of the Thad Jones-Mel Lewis Orchestra, the SF Jazz Collective performing the music of Michael Jackson, vocalist Cecile McLorin Salvant, the Steve Kuhn Trio, the East-West Trumpet Summit, newly discovered live piano duets between Tommy Flanagan and Hank Jones, Ernie Wilkins’ Almost big Band, the Marc