St. Louis on the Air | St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis on the Air

Noon-1 p.m. and 10-11 p.m. (repeat) Monday-Friday
  • Local Host Don Marsh

St. Louis on the Air creates a unique space where guests and listeners can share ideas and opinions with respect and honesty. Whether exploring issues and challenges confronting our region, discussing the latest innovations in science and technology, taking a closer look at our history or talking with authors, artists and musicians, St. Louis on the Air brings you the stories of St. Louis and the people who live, work and create in our region.

St. Louis on the Air brings you the stories of St. Louis and the people who live, work and create in our region. St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh and producers Mary EdwardsAlex HeuerEvie Hemphill and Lara Hamdan give you the information you need to make informed decisions and stay in touch with our diverse and vibrant St. Louis region.

This interview will be on "St. Louis on the Air" at noon on Thursday; this story will be updated after the show. You can listen live.

On Thursday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh will talk with Missouri Auditor Nicole Galloway.

Galloway began an audit of the City of St. Louis earlier this year, a process that’s expected to take a few years. We’ll get an update on that audit and other issues under Galloway’s purview.

Visiting Nurse Association of Greater St. Louis’ Carol Emmerich (left) and Mike Roberts (right) talked about how people can deal with feelings of grief.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

When a person nears the end of their life, feelings of grief can increase and unaddressed matters often add to the complications.

On Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh talked about how people can deal with those issues. Visiting Nurse Association of Greater St. Louis’ Mike Roberts, public relations and communications manager, and Carol Emmerich, director of hospice care, joined him for the conversation.

J Street founder Jeremy Ben-Ami (left) and Rabbi Jim Bennett (right) talked about being “pro-Israel and pro-peace” in the 21st century.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

There is a divide in the fundamental beliefs among supporters of Israel regarding the future of the Israel-Palestine conflict. For Jeremy Ben-Ami, pursuit of peace is something he considers critical to the security and survival of the State of Israel in the 21st century.

On Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh talked with the J Street president about his organization and his appearance this week at Congregation Shaare Emeth. Rabbi Jim Bennett also joined the conversation about being “pro-Israel and pro-peace.” 

This interview will be on "St. Louis on the Air" over the noon hour on Thursday; this story will be updated after the show. You can listen live.

Saint Louis University High School sophomore Bryce Van Bree (at left), music director Jeff Pottinger (center) and senior Emanuel Parker discussed what the serendipitous experience was like on Tuesday’s show.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

Last week, Jeff Pottinger and his band of 40-some Saint Louis University High School students were enjoying a trip they knew they’d remember for years to come when it suddenly became exponentially more unforgettable.

They were partway through a musical performance just outside St. Peter’s Basilica in the Vatican when Pope Francis himself approached the group, listened to them play, then talked with them and even took a few selfies with the teens.

“Magical” is one word that Pottinger used to sum up the experience while discussing it on Tuesday’s St. Louis on the Air with host Don Marsh.

Ken Cooper (left) and Bing Dempewolf (right) talked about different ways to address and prevent sexual harassment in the workplace.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

Even with more awareness and updated policies surrounding the issue of sexual harassment, offensive advances and interactions in the workplace have not gone away. But have employers overlooked other ways to deal with the matter?

Ken Cooper, corporate trainer and author of "Stop It Now: How Targets and Managers Can End Sexual Harassment," thinks so. He said workplaces need to address the matter beyond the legal ramifications and introduce behavioral trainings once.

Students at Maplewood Richmond Heights remember the victims of the Feb. 14 school shooting in Parkland, Florida.
File Photo| Ryan Delaney | St. Louis Public Radio

Since the fatal shooting of students in Florida in February, many young activists have organized walkouts, rallies and calls to action. On March 24, young people all over the country will take to the streets again in a nationwide rally they’re calling “March For Our Lives.”

On Monday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh talked with local students involved in myriad causes they are passionate about to discuss youth’s role in activism.

Josephine Baker, who grew up in the Mill Creek Valley neighborhood and lived much of her adult life in France, is the focus of an episode of “The Nod.”
Jac. de Nijs | Dutch National Archives

Josephine Baker is remembered for being many different things over the course of her remarkable life – a burlesque performer, a film actress, an activist, even a war hero. Less well known is the St. Louis-born celebrity’s role as a mother to 12 ethnically diverse children she began adopting in the 1950s as her “rainbow tribe.”

Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens is in political limbo after being indicted for felony invasion of privacy charges.
Carolina Hidalgo I St. Louis Public Radio

On the latest edition of the Politically Speaking podcast, St. Louis Public Radio’s Jason Rosenbaum, Jo Mannies and Rachel Lippmann round up this week’s legal and political news surrounding Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens.

This week’s episodes focuses on how the governor’s allies and adversaries are trying to alter public opinion in the run up to his felony invasion of privacy trial on May 14.

Most Broadway actors relax on their Monday days off. But on Monday, April 16, "Hamilton" star Mandy Gonzalez will come to St. Louis to help raise awareness and funds for St. Louis’ december Magazine. She stars as Angelica Schuyler in the Broadway hit.

On Friday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh talked with Gonzalez about her career and upcoming performance in St. Louis, as well as with Gianna Jacobsen, the publisher of december Magazine, a non-profit literary journal headquartered in St. Louis.

