Veterans Day | St. Louis Public Radio

Veterans Day

Sheila McGlown has become an advocate for inclusion of women of color in clinical trials.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

In 2009, when Sheila McGlown began battling metastatic breast cancer at the age of 43, she was already a skilled fighter. She’d spent 25 years in the U.S. Air Force, a background she says gave her strength as well as a sense of defiance that would serve her well amid new challenges.

Ten years later, McGlown is still undergoing cancer treatment — and still focused on the service to others that she cherished during her military career. The Swansea, Illinois, resident has found a new passion for advocacy around the inclusion of women of color in clinical trials. Meanwhile, she’s also 16 months into a clinical trial participation herself.

On Monday, in light of Veterans Day, McGlown joined St. Louis on the Air host Sarah Fenske to discuss her journey.

Marissanne Lewis-Thompson | St. Louis Public Radio

A group of Florissant veterans will honor the service of the men and women in the U.S. Armed Forces on Veterans Day.

Ten members from the American Legion Florissant Valley Memorial Post 444 will perform military honors at Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. The tight-knit group is known as the honor guard. 

Military historian and former president of Dartmouth College James Wright is the author of the book "Enduring Vietnam: An American Generation and Its War." He's giving a lecture at the Missouri History Museum on Monday evening.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

Much has changed about the nature of warfare in the 100 years since the end of World War I, including the percentage of American adults who have served in the U.S. military.

“I’m of the over-75 generation, [and] 52 percent of us are veterans,” former Dartmouth College president James Wright said Monday on St. Louis on the Air. “The Vietnam generation, about 37 percent are veterans. And of course the current generation, in their 20s and early 30s, it’s about 2 percent … it’s clear which way this demographic is moving.”

In conversation with host Don Marsh, the military historian was quick to add that while it’s a relief to have far smaller percentages of the nation’s young people heading off to war, it also means that fewer and fewer Americans understand “what it is that we’re asking them to do.”

Mark Trout, president and CEO of the Missouri Civil War Museum, details the history of the Jefferson Barracks Military Post, the oldest operational military installation in the region.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

 

St. Louis is often touted as “The Gateway to the West.” But Jefferson Barracks Military Post “is that gate,” Mark Trout, president and CEO of the Missouri Civil War Museum, told host Don Marsh. On Monday’s St. Louis on the Air, Marsh and Trout discussed the history of Jefferson Barracks, its role in various wars and its cemetery.

Created in 1826, Jefferson Barracks is the oldest operational military installation in the region and was named after President Thomas Jefferson, who had died earlier that year. The historic site in south St. Louis County was strategically placed on a plateau that overlooks the Mississippi River.

Missourian John Lewis Barkley was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor for actions he took Oct. 7, 1918. This image of him is from a painting done by Howard Chandler Christy in 1930.
National World War I Museum and Memorial

It’s likely you’ve never heard of John Lewis Barkley.

The Missouri native fought in World War I, winning the Congressional Medal of Honor and later writing a book about his experience. Yet his book, “No Hard Feelings!” and his name remain in relative obscurity, even as the nation marks the 100th anniversary of World War I’s end.

That surprises Steven Trout, who helped get the book reprinted under the title “Scarlet Fields” in 2014.

“I’m astonished, in fact, and I don’t really know the reason,” he told St. Louis Public Radio.

Thomas Hoff, a museum educator with St. Louis County Parks, speaks during a wreath-laying ceremony to honor veterans at the World War I memorial in downtown Clayton on Friday. Nov. 9, 2018
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

As world leaders meet Sunday in France for a grand tribute marking the 100th anniversary of the armistice that ended World War I, a group of St. Louis area veterans will gather at a stone picnic shelter at Sylvan Springs Park in St. Louis County to solemnly call the roll of Missourians who died “over there.”

They plan to begin at 11:11 a.m. — the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month — the beginning of the ceasefire a century ago that, in effect, ended the war. Each name will be followed by the tolling of a bell.

James Petersen is a Marine veteran who shared his struggles with PTSD on Friday's St. Louis on the Air.
Kim Oswalt | St. Louis Public Radio

In honor of Veteran’s Day, local Marine veteran and Brown School of Social Work student James Petersen joined St. Louis on the Air to discuss his experience with PTSD and the work he is doing to help other veterans facing similar struggles.

Petersen, who served in Iraq, described feeling some trepidation when he decided to pursue a master’s of social work at Washington University.

“Going into the Brown School, which is definitely a liberal leaning school, school of social work, I was pretty nervous to even admit that I was a veteran,” he said.

Preservation lab technician Rebecca Thorn pieces together fragments of a fire-damaged record at the National Personnel Records Center in November 2016
Mary Delach Leonard | St. Louis Public Radio

Archivist Marta O’Neill was standing inside a warehouse-sized storage bay at the cavernous National Personnel Records Center, just off interstate 270 in north St. Louis County.

Nearly 60 million individual military personnel records are stored at the site, but this storage bay is unique. It houses only B-files: the 6.5 million records salvaged from the 1973 fire at the center’s old facility on Page Avenue. That fire destroyed the records of 18 million veterans who served in World War I, World War II and the Korean War.

St. Louis International Film Festival

Journalism movies are making a big splash this Oscars season. From “Truth,” the Robert Redford film about the Dan Rather controversy, to “Spotlight,” which follows the Boston Globe investigation of child abuse by Catholic clergy, journalists are once again the center of their own stories.

WWII B-17 Pilot: 'It Took All Of Us'

Nov 11, 2014
Amanda Honigfort

During World War II, thousands of B-17 Flying Fortress bombers took to the skies daily. The planes were a crucial part of campaigns, from the bombing of Dresden to D-Day, and were flown by the likes of Clark Gable, Jimmy Stewart and Lt. Col. Basil Hackleman.

Hackleman, who now lives in Springfield, Mo., was the original pilot of the Nine-o-Nine, a celebrated B-17 that is said to have never lost a crew member or abort a mission because of mechanical failure. The plane was scrapped after the war.

Parade grand marshalls Velma Jesse, Army WAC, Alice Anderson, Navy WAVES, and Major General Susan Davidson, commander of SDDC at Scott Air Force Base.
Camille Phillips/St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis held its annual Veterans Day Observance downtown Saturday. For the first time in 31 years, all of the parade marshals were women.

The celebration began on a solemn note with a formal ceremony in front of the Soldiers Memorial Military Museum. Bells rang and bugle taps played in memory of POWs and soldiers who went missing in action.

St. Louis Honors Veterans

Nov 11, 2013
Joseph Leahy

Salutes fired in downtown St. Louis this morning at the Soldiers Memorial Military Museum in honor of the sacrifices made by U.S. armed service members for their country. Parades, ceremonies and speeches in the St. Louis area over the three-day weekend marked the 95th anniversary of the end of WWI, known previously as Armistice Day.

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

Around 100 people turned out at the Missouri Capitol Monday to salute America's military veterans.

The crowd was a mix of veterans and civilians who not only heard about the sacrifices of the nation's older vets, but also of younger ones who served in Iraq and Afghanistan.  Retired Air Force Colonel John Clark of Columbia says it's crucial for returning soldiers, sailors, airmen and marines to retrain their minds for peace.