Rhonda Hamm-Niebruegge | St. Louis Public Radio

Rhonda Hamm-Niebruegge

St. Louis Lambert International Airport. August 2018
File Photo | Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

Updated Nov. 13 to reflect the film is no longer being distributed. 

First Rule Films pulled its documentary “Hard Landing at Lambert” from all streaming platforms Tuesday at the request of the Airport Advisory Working Group. 

Corinne Ruff | St. Louis Public Radio

Updated Oct. 28 with an update from First Rule

A representative from First Rule on Monday noted the media company has postponed a private screening of a new documentary about St. Louis Lambert International Airport. She did not provide a reason for the delayed event or a rescheduled date.

Original story from Oct. 25:

There’s a new documentary about St. Louis Lambert International Airport — and members of the working group considering whether to lease the airport aren’t happy about it.

The company that produced the documentary, First Rule, this week emailed invitations for a private viewing of the film, as well as a presentation about the airport privatization process so far. First Rule is a subsidiary of media advocacy organization Pelopidas, founded by Travis Brown, who also leads Grow Missouri.

Grow Missouri is one of several consultants for FLY314, the group hired by the city of St. Louis to consider whether to privatize the airport.

St. Louis Lambert International Airport. August 2018
File photo | Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

A new plan for civil service employees at St. Louis Lambert International Airport aims to alleviate fears about what will happen to jobs if the city leases the airport to a private operator.

The preliminary program, developed by the St. Louis Airport Advisory Working Group, lays out three options for the 550 city employees at the airport: They could stay on with a five-year job guarantee under the private operator, apply with preference for another city job or stay in their current position during a two-year transition period.

File photo | St. Louis Public Radio
File photo | St. Louis Public Radio

If you've been waiting to walk around the gate areas of St. Louis Lambert International Airport with a beer or cocktail, you need to continue to exercise patience. The process to revise alcohol permits allowing new state regulations to go into effect is not yet complete.

Flight board lambert airport
File photo | Kae Petrin | St. Louis Public Radio

Passengers at St. Louis Lambert International Airport are on the verge of getting more time to surf the internet for free. A plan to increase the cap on daily Wi-Fi access is expected to go into effect next month, pending approval by the St. Louis Board of Aldermen.

The bill making its way through City Hall increases the free daily limit to an hour, instead of the current 20 minutes. The change has been prompted by travelers, who want more time online before they have to start paying.

File photo | St. Louis Public Radio
File photo | St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis Lambert International Airport doesn’t have the crowded terminals of a hub, but things have been looking up.

Last year, nearly 14 million passengers came through the airport, a 10 percent increase over 2016 and the most passengers since 2008.

“We’re pretty pleased with the direction,” said Airport Director Rhonda Hamm-Niebruegge.

The numbers poured in at a recent Airport Commission meeting.

Rhonda Hamm-Niebruegge, thet director of the St. Louis Lambert International Airport discussed privatization, REAL ID, growth at the airport and more on Tuesday's "St. Louis on the Air."
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

During peak air travel season this summer, St. Louis Lambert International Airport will see about 260 flights per day, with about 71 total non-stop flights. This June, Terminal 2’s E Concourse will expand by four more gates to accommodate Southwest Airlines travel. 

On Tuesday’s St. Louis on the Air, St. Louis Lambert International Airport Director Rhonda Hamm-Niebruegge joined host Don Marsh to discuss recent growth at the airport, REAL ID compliance, the recent spate of airline controversy and talks about privatizing the airport. 

About 1 million passengers come through Lambert airport every month. Photo taken in December 2016.
Mary Delach Leonard | St. Louis Public Radio

Visitors to Lambert-St. Louis International Airport can expect to see signs with the airport’s new name sometime in late January. The change will flip the name of airport founder Albert Bond Lambert with the name of the city — to St. Louis Lambert International Airport.

Airport director Rhonda Hamm-Niebruegge said the goal is to emphasize the airport’s geographic location — which will help in marketing and outreach efforts — while continuing to recognize the legacy of Lambert who started the airport nearly 100 years ago.

St. Louis residents will probably notice little change when they go to the airport because fewer signs will be affected than people might expect, she said.

Photo courtesy of Missouri History Museum

Every month, a million passengers come through the St. Louis airport named for Albert Bond Lambert. Most have no clue who Lambert was — and that includes people from St. Louis.

According to a survey conducted for the airport a year ago, only 17 of 600 respondents correctly identified the connection between Lambert and the airport.

Rhonda Hamm-Niebruegge
Provided by St. Louis Lambert International Airport

Lambert Airport could end up with a plan to bring in more money and another to fund capital improvements by the end of the week. Officials are waiting for final approval from the St. Louis Board of Aldermen on an agreement with the airlines that use the airport. The airlines have already approved a five-year, capital improvement plan.

