St. Louis Cardinals | St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis Cardinals

Busch Stadium, home of the St. Louis Cardinals, is located in the heart of downtown.
David Kovaluk | St. Louis Public Radio

The St. Louis Cardinals will open training camp this week at Busch Stadium. They are preparing for a shortened regular season because of the pandemic. Major League Baseball is planning for all teams to play 60 games, starting July 23 or 24.

St. Louis Public Radio’s Wayne Pratt spoke with MLB.com Cardinals beat writer Anne Rogers about the shortened season, what this might look like for the fans and how she’s planning to do her job during a pandemic. 

The Mathews-Dickey Boys' & Girls' Club was founded by two baseball coaches and has worked to keep baseball alive in north St. Louis city.
Mathews-Dickey Boys' & Girls' Club

In 2016, Ed Wheatley retired from his job as an engineer at AT&T. But Wheatley has kept busy — to the point that Reedy Press recently published his third book in as many years. Wheatley’s “Baseball in St. Louis: From Little Leagues to Major Leagues” surveys the city’s rich baseball history, from the Major Leaguers who got their start here to the semi-pro and amateur leagues that flourished for decades.

In the book, Wheatley posits that the classic St. Louis question asking where someone went to high school works just as well when framed around the national pastime and asking where you played baseball. 

“It’s just kind of gauging the enemy, if you will,” he explained on St. Louis on the Air. “‘You played baseball. How good are you? What club were you with? Who did you play with?’ It’s all those same kinds of identifying answers as people ascertain when you ask, ‘Where did you go to high school?' It tells a lot about you.” 

February 18, 2020 Ed Wheatley
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

Jackie Robinson famously integrated Major League Baseball, taking the field for the National League’s Brooklyn Dodgers in April 1947. And the American League followed a few months later, when the Cleveland Indians put Larry Doby into the lineup.

But right behind Cleveland were the St. Louis Browns. Just 12 days later, the team played its first black player. And two days after that, the Browns became the first club to put two black players into a game when Willard Brown and Hank Thompson took the field. That milestone was all the more remarkable in light of this fact: It would take the St. Louis Cardinals another seven years to integrate. 

On Tuesday’s St. Louis on the Air, author Ed Wheatley explained what led the Browns to break the city’s Major League Baseball color barrier. 

Ella Olsson | www.freshnlean.com/recipes

In the new Netflix documentary "The Game Changers," a former team physician for the St. Louis Rams and Cardinals challenges what he refers to as a “locker-room mythology about meat, protein and strength.

“The attitude of most athletes for many years was that you had to eat meat to get protein, [that] we need that protein to get big and strong, and again, that meat was the best source. But that’s clearly just not true,” Dr. James Loomis said Friday on St. Louis on the Air.

“There are many, many highly successful athletes, both in the strength world … but also endurance athletes, who really thrive on a plant-based diet.”

Cardinals Shildt Voted National League’s Manager Of The Year

Nov 13, 2019
St. Louis Cardinals manager Mike Shildt (third from left) and front office officials answers questions on August 28, 2018 after giving Shildt a two-year contract as manager.
File photo | 5 On Your Side

St. Louis Cardinals manager Mike Shildt was named recipient of the 2019 National League Manager of the Year Award as voted on by the Baseball Writers Association of America.

Shildt, who this season guided the Cardinals to their first National League Central title since 2015, joins Hall of Fame managers Whitey Herzog (1985) and Tony La Russa (2002) as Cardinals past winners of the award.

Cardinals team president Bill DeWitt III and other Ballpark Village representatives officially open PwC Pennant Building in downtown St. Louis. 11/06/19
Andrea Smith | St. Louis Public Radio

The St. Louis Cardinals and the Cordish Cos. opened the PwC Pennant Building on Wednesday, the first completed project in the $260 million second phase of Ballpark Village. 

Cardinals President Bill DeWitt III said finishing the office building is an exciting step forward.

“I’ve just been one of those kids like on Christmas morning recently. I just get excited to come down here and look at the progress every day,” DeWitt said. 

The Ebbets Field neighborhood in Edwardsville is named after the original home of Major League Baseball's Dodgers.
David Kovaluk | St. Louis Public Radio

Imagine living in the heart of Cardinals country and not only being a fan of another legendary Major League Baseball team, but also an owner.

Meet Robert L. Plummer. 

