St. Louis Mayor 2013 | St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis Mayor 2013

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Feb. 26, 2013 - While the mayoral race gets most of the attention, city voters will also go to the polls next month to elect 15 of the city’s 28 aldermen.

For at least eight incumbents, victory is assured. That’s because many who signed up for another term on the board have no opposition in the crucial Democratic primary -- or in the April general election.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, April 27, 2013 - By his staff’s calculation, St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay officially made history on Saturday by becoming the city’s longest-serving mayor.

Although Slay just began his history-setting fourth term on April 16, it wasn’t until Saturday that he hit his 4,394th day in office.  That edges out the three-term tenure of Mayor Henry Kiel, who served 4,393 days during his 12-tenure (April 12, 1913 to April 21, 1925.)

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, March 28, 2013 - On Tuesday, voters throughout the region will go to the polls to select who among them will sit on school boards, govern fire districts and run city governments.

The latter category includes members of city councils, boards of aldermen – and mayors.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, March 27, 2013 - Although Proposition P – or the “Arch tax” – is the best-known issue on Tuesday’s ballot, it’s really part of a crowd.

Dozens of contests are on St. Louis County ballots, including school board and fire district elections, proposed bond issues, and battles for city council and aldermanic seats – and mayor.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Although Proposition P – or the “Arch tax” – is the best-known issue on Tuesday’s ballot, it’s really part of a crowd.

Dozens of contests are on St. Louis County ballots, including school board and fire district elections, proposed bond issues, and battles for city council and aldermanic seats – and mayor.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, March 12, 2013 - As St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay heads into the final lap of his historic bid for a fourth four-year term, expect to hear a lot more about “sustainability,” his top campaign issue for the general election

But “sustainability’’ – in a different sense – is also an apt word to describe the questions at City Hall, as the mayor, his allies and his political opponents recalibrate their relationships in the wake of his Democratic primary victory last week over Board of Aldermen President Lewis Reed.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Post-election analysis frequently addresses concepts that have been used in the past. Change is sometimes given short shrift. Before looking at the returns from the mayor’s race, a few points should be made about the campaign.

Certainly incumbent Francis Slay had a great deal more money than his challenger. That allowed him to put several warm and fuzzy ads on television and send out a number of mailers, some not so fuzzy. Yet, if money were always the determinant in a St. Louis race, Tom Villa would have been elected mayor in 1993.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, March 11, 2013 - Post-election analysis frequently addresses concepts that have been used in the past. Change is sometimes given short shrift. Before looking at the returns from the mayor’s race, a few points should be made about the campaign.

Certainly incumbent Francis Slay had a great deal more money than his challenger. That allowed him to put several warm and fuzzy ads on television and send out a number of mailers, some not so fuzzy. Yet, if money were always the determinant in a St. Louis race, Tom Villa would have been elected mayor in 1993.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, March 7, 2013 - Sharon Tyus didn’t know until Wednesday morning whether she would be going back to the St. Louis Board of Aldermen. That’s because Tyus went to sleep before she knew the results in Tuesday’s Democratic primary, which she described as one of her “little quirks” she’s picked up during her political career.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, March 6, 2013 - With his victory over St. Louis Board of Aldermen President Lewis Reed and former Alderman Jimmie Matthews, St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay is likely to make history by becoming the first chief executive to win four four-year terms.

While other three-term mayors tried and failed to reach that milestone, Slay managed to achieve it with a 10-point victory in Tuesday's  Democratic primary. He is heavily favored against Green Party nominee James McNeely in Aprils general election.

Slay Poised To Make History

Mar 6, 2013
Mayor Slay.
Bill Greenblatt / UPI

Francis Slay is now poised to win a fourth term as mayor of St. Louis.

Slay walked away with the Democratic primary on Tuesday, beating Board of Alderman President Lewis Reed and former Alderman Jimmie Matthews.   Slay received 54 percent of the vote, Reed 44 percent and Matthews a little over one percent.

Live Coverage: St. Louis Picks Presumptive Next Mayor

Mar 5, 2013
voxefxtm | Flickr

Note: This live event has ended. Read the results of the race here.

St. Louis is a solidly Democratic city. So, when voters go to the polls today to vote in its Democratic Mayoral Primary - they are really picking the city's presumptive next mayor.

Will it be incumbent mayor Francis Slay? It would be for an unprecedented fourth term. Or Lewis Reed - the president of the Board of Aldermen? Or Jimmie Matthews - a candidate some have said is a "stalking horse?"

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, March 5, 2013 - St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay took an early lead Tuesday over his chief Democratic rival, Aldermanic President Lewis Reed, with the mayor garnering 55.6 percent of the vote in early returns, including absentee ballots.

Of the 40 percent of the citywide vote counted so far,  Slay received 11,628 votes compared to 8,962 for Reed and 323 for former Alderman Jimmie Matthews.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, March 5, 2013 - St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay appears to be on his way to becoming the city’s longest-serving chief executive, after winning Tuesday’s Democratic primary over his chief rival, Board of Aldermen President Lewis Reed.

With all of the ballots counted, Slay led with 54.4 percent of the vote to Reed's 44.3 percent. But the margin was only about 4,500 votes; Slay collected 23,968 votes to Reed's 19,494 votes.  Former Alderman Jimmie Matthews finished a distant third, with only 575 votes.

St. Louis Voters To Choose Between Matthews, Reed Or Slay In Today's Mayoral Primary

Mar 5, 2013
(Sean Sandefur/St. Louis Public Radio)

St. Louis voters go to the polls today to decide whether incumbent Mayor Francis Slay deserves a fourth term.

Today's municipal primary was expected to decide who will be mayor. No Republicans were running, and the Democratic nominee will be heavily favored over Green Party candidate James Eldon McNeely.

