William Tisaby | St. Louis Public Radio

William Tisaby

St. Louis Circuit Attorney Kim Gardner speaks to news reporters on July 11, 2019.
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis Circuit Attorney Kim Gardner says she acted appropriately when her office decided in 2018 to charge former Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens with a felony.

“I steadfastly maintain that all of my actions were both legal and ethical, pertaining to my investigation or my decision to charge the former governor,” Gardner said Thursday at a news conference where she was surrounded by more than a dozen political and religious supporters. 

KCUR's Brian Ellison (left) and St. Louis Public Radio's Rachel Lippmann joined Friday's talk show to talk about multiple top news stories of the week.
Brian Ellison & St. Louis Public Radio

On Friday’s St. Louis on the Air, guest host Jim Kirchherr of the Nine Network went behind the headlines to discuss multiple top news stories of the week.

St. Louis Public Radio reporter Rachel Lippmann first joined the program to touch on the future of Missouri’s only abortion clinic. Missouri’s health department has denied a license renewal for the clinic. Planned Parenthood of St. Louis will still be able to continue performing the procedure for now, according to a court order.

And, earlier this week, a former FBI agent who was hired to help with the investigation into former Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens was himself charged. Investigator William Tisaby was indicted on seven felony counts that included multiple perjury charges.

Booking photo of William Tisaby June 17, 2019
Provided | St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department

Updated at 4 p.m., June 18 with calls from Gardner's supporters to end the gag order on the case. — A former FBI agent hired by St. Louis Circuit Attorney Kim Gardner to help in the criminal investigation of then-Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens is now facing charges himself.

A grand jury indictment made public on Monday charged William Tisaby with seven felony counts, including multiple perjury charges. His conduct during the investigation was a factor in prosecutors dropping the felony invasion of privacy charge against the governor.

St. Louis Circuit Attorney Kim Gardner takes the oath of office at the Old Courthouse on January 6, 2017.
File photo | Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

When Kim Gardner was running for St. Louis Circuit Attorney, she vowed change “by reforming a broken system.”

After the Michael Brown shooting, voters warmed to her message of rebuilding trust in the criminal justice system. She promised to reduce violent crime in the city. She also promised to increase diversity, to conduct fair and complete investigations in police shootings, reduce racial disparities and increase gun control.

Voters liked what they heard, and Gardner became the first African American woman elected to the city office.

But her nearly two-and-a-half-year tenure has been a roller coaster ride.

Gerard Carmody has been named a special prosecutor to investigate allegations of perjury associated with the prosecution of the Eric Greitens criminal case.
Carmody MacDonald

A St. Louis judge on Friday named a local attorney to oversee the investigation into a former FBI agent who worked with prosecutors on the Eric Greitens case.

Judge Michael Mullen agreed with the city that Circuit Attorney Kim Gardner had a conflict of interest when it came to the agent, William Tisaby, and appointed a special prosecutor. The St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department is investigating allegations that Tisaby lied under oath, and Gardner is a potential witness.

St. Louis circuit attorney Kim Gardner announces on May 30, 2018, that her office will drop a felony computer-tampering charge against Gov. Eric Greitens.
File photo | Rachel Lippmann | St. Louis Public Radio

Gov. Eric Greitens’ resignation was part of an agreement reached with prosecutors to dismiss charges that the governor misused a charity donor list during his campaign.

Judge Rex Burlison on Wednesday accepted the deal reached between St. Louis Circuit Attorney Kim Gardner and attorneys for Greitens. The state will not be able to refile the computer tampering charge, but the agreement has no bearing on the decision of a special prosecutor, Jean Peters Baker, whether to refile invasion of privacy charges. The governor could also face other state or federal charges.

Civil Courts building, St. Louis
File photo | Rachel Heidenry

St. Louis Circuit Judge Rex Burlison has rejected a media request to record audio during the felony trial of Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens.

Burlison ruled Wednesday that still photography would be allowed for the first 10 minutes of the first day of trial, which is scheduled for Monday. He had previously rejected video recording of the trial, although it will be broadcast into an overflow courtroom for media and the public.

The Carnahan Courthouse is one of two courthouses in the 22nd Judicial Circuit, which is the city of St. Louis
File photo | Rachel Lippmann | St. Louis Public Radio

Attorneys for Gov. Eric Greitens want a St. Louis circuit judge to throw out almost all the evidence prosecutors have in the felony invasion of privacy case against him.

A computer glitch had kept the documents from being accessed publicly until Wednesday. Reporters were allowed to review them in the courthouse but could not print copies.

Attorney Al Watkins speaks with reporters outside the Carnahan Courthouse in downtown St. Louis following a hearing. March 26, 2018.
File photo I Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

The publisher of a political newspaper delivered $50,000 in cash to the attorney of a key witness in Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens’ felony invasion of privacy case.

While the source of that money wasn’t disclosed in court on Monday, Greitens’ attorney noted Scott Faughn’s connections to an interest group that the governor greatly upset.

Gov. Eric Greitens' defense team outside the Carnahan Courthouse in downtown St. Louis following a hearing. March 26, 2018.
File photo I Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

An investigator who interviewed several witnesses in Gov. Eric Greitens' invasion of privacy case will have to show up to be re-deposed on Thursday.

A judge also ruled that an attorney who represents a key figure in the case can't also be that investigator's attorney.