St. Louis Lambert International Airport
Michael R. Allen | Flickr

Now that Lambert-St. Louis International Airport has finished its major physical improvements, it is working to position itself to best advantage in today’s aviation economy.

The airport released a five-year strategic plan Wednesday with broad goals to strengthen its finances and to better meet the needs of its passengers. The plan centers on utilizing every asset the airport has while recognizing its limitations.

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

A Missouri Air National Guard facility that has been vacant since 2009 is getting a new life, thanks to a company that's hoping to capitalize on the growing demand for general aviation traffic at Lambert-St. Louis International Airport.

Charter flight provider JetLinx announced today that it will spend about $1 million to convert one of the buildings into a terminal for its clients. It will be the only general aviation company at Lambert with its own fleet of planes, which is expected to start operating in September.

via Solar Impulse

St. Louis will be a pit stop for the first solar-powered flight across America. It was announced Tuesday that Lambert Airport is one of five airports selected for Solar Impulse's cross-country flight.

"We are the city forever linked to Charles Lindbergh nearly 90 years ago," St. Louis mayor Francis Slay said. "This year we recognize that there are new milestones and advances to witness, and St. Louis will be part of that inspiring story."

St. Louis Lambert International Airport
Michael R. Allen | Flickr

A proposal that would have boosted parking rates at Lambert Airport just before the start of the busy holiday travel seasons is on hold for now.

Commissioners were expected to vote today on a proposal that would boost the rates for parking at the garages for Terminals 1 and 2, as well as three of the airport's four surface lots, plus made a series of changes to the rates charged to ground transportation like taxis, hotel shuttles, and charter buses. The parking rates would have gone up Nov. 1, though the ground transportation rates would have changed in January.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, March 27, 2012 - By the end of this week, leaders of the stymied effort to transform Lambert St. Louis International Airport into an international cargo hub hope to have their mission back on track.

A panel headed by Dan Mehan, chief executive of the Missouri Chamber of Commerce and Industry, is expected on Friday to present a report detailing how to reorganize the longstanding Midwest China Hub Commission and kick-start the campaign to woo the Chinese and other international shippers to use Lambert as a trade gateway.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Jan. 11, 2012 - Rhonda Hamm-Niebruegge, director of Lambert-St. Louis International Airport has been honored by the Professional Convention Management Association, receiving its 2011 Chairman's Award.

According to the airport's announcement, "The honor was given in recognition of her leadership and crisis management following the April 22, 2011 tornado that hit Lambert-St. Louis International Airport."

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, April 25, 2011 - Jeff Lea, public relations manager at Lambert-St. Louis International Airport, said Sunday morning that the airport is now open for arrivals and departures. "The first flights took off from Lambert early Easter morning, less than 36 hours after a tornado caused extensive damage to the airport complex," he added.

While Lea expects that the airport will have 60 percent of its flights operational Sunday, he urges travelers to contact their airline for the latest flight information. On Monday, Lambert officials expect Terminal 1 to be 80 percent operational and Terminal 2 to be 100 percent operational.

(via Flickr/dbking)

After easily passing the House last week, a Missouri Senate committee is now considering a bill designed to make Lambert Airport an international air cargo hub.

The so-called Aerotropolis bill would provide around $480 million in tax credits to companies that develop air cargo facilities at or near Lambert.  Airport Director Rhonda Hamm-Niebruegge told the committee that the bill is about more than just doing business with China.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, March 15, 2010 - As the new director of Lambert Airport, Rhonda Hamm-Niebruegge is the public face of a historic airport making its way through the turbulent winds of change, and she understands that part of her job is explaining that journey to local residents.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Feb. 18, 2010 - Lambert St. Louis Airport is shutting down two smaller concourses and revamping the remaining A and C concourses, as part of what St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay has billed "the most extensive renovation of its terminal ever."

"These projects will breathe new life into the facility while preserving its history," said Airport Director Rhonda Hamm-Niebruegge in her announcement Thursday afternoon offering details of the two-year, $50 million renovation that is part of Lambert's "Airport Experience Program."

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Feb. 8, 2010 - Lambert St. Louis Airport director Rhonda Hamm-Niebruegge says there's little chance that the airport will continue operating three firehouses after the next fiscal year begins July 1.

The oldest one, situated just west of the terminal and at the south end of the airport, has been selected for probable closure. The estimated cost savings is $1.8 million a year, according to an audit issued in November by Missouri state Auditor Susan Montee.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Oct. 27, 2009 - Rhonda Hamm-Niebruegge, an airline executive with more than 25 years of experience, says she has "a passion for Lambert."

That's among the key reasons St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay announced Tuesday that Hamm-Niebruegge will become the new director of Lambert St. Louis Airport, as of Jan. 3.