Candidate Profiles

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, March 4, 2013 - By Wednesday morning, St. Louis residents will have a pretty good idea of who the city's new mayor will be.

That’s because on Tuesday, city residents will vote in the Democratic primary for St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay, St. Louis Aldermanic President President Lewis Reed or former Alderman Jimmie Matthews.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, March 4, 2013 - With polls opening in less than 24 hours, St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay and his chief rival – Aldermanic President Lewis Reed – are primarily focusing on one thing: getting their allied voters to show up.

“We’re preparing for ‘game day,’ “ said Reed campaign manager Glenn Burleigh.

Reed Hopes For An Upset In Mayoral Primary

Mar 4, 2013
(Sean Sandefur/St. Louis Public Radio)

St. Louis Aldermanic President Lewis Reed has had numerous challenges in his quest to upset Mayor Francis Slay in the Democratic Primary: a fundraising mismatch, switching campaign managers in the middle of the race, and a third candidate that has tried to steal his thunder, to name a few.

But in spite of this, many believe Reed is Slay’s most formidable challenger in years.

Slay Seeking Unprecedented Fourth Four-Year Term

Mar 4, 2013
(Sean Sandefur/St. Louis Public Radio)

If incumbent mayor Francis Slay wins the Democratic primary tomorrow and then goes on to win re-election in April, he will become the longest serving mayor in St. Louis history.

Serving over 12 years in the office, Slay believes there are many reasons he deserves an unprecedented fourth four-year term.

(Sean Sandefur/St. Louis Public Radio)

On Tuesday, St. Louis voters will go to the polls to select their nominee for mayor. But in the Democratic mayoral primary, former Alderman Jimmie Matthews sometimes seems the odd man out. Unlike his two opponents -- incumbent Mayor Francis Slay and Board of Alderman President Lewis Reed -- he hasn't solicited any campaign donations, and he hasn't spent much money on the race either. That's led some to speculate that he isn't a serious candidate, that he's only in the race to take votes from Reed.

But from Matthews' perspective, there's no difference between Slay and Reed.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Feb. 26, 2013 - With a week left to go, St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay still has $530,000 left to spend in his bid for an unprecedented fourth four-year term.

His chief Democratic rival in the March 5 primary -- Board of Aldermen President Lewis Reed – has less than one-fifth as much.

(via City of St. Louis websites)

Chart updated at 2:24 to reflect most recent 24 and 48 hour campaign filings.

A week out from the Democratic mayoral primary, incumbent Mayor Francis Slay is maintaining his large financial advantage over challenger and Board of Alderman President Lewis Reed.

According to campaign finance reports filed Monday evening, in a month long span from Jan. 20 to Feb. 21, Slay spent $479,291. During that same amount of time, Reed spent only a fraction of that at $88,470.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Feb. 25, 2013 - When ground was broken at last for Ballpark Village earlier this month, the list of long-delayed big projects for St. Louis shrank by one. But it still has some perennial entries on it.

Two of the biggest projects stuck in neutral are Paul McKee’s vision for 1,500 acres in north St. Louis and the so-called China Hub project to attract more international cargo flights to Lambert Airport, with the corresponding higher foreign business profile for the metropolitan area.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Feb. 20, 2013 - Crime has been such a longstanding issue in St. Louis that the city even rates its own “Crime in St. Louis” page on Wikipedia.

St. Louis’ regular ranking as among the nation’s most crime-ridden cities has been a troubling fact for decades.  And it’s among the reasons the issue regularly emerges as a key topic of debate in the city's quadrennial contest for mayor.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Feb. 20, 2013 - If onlookers went to the Trailnet candidate forum looking for another chapter in St. Louis' tempestuous mayor's race, they were likely disappointed.

But if they ventured to the Contemporary Art Museum to hear a mayoral candidate sing “Amazing Grace” and “This Little Light of Mine,” they got exactly what they wanted.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Feb. 19, 2013 - Less than a week before his next campaign report is due, St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay already has outpaced every other politician in the state this month by raising more than $106,000 in large donations in less than three weeks.

Slay even outraised Gov. Jay Nixon, a Democrat known for his frenzied fundraising throughout 2012. (Nixon's large-donor tally so far for February is just over $41,000.)

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Feb. 18, 2013 - St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay’s staff has withdrawn and is revising a document that all new employees have to sign, in the wake of controversy touched off by the mayor’s chief rival for re-election, Board of Aldermen President Lewis Reed.

Slay ordered the change after meeting early Monday with union leaders representing the Greater St. Louis Labor Council and the St. Louis Building and Construction Trades Council. Both groups back the mayor in his re-election bid.

Chris McDaniel, St. Louis Public Radio

Updated 10:03 with the Kwame Building Group's response.

In a late afternoon press conference Thursday, Board of Alderman President and mayoral candidate Lewis Reed accused incumbent Mayor Francis Slay of engaging in a "pay-to-play" system where businesses seeking construction contracts have to first make a donation to the mayor's campaign. The mayor's staff insisted that there are too many safeguards for this to even be possible.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Feb. 13, 2013 - Whoever is selected as mayor this spring will face a significant body of challenges. These challenges are not unique to St. Louis but affect those metropolises that no longer serve as headquarters, financial or industrial centers.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Feb. 12, 2013 - In 1876, in an election that still prompts allegations of vote fraud, residents in the city of St. Louis voted to break away from St. Louis County. The move was prompted by cost-cutting and fears of urban meddling in Jefferson City.

Since then, various efforts – all unsuccessful – have been attempted by city and regional officials to repair what’s become known as the Great Divorce. The biggest hurdle likely rests in St. Louis County, where voters – whose predecessors had opposed the split -- have since resisted a political remarriage.

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