St. Louis on the Air | St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis on the Air

Noon-1 p.m. and 10-11 p.m. (repeat) Monday-Friday
  • Local Host Don Marsh

St. Louis on the Air creates a unique space where guests and listeners can share ideas and opinions with respect and honesty. Whether exploring issues and challenges confronting our region, discussing the latest innovations in science and technology, taking a closer look at our history or talking with authors, artists and musicians, St. Louis on the Air brings you the stories of St. Louis and the people who live, work and create in our region.

St. Louis on the Air brings you the stories of St. Louis and the people who live, work and create in our region. St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh and producers Mary EdwardsAlex HeuerEvie Hemphill and Lara Hamdan give you the information you need to make informed decisions and stay in touch with our diverse and vibrant St. Louis region.

File photo | Marshall Griffin | St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri Republicans are split over what to do about Gov. Eric Greitens, a fellow Republican who’s been indicted for felony invasion of privacy after allegedly taking a semi-nude photo of a woman without her consent.

The state Republican Party contends that the indictment is “a political hit job’’ engineered by St. Louis Circuit Attorney Kim Gardner, a Democrat.

But there are increasing calls from GOP lawmakers, especially in the state Senate, for Greitens to at least consider stepping down.

This segment will be on "St. Louis on the Air" at noon on Monday. This story will be updated after the show. You can listen live.

Longtime St. Louis meteorologist Cindy Preszler now runs WeatherSTL.com.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

Despite a warming world, there’s little chance of weather becoming unpredictable – or at least less predictable than it already is. That’s according to new research from the University of Missouri’s School of Natural Resources.

On Friday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh spoke with local meteorologist Cindy Preszler about the findings – along with Anthony Lupo, a professor of atmospheric science who helped lead the study.

Wayne Pratt | St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis-based Centene Corporation found itself in a precarious situation this week when a BuzzFeed News investigation uncovered that a troubled compounding pharmacy the company now owns sold drugs used in executions to the state of Missouri.

(L-R) Paul Crane, Irene Augustin and Cynthia Duffe talked about the issue of homelessness in St. Louis and the new local film "Living in Tents" portrayal of it.
Lara Hamdan | St. Louis Public Radio

Filmmaker Paul Crane didn’t know much about homelessness until he happened across a tent city while walking around taking pictures in downtown St. Louis.

The blue tarps set up along the Mississippi riverfront sparked Crane’s curiosity and eventually led him to direct the documentary, "Living in Tents.”

On Thursday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh talked about the new documentary film, which features the stories of homeless people in St. Louis and more broadly, the issue of homelessness in St. Louis.

The Missouri Capitol building.
File photo | St. Louis Public Radio

On Thursday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh discussed the potential impact of House Bill 2179. It would prohibit Missouri from entering into contracts over $10,000 with companies that engage in the boycott of, divestment from and sanctioning of Israel, an ally of the United States.

Kristen Goodman performs her original song 'I’m Ready' for the NPR Tiny Desk Concert in January 2017.
Kristen Goodman via YouTube

Updated Feb. 21 with St. Louis on the Air conversation about contest starting  Tiny Desk Contest is now live! Use this entry form to enter, and tag your entry with #TinyDeskSTL so we can share it here in the St. Louis area. Good luck, Tiny Desk musicians.

Calling all St. Louis musicians: The 2018 Tiny Desk Contest from NPR Music officially begins Feb. 20.

You may submit a video of you or your band playing an original song behind a desk — any desk — and you could win a chance to play your own Tiny Desk Concert at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., before embarking on a nationwide tour. The winner will also appear at a taping of NPR’s "Ask Me Another." Submissions are due March 25.

Eastern Reception Diagnostic and Corrections Center in Bonne Terre, Missouri.
File photo | Willis Ryder Arnold | St. Louis Public Radio

Updated Feb. 21 with St. Louis on the Air conversation with reporter Chris McDaniel

Original story from Feb. 20 — A BuzzFeed News investigation has found that a St. Louis-area compounding pharmacy with a troubled safety history has provided execution drugs to the state of Missouri for the last four years.

Sources told BuzzFeed News reporter Chris McDaniel that Foundation Care, based in Earth City, supplied the drugs for 17 executions since February 2014. Foundation Care denied its participation in executions to McDaniel, and did not respond to requests for comment from St. Louis Public Radio.