CEO of Downtown St. Louis Inc. Missy Kelley joined Friday's talk show to discuss new developments in the city.
Lara Hamdan| St. Louis Public Radio

With Wednesday night’s win, the St. Louis Cardinals advanced to the National League Championship Series for the first time since 2014. 

On Friday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Sarah Fenske talked with Missy Kelley, the CEO of Downtown St. Louis Inc., about the economic boost the Cardinals’ success is providing to the St. Louis area. They also talked about Ballpark Village’s new high-end housing options, and Kelley shared her top picks for businesses that have opened downtown in recent years.

Helene Britton in the baseball stands with her children, Marie and Frank DeHaas Britton. She sold the St. Louis Cardinals in 1918, before being able to pass the team to her son.
Missouri Historical Society Collections

The majority women ownership group at the helm of St. Louis' new professional soccer team is continuing a line of female sports ownership in the region that extends to the early 1900s.

While many St. Louisans recall that the National Football League's Rams were owned by Georgia Frontiere for much of the team's time in the Midwest, they might not know the Cardinals also had a female owner.

And she just so happened to be the first female owner in Major League Baseball history.

The St. Louis Cardinals clinched the National League Central Division on Sunday and will face the Braves in Atlanta on Thursday in their first postseason game in four years.
5 On Your Side

Updated at 6:45 p.m., Sept. 29 with comments from the team

The St. Louis Cardinals are division champions for the first time since 2015. 

The team walloped the Chicago Cubs 9-0 in front of a hometown crowd at Busch Stadium on Sunday, clinching their spot atop the National League Central Division. Milwaukee’s consecutive losses to the Colorado Rockies on Saturday and Sunday kept the Brewers two games behind St. Louis in the race for the title.

The Cardinals will open the playoffs Thursday in Atlanta against the Braves.

Busch Stadium, home of the St. Louis Cardinals, is located in the heart of downtown.
Joe Penniston | Flickr

Attending a baseball game at Busch Stadium in the middle of downtown St. Louis is quite a different experience from going to a game at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles, where the stadium is surrounded by parking lots.

In her new book, historian Connie Sexauer argues that a stadium in the midst of the city brings people of different socioeconomic backgrounds together, and it shapes the culture of the businesses and neighborhoods that reside nearby.

Rob Rains at Busch Stadium.
Rob Rains

The St. Louis Cardinals are now halfway through their season. So far, they’ve left speculators less than impressed – but they still have the chance to improve. 

On Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air, St. Louis Public Radio’s executive editor Shula Neuman talked about the ongoing season and what’s ahead for the team as they go on break for the All-Star game. Joining the discussion was longtime sportswriter Rob Rains of STLSportsPage.com.

Ralph Toenjes carries game-used baseballs during an Aug. 16 game from the Cardinals' dugout to the Authentics Shop in the right field concourse of Busch Stadium.
David Kovaluk | St. Louis Public Radio

Editor's note: This story was originally published Aug. 22, 2018.

What happens to all those used baseballs the umpires toss out of games at Busch Stadium?

After Keith Duncan of St. Louis submitted that question to our Curious Louis feature, we went to the Aug. 16 game between the Cardinals and Washington Nationals to find out.

That’s where we found Ralph Toenjes hard at work, happily greeting fans at the Authentics Shop, located behind center field. Toenjes sells memorabilia, including used baseballs, fresh from the field. During games, it’s his job to fetch baseballs from the Cardinals dugout every two or three innings.

The grounds crew works on the field at Busch Stadium on March 27, 2019.
Mary Delach Leonard | St. Louis Public Radio

At long last, spring finally arrives for Cardinals fans at 2:30 p.m. Friday when the Budweiser Clydesdales take their annual strut around the warning track at Busch Stadium — a day later than planned.

A rainy forecast for Thursday prompted the Cardinals to postpone their home opener against the San Diego Padres to Friday afternoon. The team promises all the traditional hoopla of opening day, including the Clydesdales and motorcades introducing the 2019 Redbirds and Cardinals Hall of Famers.

The grounds crew prepares the field at Busch Stadium for the Cardinals home opener in 2017. Photo was taken on March 29, 2017.
Mary Delach Leonard | St. Louis Public Radio

No day looms quite as large on the St. Louis sports calendar as the Cardinals’ home opener. Even though other cities put on a show for the start of baseball season, St. Louis stands out from the crowd – at least according to Derrick Goold, a sportswriter for the St. Louis Post-Dispatch.

