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Instructor Mike Pagano works with participants of Continuity's film-training program on interview techniques.
Continuity

A local nonprofit aims to attract diverse voices to participate in the local film and media-production scene.

Continuity, a nonprofit media company, is recruiting applicants for its third-annual film-training program. It prepares people of color, women, and members of other underrepresented groups for jobs in the industry. Continuity will accept applicants through the end of April.

A total of 10 participants will be selected for the one-year program, which beings in August. The free training, which takes place at Continuity's Cortex location, will teach participants a wide variety of skills, from the basics of editing to how to create non-narrative projects. The participants will also recieve a paid stipend.

John Lucas and Claudia Rankine whiteness, inc., 2016 Video projection Duration: 5:10 minutes
Provided by Pulitzer Arts Foundation

This weekend The Pulitzer Arts Foundation will display its first commissioned video poem for an exhibition. The video, titled "whiteness, inc.," critiques media presentations of whiteness as more beautiful than other skin colors.

Teen-curated exhibit examines miscommunication in technology

Jul 30, 2015
CAM Teen Museum Studies participants plan the final stages of thier exhibit
Willis Ryder Arnold | St. Louis Public Radio

Your cell phone. Skype. Email. Imagine each device as an impediment to communication, not an aid. That’s the idea behind Cole Lu’s exhibit SMELLS LIKE CONTENT at the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis.

“Most people use text messages and that’s one of those things where you don’t get a voice intonation and you don’t read body language,” said one of the show’s curators, 18-year-old Scout Sale.

New city-block sized arts compound opens in Granite City

Jul 16, 2015
Some objects found inside the newly acquired GCADD buildings will remain
Willis Ryder Arnold | St. Louis Public Radio

In Granite City, $75,000 can buy you almost an entire city block. At least if you’re an arts organization.

“This is the promised land is what it is, it’s the land of opportunity. And as much as it may sound hackneyed or trite, it’s true,” said Galen Gondolfi, founder of Fort Gondo Compound for the Arts.

William Morris
Durrie Bouscaren

When William Morris was growing up in St. Louis in the 1970s, his mother was close behind with her Super 8 camera.

Showme
Wilis Ryder Arnold

OK, we get it: publishing a video starring the cats of St. Louis Public Radio employees is completely self-indulgent. But with the Contemporary Art Museum offering its Internet Cat Video Festival July 9-10, we figured we’d better pounce on the chance.

The City & The City: Cotton Belt Freight Depot, 2015
(Courtesy of the artist and RYAN LEE, New York ©Mariam Ghani)

Mariam Ghani came to St. Louis with the idea of an already divided city.

“There’s a lot of long and complicated history that goes into making St. Louis what it is today,” Ghani said.

New Artist Showcase Comes To The Public Media Commons

Dec 2, 2014
Mitch Hill's video during Public Media Commons Artists Showcase test
Courtesy of Mike Pagano

For the first time in the Public Media Commons’ short life a group of young visual artists will display site-specific work on the main and secondary screens Tuesday night. Mike Pagano, 36, of the Nine Network helped the artists develop their projects for the space. He says the works will be a balancing act between artistic vision and accessibility.

“Kind of the tension between the artist, their vision and their voice, and what their work is traditionally about, and how to bridge that so that it fits with a space that’s accessible to everyone,” Pagano said. 

Meow! Want To Watch Cat Videos? Head To The Museum

Jul 18, 2014
Provided by CAM

Cat videos have become the glue that holds the Internet together. Will the Internet Cat Video Festival have the same stickiness for museums?

The Contemporary Art Museum of St. Louis is hosting the two-day festival July 18-19, featuring cat-themed activities and, of course, videos. Both days are sold out.

Provided by CAM

Felines are fickle subjects when it comes to video (and almost everything else).

The reclusive stars that rule my home scoff at commands to do something cute for the camera. Plus, their 23-hour-a-day sleep schedule leaves only a small window for any possible action shots of bathing, eating or chasing the elusive red dot. What would Frank Capra do?

Mo. bill criminalizes undercover videos at farms

Apr 17, 2012
(via Wikimedia Commons)

The Missouri House has endorsed legislation seeking to make it a crime for undercover activists to produce videos portraying poor conditions at agricultural facilities.

The legislation given first-round approval Tuesday would create the crime of "agriculture production facility interference." The crime would apply to people who produce or distribute photos, videos or audio recordings of the activities at an agricultural facility without the consent of the owner.

Ill. high court says police must keep videos for misdemeanors

Dec 30, 2011
(via Flickr/smays)

The Illinois Supreme Court has ruled that police must preserve video evidence in all cases, even misdemenors.

The court upheld sanctions today in a case where police erased video of a drunken driving arrest. The defendant told prosecutors she intended to fight the charges and wanted the video, but police still followed their policy of destroying videos after 30 days.

St. Louis police say video of beating concerning

Jan 4, 2011

Video contains adult language, viewer discretion advised.

UPDATED: 4:21 p.m. Jan. 4, 2011

You may have heard about a video of a St. Louis city police officer using his nightstick to beat a man. The video is available for you to watch above.

For a few hours this afternoon, the video was removed from YouTube under its "shocking and disgusting content" policy and has since been re-activated.

According to the Associated Press, police said in a statement Tuesday that while the circumstances are not yet known, the video is disturbing. Police say they have not yet identified the officer, but he will be placed on administrative duty once identified, until the investigation is complete.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Nov. 29, 2010 - I ventured to my childhood home over Thanksgiving. As my trips surrounding holidays tend to, this one included time spent with friends made in high school.

Now scattered throughout the country, our group is doing things so varied it doesn't seem possible our common background could have adequately prepared each of us. Our conversation turned to those "good old days," absent friends and former teachers.