Culinary professionals Alex Feick (at left) and Josh Charles (center) joined Sauce Magazine editor Catherine Klene to talk about how they manage demanding careers alongside parenthood and other aspects of their lives.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

Like many new parents, Josh Charles sensed that a major switch had been flipped the moment his baby was born 11 months ago. He knew right away that the days ahead would look different for him, professionally speaking, than the previous decade he’d spent cooking in fine-dining kitchens.

“The typical restaurant hours were just something that I could not do anymore,” the chef said this week on St. Louis on the Air. “I had been used to working Tuesday through Sunday, 10 a.m. to 11 p.m. at minimum, and I just knew that being locked into that restaurant wasn’t going to be cohesive for the hours that I needed to be there for my family.”

(L-R) Nicole Roach, Catrina Salama and Kenneth Pruitt talked about recognizing unconscious bias, how to manage it and how that can help further understanding and inclusion.
Lara Hamdan | St. Louis Public Radio

Workplaces and institutions are implementing un-bias trainings to promote inclusivity. According to Kenneth Pruitt, director of diversity training at Diversity Awareness Partnership (DAP), training without follow-ups or contextualization can backfire.

The prolific author and TV and radio host will speak at 8 p.m. Feb. 20 at Powell Hall.
Rick Steves’ Europe

With more than 50 guidebooks to his name, Rick Steves is a go-to authority on international travel – particularly when it comes to Europe. But whether one’s destination is Italy or India, his main piece of advice is to travel thoughtfully.

“You just have to decide,” Steves said in a St. Louis on the Air interview just prior to his Feb. 20 visit to the Gateway City as part of the St. Louis Speakers Series. “Do you want to lie on the beach with a bunch of other Americans, or do you want to actually get out into the local culture and check things out?”

Washington University history professor Peter Kastor uses the musical "Hamilton" as a jumping-off point to teach about the Founding Fathers.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

It’s no secret that there’s a renewed interest in the role Alexander Hamilton played in founding the United States.

Portrayed in the Broadway musical “Hamilton,” the nation’s first treasury secretary and many of the Founding Fathers are brought to life by the show’s creator and star, Lin-Manuel Miranda.

In advance of the musical’s sold-out run in April at the Fox Theatre in St. Louis, St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh talked with Peter Kastor, history professor at Washington University, about the historical accuracy of “Hamilton.”

Painter Junius Brutus Stearns, 1856 / via Wikimedia Commons

Encore Presentation: This program's original broadcast was on March 19, 2013.

Having existed and endured for nearly 230 years, the U.S. Constitution and the intent of those who created it continues to be a hotly contested topic.

On Monday's St. Louis on the Air during President's Day, host Don Marsh revisited his 2013 discussion with David Robertson, author of the book "The Original Compromise: What the Constitution's Framers Were Really Thinking." Robertson is a Curators' Teaching Professor of Political Science at the University of Missouri-St. Louis.

Nurses for Newborns chief executive officer Melinda Ohlemiller talked about the organization's continued efforts to provide perinatal services to at-risk families.
Lara Hamdan | St. Louis Public Radio

For more than two decades, Nurses for Newborns have stepped in to help more than 100,000 families lacking in resources to care for their newborn babies.

On Friday's St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh talked about services provided by Nurses for Newborns to provide a safety net and improve the outcomes of at-risk infants. Joining him for the discussion was Nurses for Newborns chief executive officer Melinda Ohlemiller.

Listen to the full discussion about the organization’s mission and services:

Alderwoman-elect Rice and Vivian Eveloff, director of the Sue Shear Institute for Women in Public Life at the University of Missouri-St. Louis discussed the increase in the number of women in elected offices.
Lara Hamdan | St. Louis Public Radio

On Friday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh discussed the special election to replace the St. Louis 8th ward alderman. Joining him for the discussion were St. Louis Public Radio reporters Rachel Lippmann and Jason Rosenbaum.

via Saint Raphael the Archangel Catholic Church

The mother of a south St. Louis woman believed to have shot her infant, her husband and herself earlier this month says that her daughter suffered from postpartum depression.

“There’s no doubt about it,” Polly Fick told St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh on Thursday when asked if her daughter had postpartum depression. “But because of her background and working as a social worker, I think she was of the opinion that she could handle things.”

