Steven Tilley | St. Louis Public Radio

Steven Tilley

Members of the senate walk onto the floor of the House chambers ahead of this year's State of the State address.
File photo | Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

Updated at 3 p.m. on Thursday to detail Senate action on nonbinding merger resolution.

In a Capitol building often defined by division, state Rep. Peter Merideth believes Better Together’s city-county merger proposal is unifying the disparate St. Louis delegation.

But the St. Louis Democrat said it’s not the kind of unity that proponents probably wanted or expected.

“One thing that we’ve seen in this building is a remarkable amount of regional and bipartisan unity in the idea that this is the wrong way to go about a merger in St. Louis,” Merideth said. “I think the thing that we all agree on is that it should not be happening with a statewide vote that doesn’t allow any real, true local control over our own fate.”

Richardson hugs his father, Mark Richardson, right after he was elected as speaker of the  Missouri House.
Jason Rosenbaum I St. Louis Public Radio | File photo

House Speaker Todd Richardson’s legislative career is full of defied expectations.

Before he was elected to House leadership, Richardson helped bring substantial changes to Missouri’s embattled Second Injury Fund – an issue that bedeviled lawmakers for years. And after the misdeeds of his predecessor, the Poplar Bluff Republican rose to the speakership much earlier than anybody expected.

Steve Tilley and Jamilah Nasheed
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

On this week's edition of the Politically Speaking podcast, St. Louis Public Radio's Jason Rosenbaum and Jo Mannies are pleased to host a special edition* of the show with former Missouri House Speaker Steve Tilley and Missouri State Sen. Jamilah Nasheed.

(*From a technical standpoint, all Politically Speaking podcasts are recorded live and then disseminated throughout the Internet. But this week's show was recorded in front of an audience in St. Louis Public Radio's community room at Grand Center.)

The Missouri General Assembly placed most of this year's amendments on the ballot.
Jason Rosenbaum, St. Louis Public Radio

If there was one big lesson that John Lamping learned during his tenure in the Missouri Senate, it was that it’s very difficult to pass a bill – but very simple to kill one. 

Case in point: The former GOP lawmaker proposed two-year ban on lawmakers going into lobbying, something that’s taken hold in other states and throughout the U.S. Congress. But Lamping’s proposal never got off the ground.

Former House Speaker Steve Tilley
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

On this week’s extra edition of Politically Speaking, St. Louis Public Radio’s Jason Rosenbaum and Jo Mannies welcome back former Missouri House Speaker Steve Tilley to the show.

The Perryville Republican – who now has a residence in Chesterfield – was previously on the show in 2013, and provided candid insights into his tenure as speaker.  We asked him back to discuss two big stories percolating throughout the Missouri political universe – the resignation of Republican House Speaker John Diehl and the fight over “right to work.” 

File photo | Marshall Griffin | St. Louis Public Radio

(Updated 1 p.m., Wed., Feb. 11)

By a voice vote, the Missouri House gave first round-approval Wednesday to a bill to bar construction unions and employers from requiring all employees to join a union and pay dues if a majority votes to organize. The bill, HB 582, is sponsored by Rep. Courtney Curtis, D-Berkeley.

----- Our earlier story

File photo

When Republican Steve Tilley was speaker of the Missouri House, he flatly told fellow Republicans that he would not bring up any bills to make Missouri a "right-to-work" state.

At the time, Tilley said publicly that he viewed the issue as too divisive and potentially destructive to Missouri Republicans. He also discounted the arguments of "right-to-work" advocates who said that such a law would create jobs.

Now, the Missouri AFL-CIO has hired Tilley as a lobbyist to block this session’s "right-to-work" efforts of his successor, Speaker Tim Jones, R-Eureka.

Charlie Dooley
Provided by Mr. Dooley

This article originally appeared in the St. Louis Beacon. - Former state House Speaker Steve Tilley, R-Perryville, and prominent St. Louis businessman Doug Albrecht were among the top Republicans who headlined an event in Clayton on Thursday to raise money for St. Louis County Executive Charlie Dooley, a Democrat under siege from some within his own party.

