Citizen Science | St. Louis Public Radio

Citizen Science

While part of the St. Louis Box Turtle Project, Georgette survived a serious bacterial infection and an animal attack. She died during the polar vortex at approximately age 15.
Jamie Palmer | St. Louis Zoo Institute of Conservation Medicine

For those who knew her, Georgette was a feisty drifter who lived and died in Forest Park.

She was also somewhat of a local celebrity.

The three-toed box turtle was one of the oldest subjects in the St. Louis Box Turtle Project, a study designed to understand the health and movement of urban turtles. Even among her armored prehistoric kin, Georgette was particularly tenacious. In 2014, she survived a serious bacterial infection, and a few months later, lost her front leg in an animal attack.

Eileen Graessle, right, photographs a honeybee on a milkweed flower at the BeeBlitz in Forest Park on June 16, 2018.
Shahla Farzan | St. Louis Public Radio

Eileen Graessle leaned in close to a patch of milkweed, as she tried to capture a photo of a honeybee in motion.

It was a difficult task, but one that Graessle relished as a volunteer for the BeeBlitz citizen science project on Saturday in Forest Park. The annual event aims to help researchers determine which species are present in the city and how their populations are changing.

“It helps to study the way that they move,” said Graessle, an amateur beekeeper who lives in Ballwin. “I also take multiple shots and then usually some of those come out exciting and defined.”

Don't know how to view the eclipse or what to look for? Never fear! We've assembled a panel to teach you how to become an amateur astronomer.
J Lippold | Flickr

So you’ve never viewed a solar eclipse before? Not surprising, unless you’re a severe umbraphile or were alive 148 years ago. That was the last time a total solar eclipse passed over Missouri on Aug. 7, 1869.

On Monday’s St. Louis on the Air, a week before the total solar eclipse that will pass over the southern parts of the St. Louis region, we discussed how to view the eclipse as an amateur astronomer. What should you be looking for? What kind of experimentation can you do? How can you help your kids experience the eclipse?

SK Films

Citizen science is a growing opportunity for non-professional and amateur scientists to participate in professional research.

There are numerous opportunities for citizen science in the St. Louis area and engaging in such endeavors can contribute to protecting environments and preserving species.