“Opening day is a special time of year for a lot of teams mainly because they get a packed house, they're coming back from spring training – but the Cardinals add to it the Clydesdales and the parade of cars and the Hall of Famers,” Goold told St. Louis Public Radio reporter Rachel Lippmann on Thursday’s St. Louis on the Air.

The grounds crew works on the field at Busch Stadium last week. Construction was still under way on the Budweiser Terrace, a new social gathering area in the upper right field seating sections. It will feature lounge seating, standing areas and two bars.
File photo | Mary Delach Leonard | St. Louis Public Radio

The St. Louis Cardinals have moved their home opener at Busch Stadium from Thursday afternoon to Friday because of a rainy forecast, the team announced.

But don’t worry, Cardinals fans, the traditional Opening Day show will go on — just a day late.

Construction of the second phase of the Ballpark Village development, across from Busch Stadium on March 28, 2019.
File photo | Mary Delach Leonard | St. Louis Public Radio

When Cardinals fans go to Busch Stadium this season, they’ll have a good view of a major construction project under way at Ballpark Village. A 29-story luxury residential tower, 10-story office building and 216-room hotel are rising into the St. Louis skyline, just across the street from the stadium.

The $260 million expansion of the Ballpark Village development is on time and on budget, said Nick Benjamin, vice president of The Cordish Companies, which is developing the site with the St. Louis Cardinals.

St. Louis Cardinals first baseman Mark McGwire lifts his 10-year-old son, Matt, after hitting his 62nd home run of the 1998 season on Sept. 8, 1998, breaking Roger Maris' record.
Bill Greenblatt | UPI

On Sept. 8, 1998, St. Louis Cardinals slugger Mark McGwire sent a low line drive over Busch Stadium’s left field wall to break Roger Maris’ 37-year-old home run record.

McGwire’s 62nd home run of the season sent the sellout crowd and the city into a frenzy. But for some fans, McGwire’s eventual admission that he used steroids has taken the shine off the record-breaking summer.

St. Louis Cardinals manager Mike Shildt (third from left) and front office officials answers questions on August 28, 2018 after giving Shildt a two-year contract as manager.
File photo | 5 On Your Side

The St. Louis Cardinals like what they’ve seen from Mike Shildt, and they want him to stick around and keep it going.

The team announced Tuesday they had removed the interim tag from Shildt, and signed him to a two-year deal as manager of the club. The terms were not disclosed.

Former St. Louis Cardinals manager Mike Matheny speaks after being introduced as the team's 49th manager on November 14, 2011. The Cardinals fired Matheny on July 14, 2018 after six and a half seasons.
File photo | Bill Greenblatt | UPI

Updated July 15 at 1 p.m. with comments from Cardinals officials and interim manager Mike Shildt — Mike Matheny, a former Gold Glove catcher for the St. Louis Cardinals who would go on to become the team’s manager in 2011, was fired Saturday night after a loss to the Cincinnati Reds.

Cardinals President of Baseball Operations John Mozeliak said at a press conference Sunday that the decision to remove Matheny was made Friday. Team officials fired Matheny the following evening. The Cardinals also fired hitting coaches John Mabry and Bill Mueller.

Ed Wheatley joined Don Marsh for a discussion about his illustrated children’s book “Incredible Cardinals.”
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

For St. Louis Cardinals fans of a certain age, the players painted on the left field wall of Busch Stadium evoke fond memories of baseball heroes of days gone by. But for younger fans, the names Bob Gibson, Red Schoendienst and even Stan Musial may not even register, much less Dizzy Dean.

To rectify that matter, local author Ed Wheatley and illustrator Ed Koehler have created a book for children featuring St. Louis Cardinals greats who are now in the Baseball Hall of Fame as well as some who may be future inductees.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Oct. 14, 2011 - The best fans in baseball did their part at Busch Stadium Thursday night: They cheered themselves hoarse, fervently waved their rally towels and turned their baseball caps inside-out to coax a do-or-die rally in the bottom of the ninth with the Cardinals trailing the Brewers 4-2.

