Kameel Stanley | St. Louis Public Radio

Kameel Stanley

Author Jason Reynolds was in conversation with former 'We Live Here' podcast co-host Kameel Stanley on April 26 at University City High School. | Heidi Drexler
Heidi Drexler

Jason Reynolds is a prominent poet and author of middle-grade and young adult novels. He’s a National Book Award finalist and the author of such books including “Ghost,” “Long Way Down,” and “When I Was The Greatest.”

Reynolds recently sat down for an onstage conversation with Kameel Stanley, the former co-host of St. Louis Public Radio’s “We Live Here” podcast.

Six-year-old Rae Reece, at left, tells a story about "the best day ever" during St. Louis Public Radio's We Live Here" house party Nov. 27 as storytelling coach Chiffontae Ross looks on.
David Kovaluk | St. Louis Public Radio

For four seasons now, St. Louis Public Radio’s We Live Here podcast team has been telling community-driven stories for listeners “somewhere on the woke spectrum.” A couple weeks ago, co-producers and hosts Tim Lloyd and Kameel Stanley took that concept one step further and asked a handful of local young people to do the storytelling themselves.

The fresh voices that were in the spotlight at We Live Here’s well-attended house party on Nov. 27 are also the focus of this week’s new episode of the podcast.

On Friday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh previewed some of the highlights with Stanley, who noted that the new episode is part of an effort to get more youth voices on the show.

Rosetta Watson was functionally evicted from the city after her former boyfriend attacked her.
File photo | Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

Earlier this month, domestic violence survivor Rosetta Watson won a settlement in a lawsuit brought against the city of Maplewood, which had revoked Watson’s occupancy permit after she called the police to her home more than two times within six months. She spoke with St. Louis Public Radio’s We Live Here team in recent days and is the focus of this week’s brand-new episode of the podcast.

On Friday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh talked with We Live Here co-host/producer Kameel Stanley, who gave listeners a quick update on Watson’s situation as well as the broader implications of the settlement in Maplewood and beyond.

“She got a chunk of money which she’s using to buy a home of her own that no one can ever kick her out of, so that’s good news,” Stanley said. “But part of her settlement also [involves] changing things a little bit in Maplewood.”

Mow to Own
Maria Altman | St. Louis Public Radio

Vacant properties are abundant in St. Louis. But one local millennial is on a mission to reduce that number.

“Eltorean [Hawkins] is a young twenty-something who grew up in the Walnut Park neighborhood, and he’s just decided to take it upon himself,” Kameel Stanley said on Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air.

Hosted by St. Louis Public Radio’s Kameel Stanley and Tim Lloyd, the July 10 “I Live Here” event featured five St. Louisans’ stories include one from Chiffontae.
Tim Lloyd | St. Louis Public Radio

In an effort to spur more listener engagement, the “We Live Here” team decided early on to host a community storytelling event. Now in its third year, “I Live Here” features the voices of community members related to a specific topic. Five St. Louisans shared their tales at the latest gathering on July 10.

On Thursday’s St. Louis on the Air, “We Live Here” co-host/co-producer Kameel Stanley joined host Don Marsh to talk about the most recent episode of the podcast, which samples a few speakers from the event.

David Kovaluk | St. Louis Public Radio

The ArchCity Defenders, a non-profit law firm focused on civil rights, will soon announce their Excellence in Poverty Journalism Awards to recognize journalists who cover race, class and poverty in depth.

Doris Fiddmont Frazier, center, and other parishioners worship at Union Baptist Church, a fixture in Westland Acres.
File Photo | Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

Those familiar with St. Louis neighborhoods are probably also familiar with the concept of gentrification. The latest episode of the We Live Here podcast, “Paved over Histories”, tackles this issue with its eye on the west St. Louis County community of Westland Acres.

The history of the region’s closed streets comes into sharp focus in the latest episode of St. Louis Public Radio’s “We Live Here” podcast.
Tim Lloyd | St. Louis Public Radio

Featuring everything from wrought-iron gates to concrete balls, restricted streets are a common characteristic in some St. Louis-area neighborhoods. That’s by design – and not just in an architectural sense.

“The first gated street in St. Louis was Benton Place, which is in Lafayette Square,” St. Louis Public Radio’s Tim Lloyd said Thursday in conversation with host Don Marsh on St. Louis on the Air. “It was built just after the Civil War … the wealthy elite in St. Louis were not happy with where they were living, mostly in the urban core at that time.”

The latest "We Live Here" episode features an interview with the author of “Color of Law,” Richard Rothstein.
Stefan Steinbauer | Unsplash

Segregation in housing is a reality in metro areas all over the country, and St. Louis is far from an exception.

On Thursday’s episode of St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh spoke with We Live Here co-host/producer Kameel Stanley about the podcast’s latest episode “The Segregation Myth-buster.” The episode features an interview with the author of “Color of Law,” Richard Rothstein, who breaks down the fact that segregation is not some sort of anomaly, but rather it is imposed very purposefully through means of government institutions and policies.

Good news from our newsroom

May 17, 2018
Debra R. Beckman | Missouri NEA

Awards. Recognition. And a party! 

City officials in Maplewood, Missouri forced Rosetta Watson from her home using a public nuisance ordinance. Watson is suing the city in federal court and her story is featured in the latest episode of We Live Here.
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

We Live Here, the national-award winning podcast about race and class from St. Louis Public Radio and PRX, debuted its fourth season Thursday.  

The show, born out of the emotional turmoil and cultural upheaval of the Ferguson uprising, will break new ground this year.

Hosts Tim Lloyd and Kameel Stanley will spend the entire season exploring the intersection of race, class and housing in St. Louis, one of the nation's most segregated regions.