Several Missouri school districts arm their employees to prevent mass shootings. More schools in the state are considering it following a school shooting last month.
David Kovaluk | St. Louis Public Radio

Glenwood Elementary School sits along a state highway between West Plains and the Arkansas border, in far south-central Missouri. If the school has an emergency, the Howell County Sheriff’s Department is more than 10 minutes away.

Superintendent Wayne Stewart said it’s a situation that makes the district of 240 students especially vulnerable if a shooter ever attacked.

“Very likely, the deed would be done by the time emergency responders got here,” he said.

“The Pirates of Penzance” will drop anchor at the Blanche M. Touhill Performing Arts Center on Friday. As they do so, they’ll have Mark Hanna, the very model of a modern pirate expert, accompanying them on stage.

The University of California San Diego faculty member is in town to give pre-show talks throughout the weekend as a University of Missouri–St. Louis cast of singing seadogs, star-crossed lovers and mermaids perform the humorous Gilbert and Sullivan opera.

He also joined St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh on Thursday for a conversation all about pirates – those that sailed the seas centuries ago and in more contemporary times.

St. Louis residents and community leaders (from left) Kevin McKinney, Al Willis and Sal Martinez discussed the goals of the Neighborhoods United for Change initiative.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

It takes less than 20 minutes to drive between the Lewis Place and Holly Hills neighborhoods in St. Louis. Yet that relatively short trip from north to south  – or vice versa – is one that many people in the Gateway region are unlikely to take.

That’s according to Lewis Place resident Al Willis, who took a bus tour of Holly Hills along with a group of his neighbors in an effort to bridge economic, racial and geographic divides around the region. A contingent of Holly Hills residents participated in a tour of Lewis Place on the same day, and for both groups the experience proved eye-opening.

(L-R) Sisters Kathleen Hughes, Jackie Toben and Barbara McMullen discussed the history and work of the 15 orders of Catholic Sisters in the St. Louis region.
Lara Hamdan | St. Louis Public Radio

As National Catholic Sisters Week wraps up, host Don Marsh discussed the history and work of the 15 orders of Catholic Sisters in the St. Louis region on Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air. Their work ranges from working with incarcerated women to children in shelters and elders.

Joining the discussion were Sisters Barbara McMullen, Kathleen Hughes and Jackie Toben to talk about their work in the Catholic community and clarify their roles as sisters. 

Sharing America editor Holly Edgell and reporter Ashley Lisenby talk with Don Marsh on St. Louis on the Air on March 14, 2018.
David Kovaluk | St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis Public Radio is taking the lead in a new public radio initiative called Sharing America.

Funded by a grant from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB), Sharing America includes reporters at public radio stations in four cities and an editor based in St. Louis.

The collaboration covers the intersection of race, identity and culture. Holly Edgell, the editor of Sharing America, along with reporter Ashley Lisenby were guests Wednesday on St. Louis on the Air.

Tuesday’s conversation touched on the now (in)famous concrete spheres that line Compton Avenue as well as other traffic-calming efforts in the region.
Kae Petrin | St. Louis Public Radio

Kea Wilson has heard her share of complaints about the so-called “Ingrassia balls” recently installed in her south city neighborhood along Compton Avenue.

Some people worry about the concrete spheres being hit by vehicles and rolling down the street, as several in fact have. But Wilson, director of community engagement for the organization Strong Towns, said on Tuesday’s St. Louis on the Air that there’s a more serious issue at stake.

Missouri Historical Society’s president and CEO, Frances Levine (right), and managing director of education and visitor experience, Nick Hoffman (left) talked about the organization's rebranding efforts.
Lara Hamdan | St. Louis Public Radio

In Nov. 2015, the Missouri History Museum acquired the Soldiers Memorial downtown and embarked on a massive renovation project. As the project nears completion, the organization has rebranded itself as the Missouri Historical Society, operating the Missouri History Museum, the Library & Research Center and the Soldiers Memorial Military Museum, set to reopen in Nov. 3, 2018.

On Tuesday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh talked with leaders of the Missouri Historical Society (MHS) about recent changes at the institution, including the rebranding initiative and expansion efforts.

U.S. Army veterans (from left) Emily Staden, Jim Craig and Angie Peacock discussed their experiences and observations of trends in the military, at home and in higher education.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

Women make up 14 percent of the U.S. military as well as a full quarter of the veterans who are pursuing a college education upon returning home from service. In the St. Louis area alone, evidence of their significant presence isn’t hard to come by.

On Monday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh talked with three local Army veterans about that growing force and about how St. Louis’ student veterans are collaborating as they plan for this year’s Student Veterans Week festivities set to begin March 17.

Sunrise, Daylight Saving Time
Matthias Bachmann | Flickr |

Updated 3/12/18, originally broadcast 3/10/16

Love it or hate it, Daylight Saving Time began over the weekend. Across the country, people lost an hour of sleep in exchange for longer days through the summer. Is it worth it?

Gov. Eric Greitens speaks to reporters at Chesed Shel Emeth Cemetery on Feb. 22, 2017.
File photo I Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

As Gov. Eric Greitens’ legal and political future continues to dominate the headlines, Politically Speaking is launching a standalone show detailing the developments in the Missouri chief executive’s saga.

St. Louis Public Radio’s political reporters will discuss what’s going on in court, the Missouri General Assembly and the electoral arena with the governor’s case. We’ll also answer your questions about the situation.