Wally Siewert | St. Louis Public Radio

Wally Siewert

From left, Wesley Bell, Cristina Garmendia and Wally Siewert joined Wednesday's talk show.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

With the Better Together proposal that had sought to consolidate much of St. Louis City and County government now no longer up for consideration, what’s next for the region, especially when it comes to addressing racial equity issues?

FOCUS St. Louis is asking this question and more at a free event sponsored by the organization this Thursday evening at the Missouri History Museum. Titled Equity in City/County Reform: Political Representation and Criminal Justice, the gathering will bring together a variety of speakers from both city and county.

Protesters are greeted by lines of state and county police during a demonstration march on the Ferguson police station on August 11, 2014.
Bill Greenblatt | UPI

An upcoming conference on Ferguson has promised “not to re-litigate the past,” but organizers instead hope to draw lessons for the future on both the rights of protesters and the difficult job that police officers face when they put on their uniforms each day. “The Ethics of Ferguson – Policing, Prosecuting, and Protesting” is the name of the conference, which will take place at Harris-Stowe State University on Friday, Nov. 20.

Wikipedia

Political dysfunction has been bandied about for several years, but its meaning remains unclear. That’s the first order of business Friday at the Political Ethics Conference at the University of Missouri–St. Louis.

“One of the reasons that we decided to do the conference was precisely because everyone complains about political dysfunction, but you ask five different people what it is and you’ll get five different answers,” Wally Siewert, director of UMSL’s Center for Ethics in Public Life, told “St. Louis on the Air” host Don Marsh on Thursday.

Commentary: Is political ethics an oxymoron?

May 20, 2013

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: UMSL’s Center for Ethics in Public Life opened its doors 18 months ago, and as I was introducing myself as its new director, I began to notice a trend. In every new meeting the idea of "ethics for politicians" provoked a knowing smile and a sad shake of the head and a comment like: “Is that an oxymoron?” Or “Well you’ve certainly got your work cut out for you.”