Jason Rosenbaum, St. Louis Beacon.

Every week, St. Louis Public Radio’s Chris McDaniel joins the St. Louis Beacon’s Jo Mannies and Jason Rosenbaum to talk about the week’s politics.

File photo

Former Missouri House Speaker Steve Tilley, a Republican, donated $7,500 to Democrat Chris Koster last night. Koster has made very clear his interest in the Governor's office.

What's more, the donation comes just a few days after Koster pledged to give $400,000 to Democrats running for legislative seats in the next four years.

This Week's Politically Speaking Podcast

Nov 15, 2012

Chris McDaniel of St. Louis Public Radio joins Jo Mannies and Jason Rosenbaum of the St. Louis Beacon to discuss a few political issues.

On this week's podcast: After the GOP's lackluster performance in Missouri's statewide races, what can the party do going forward? It's early, but ballot initiatives are already in discussion for 2014. And leadership positions have now been divvied out in the Missouri legislature. How will the Republican leaders work with Democratic Governor Jay Nixon?

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Oct. 6, 2012 - Steve Tilley, who recently stepped down as speaker of the Missouri House, supports the state’s legislative term limits. The Republican optometrist from Perryville figures he would never have gotten to be speaker without it.

Missouri’s term limits, put in place by voters in 1992, swept away the tradition of state House speakers staying in office for years – even a decade or more.

Tim Jones new Missouri House Speaker

Sep 12, 2012
Tim Bommel, Mo. House Communications

Missouri House members have chosen Tim Jones (R, Eureka) as their speaker for the next few months.

Jones had served as the chamber's majority leader for the past two years. His selection Wednesday fills the vacancy created when former Speaker Steven Tilley (R, Perryville) resigned from the House in August to work as a paid consultant.  House members will decide in January whether to keep Jones for two more years as Speaker, assuming that he is re-elected in November and the GOP holds onto the Missouri House as expected.  Jones said Wednesday he wants to encourage job creation by streamlining government, offering tax relief and paring back government regulations. He also wants to focus on energy independence and education policy.

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

Updated 6:07 p.m. with comments from House Maj. Floor Leader Tim Jones.

Updated 2:32 p.m. with letter.

Updated 12:47 p.m. with details from Tilley press release.

Steven Tilley (R, Perryville) is resigning today as both a member of the Missouri House and as Speaker, effective this evening at 11:59 p.m.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Aug. 13, 2012 - Republican Steve Tilley stepped down as Missouri's speaker of the House on Monday, stating that, among other things, his incoming role as a consultant would interfere with his duties as the General Assembly’s highest-ranking Republican.

(Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio)

The Speaker of the Missouri House has thrown cold water on a scaled-back tax credit reform measure passed Wednesday by the Senate.

(Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio)

Conservative radio talk show host Rush Limbaugh was inducted into the Hall of Famous Missourians today, in a ceremony that was kept under wraps until less than an hour before it happened.

Word of the ceremony leaked out after various media members spotted Limbaugh inside the Missouri Capitol.  The ceremony was by invitation only, and the audience consisted of Republican lawmakers and family and friends.  Limbaugh told the audience that other members of his family were more deserving of the honor, but he also thanked House Speaker Steven Tilley (R, Perryville) for not rescinding it.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, May 13, 2012 - During the last few years, Missouri lawmakers have headed into the final week of the General Assembly scrambling to resolve controversies over proposed massive economic-development packages and tax credit proposals.

This time, big issues remain unresolved -- including workers' comp, charter schools, economic development. And the bills may remain unpassed when the week is over.

Location of Limbaugh bust unclear

May 8, 2012
(screen capture)

Rumors swept the Missouri Capitol that the bust of conservative radio talk show host Rush Limbaugh was being delivered today, along with the bust of former slave Dred Scott.

(Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio)

Republican leaders in the Missouri House say they’ve been negotiating with Governor Jay Nixon (D) over the two bills he vetoed last month.

