Richmond Heights | St. Louis Public Radio

Richmond Heights

Marissanne Lewis-Thompson | St. Louis Public Radio

Richmond Heights officials and residents will come together on Sunday to dedicate a plaque to a historic black neighborhood in the city, which has nearly disappeared.

At one time, the Hadley Township neighborhood was among just a few places African Americans could live within St. Louis County. It was founded in the early 1900s by the Evens and Howard Fire Brick Company as a way to attract and keep employees. 

Segregation in the city and county limited where African Americans could live. The lack of public transportation made it even harder to fill the positions. In an effort to solve the problem, Evens and Howard met with county officials to build homes for black families in Brentwood and Richmond Heights.

Ashe-Hudlin Park is located next to the former home of Richard Hudlin where Arthur Ashe also lived and practiced.
The City of Richmond Heights

International tennis player Arthur Ashe and his coach Richard Hudlin, who both broke racial barriers in the sport, are getting their own park right next to the place that started it all.

The city of Richmond Heights and the Richmond Heights Historical Society dedicated the Ashe-Hudlin Park on Sunday. The small park is located at the intersection of Bennett Avenue and Laclede Station Road, next to Hudlin’s former home at 1221 Laclede Station Road where Ashe also lived and practiced.

Morning headlines: March 22, 2012

Mar 22, 2012
(New Orleans Saints Press Kit)

Gregg Williams apologizes

Rams defensive coordinator Gregg Williams is apologizing to the NFL, to St. Louis coach Jeff Fisher, the Rams organization and football fans in general for running a bounty pool while he was in New Orleans.

Williams was suspended indefinitely on Wednesday by the NFL, and the Rams say he'll be eligible for reinstatement after the season.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, March 19, 2012 - Richmond Heights becomes the fourth city in St. Louis County, and the fifth in the region, to approve an ordinance that expands nondiscrimination protections in employment, housing and public accommodations to lesbians, gays, bisexuals and transgendered individuals.