The casket of St. Louis Cardinals great 'Red' Schoendienst is escorted from the Cathedral Basilica in the Central West End on June 5, 2018. Schoendienst died June 6, 2018 at the age of 95.
Robert Cohen | Pool photo

One of the most beloved members of the St. Louis Cardinals' organization was rememberd Friday as a humble man who loved baseball and his family. Albert "Red" Schoendienst has been laid to rest. The baseball Hall of Famer died June 6. He was 95.

Red Schoendienst, Cardinal great, dies at 95.
Ron Lewis

Baseball Hall of Famer and former Cardinal player and manager Red Schoendienst, who overcame a severe eye injury and tuberculosis to play major-league baseball for 19 years and managed the St. Louis Cardinals to two National League pennants and a world championship, died Wednesday. He was 95.

Albert Fred Schoendienst, born Feb. 2, 1923, was the most famous native of Germantown, Illinois, a village of less than a square mile in southern Illinois. With his curly red hair and freckles, Mr. Schoendienst was soon known only as “Red."

Benjamin Hochman describes his book, “The Big 50: St. Louis Cardinals,” as “an homage … to everyone and everything that makes St. Louis a rich and rarified baseball community.” May 8, 2018
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

There’s no sports town quite like St. Louis, if you ask native Benjamin Hochman, and that’s what makes his new volume about the St. Louis Cardinals almost more love letter than book.

“My first lullaby was Jack Buck’s voice, if you will, and I’ve always just appreciated the connection between the team and the people here,” the St. Louis Post-Dispatch sports columnist said on Tuesday’s St. Louis on the Air. “I’ve lived in other sports cities, and there’s nothing like St. Louis and baseball.”

Ballpark Village
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

Baseball fans can expect increased security at Busch Stadium and Ballpark Village this week during the Cardinals’ home stand against Chicago's White Sox and Cubs after a fatal shooting on Sunday at the Budweiser Brew House.

Additional security may ease the fears of some fans according to Patrick Rishe, director of the Sports Business Program at Washington University, but he said it certainly doesn’t send the right message about St. Louis.

The grounds crew works on the field at Busch Stadium last week. Construction was still under way on the Budweiser Terrace, a new social gathering area in the upper right field seating sections. It will feature lounge seating, standing areas and two bars.
File photo | Mary Delach Leonard | St. Louis Public Radio

After a cold and wet start to the season, Major League Baseball finally sloshes into the Gateway City at 5:30 p.m. Thursday, when the Clydesdales take their first strut of the season around the warning track at Busch Stadium.

The St. Louis Cardinals are promising all of the traditional trimmings for their home-opening ceremonies: Motorcades will deliver the Hall of Famers and the 2018 team to home plate. There will be a color guard, a giant American flag at center field, and — weather permitting — a flyover by a KC-135 Stratotanker, an Air Force refueling aircraft.

Busch Stadium in 2014.
OAKLEYORIGINALS | FLICKR | HTTP://BIT.LY/1QD8RZX

This week brought the start of the Major League Baseball season and the first defeat for the St. Louis Cardinals, who lost a 9-4 opener to the New York Mets. But the Redbirds have 161 games yet to go this year, and longtime sports writer Rob Rains says the team is looking stronger than it was a year ago.

“I like the young pitchers,” he told St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh on Friday. “I really think they’re probably still a year away from being a really good team because of the youth of the pitchers.”

Officials and dignitaries used ceremonial shovels to symbolically break ground on the second phase of Ballpark Village on Dec. 14, 2016.
Holly Edgell | St. Louis Public Radio

The second phase of Ballpark Village got underway Thursday, and, at the heart of it all, will be a luxury apartment building. The St. Louis Cardinals and development partner, the Cordish Companies, are betting that people will pay top dollar to live at One Cardinal Way, at the corner of Clark Avenue and South Broadway.

A nearby office tower will be the first Class A office building constructed in downtown St. Louis since Metropolitan Square opened in 1989. At the groundbreaking ceremony Thursday, Cardinals President Bill DeWitt III announced that PriceWaterhouseCoopers will be the lead tenant. 

Busch Stadium in Downtown St. Louis.
File photo | Jason Rosenbaum I St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis police are investigating how a fan at Tuesday’s St. Louis Cardinals game at Busch Stadium was hit by a stray bullet. Experts say it’s not as far-fetched a scenario as you might expect.

Police said it was the first time such an incident had happened at the stadium, which opened in 2006. The 34-year-old woman was not seriously injured.

Pages