The governor vetoed bills that would redefine workplace discrimination and that would place occupational disease claims solely within the workers’ compensation system House Speaker Steven Tilley (R, Perryville) says discussions have been productive, but that there’s been no compromise reached yet.

(Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio)

Around a hundred demonstrators rallied outside the State Capitol today to protest plans to induct conservative talk show host Rush Limbaugh into the Hall of Famous Missourians.

Limbaugh has come under fire for calling Georgetown University law student Sandra Fluke a “slut” and a “prostitute" on his nationally-syndicated radio program.  Fluke had testified in favor of President Obama’s birth control policies before Congressional Democrats.  Fellow Democrat and State House Member Jeanette Mott Oxford told the crowd in Jefferson City that it would be wrong for visitors to the State Capitol to see a bust of Limbaugh in the third floor Rotunda.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, March 22, 2012 A spokesman for the "Your Vote Counts" campaign confirmed Thursday night that the group is suspending its initiative petition drive aimed at making it more difficult for the Missouri General Assembly to overturn or revamp laws created by voter-approved initiatives.

Dane Waters, campaign director for Your Vote Counts, announced the campaign’s suspension in an interview late Thursday, in response to what he viewed as encouraging comments by state House Speaker Steve Tilley, R-Perryville.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, March 22, 2012 - The Missouri Bar, made up of the state’s lawyers, is coming out strongly against a legislative effort to get a proposal on this fall’s statewide ballot to change the state’s current judicial selection process to give the state Senate a role in the process.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

House Democrats are backing legislation they say would toughen Missouri’s ethics standards.

The bill would restore many provisions recently struck down by the State Supreme Court:  They include banning committee-to-committee money transfers and giving the Missouri Ethics Commission the authority to launch its own investigations.  The High Court struck them down because they were tacked onto another bill that had nothing to do with ethics.  State Rep. Tishaura Jones (D, St. Louis) says she’s filing a new bill because GOP leaders have so far done nothing following the Supreme Court ruling.

(Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio)

Missouri lawmakers have left Jefferson City for their annual spring break.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, March 6, 2012 - State House Speaker Steve Tilley says he’s sticking by his decision to commission a bust of radio commentator Rush Limbaugh for the state Capitol’s Hall of Famous Missourians, and he contends that Democratic critics are displaying their intolerance.

(via Flickr/jennlynndesign)

Radio talk show host Rush Limbaugh will be inducted this year into the Hall of Famous Missourians. The news comes as the conservative commentator is under fire for comments he made on his nationally-syndicated show last week.

Limbaugh called Georgetown University law school student Sandra Fluke a “slut” and a “prostitute” after she spoke last week before a group of congressional Democrats in favor of President Obama’s birth control mandate for religious employers.  Limbaugh has since apologized while several advertisers have left his show.  Despite the controversy, House Speaker Steven Tilley (R, Perryville) is moving forward with plans to induct Limbaugh into the Hall.

(via Flickr/david_shane)

Updated 5:21 p.m. with Gov. Nixon asking for nominees for new citizens commission

The Missouri Supreme Court has struck down new state Senate districts and ordered a further legal review of new U.S. House districts.

The rulings Tuesday add fresh uncertainty for the 2012 election year, just weeks before candidates are to begin filing for office.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Jan. 6, 2012 - Former state Sen. Jeff Smith, who lost his political career over a felony conviction, is happy to look ahead now that his probation has ended 10 months early.

"It's over, baby,'' Smith said in a email interview Friday from New York, where he now lives with his young family and teaches in a graduate program at the New School, a private university.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

Updated 3:24 p.m.

A proposal has been scrapped by Governor Jay Nixon (D) to borrow money from Missouri’s state universities to help balance the state’s budget.

The idea was floated last month, in which $106 million in reserve funds from five of Missouri’s largest universities would be used to shore up the Department of Higher Education’s budget for the next fiscal year, which begins in July.  That sparked an outcry from both university officials and lawmakers.

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