(L-R) Brian Elsesser, Bob Lawrence and Robert "Tuffy" Brandon talked about a show at the Link Auditorium highlighting blues music in St. Louis.
Lara Hamdan | St. Louis Public Radio

On Thursday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh talked about a St. Louis themed variety show featuring blues music, comedy and discussions about life in a divided city.

Joining the discussion were:

Classical musicians (from left) Terrance Patterson, Ann Hobson Pilot and Demarre McGill discussed the presence of African-Americans in the genre and how they’ve seen that presence slowly grow over the course of their careers.
Lara Hamdan | St. Louis Public Radio

Fewer than 2 percent of musicians in professional orchestras in the U.S. are African-American, and the Florida-based Ritz Chamber Players are eager to change that.

On Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air, three members of the all-black ensemble talked with host Don Marsh about the presence of African-Americans in the genre and how they’ve seen that presence slowly grow over the course of their careers.

Cynthia Prost, Quinton Ward and Antionette Carroll talked about how elements of design can address societal issues.
Lara Hamdan | St. Louis Public Radio

Encouraging young people and addressing racial equity are the tenets of Creative Reaction Lab’s (CRL) mission to create youth leaders that impact and shape their community’s future and design.

David Cunningham, a professor of sociology at Washington University, discussed the recent slowdown in the growth of hate groups in the U.S. as well as the concurrent increase in the number of hate crimes occurring in the country since November 2016.
Alex Heuer | St. Louis Public Radio

Nearly doubling since 1999, the long-growing number of hate groups active within the United States has remained nearly static since the election of President Donald Trump. Meanwhile, the number of hate crimes is rising, and at first glance the two concurrent trends might seem contradictory.

On Tuesday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh talked to Washington University sociologist David Cunningham to help make sense of the data.

Amanda Clark (left) and Elizabeth Eikmann talked about Renegade STL's event highlighting notable stories of love and loss in St. Louis history.
Lara Hamdan | St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis has a history that involves grand stories of love – and loss. Renegade STL will “celebrate” those stories at an upcoming event at the Novel Neighbor on Feb. 14.

On Tuesday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh discussed interesting and obscure love and breakup stories that happened in St. Louis with Renegade STL. Joining the discussion were the organization’s founder Amanda Clark and business partner Elizabeth Eikmann.

Shrimp from Peppe’s Apt. 2 restaurant.
Carmen Troesser | Sauce Magazine

In our monthly Sound Bites segment in partnership with Sauce Magazine, St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh discussed tips for where to dine on Valentine's Day as well as what home cooks can do. Joining him for the discussion were Sauce Magazine’s managing editor Heather Hughes and art director Meera Nagarajan.

Scaffolding borders large interpretive floor art that traces the paths explorers and pioneers took westward from St. Louis.
Alex Heuer | St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh on Monday talked about renovations taking place at the Gateway Arch in advance of a planned reopening date of July 3.

Joining the discussion was Ryan McClure, director of communications and activation at the Gateway Arch Park Foundation. St. Louis on the Air producer Alex Heuer also joined the conversation.

Tenor Scott Kennebeck auditions at Powell Hall for the chance to perform the national anthem at a St. Louis Blues game.
Alex Heuer | St. Louis Public Radio

Scott Kennebeck’s career as a singer is inextricably linked to his faith. The tenor is executive director of St. Louis Cathedral Concerts and he is the cantor at the Cathedral Basilica of St. Louis.

On Friday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh talked with Kennebeck about his multi-faceted career and the various audiences he’s performed for – ranging from Pope John Paul II’s St. Louis visit, a papal mass at St. Peter’s Basilica in Rome to a St. Louis Blues game.

Philip Barnes (left) and Francis Pott (right) talked about the St. Louis Chamber Chorus' concert highlighting the theme of love.
Mary Edwards | St. Louis Public Radio

The St. Louis Chamber Chorus' will explore the human condition at a performance commemorating Valentine’s Day. The concert is highlighted by the world premiere of "Ardor Amis," a work the chorus commissioned from British composer Francis Pott.

Pott joined St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh alongside Philip Barnes, artistic director of the St. Louis Chamber Chorus, for Friday’s segment to talk about the concert.

Listen to the full discussion:

The Illinois State Capitol in Springfield.
File photo | Seth Perlman | Associated Press

The state of Illinois’ general primary elections are set to take place on March 20, 2018.

On Friday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh went Behind the Headlines to discuss the Illinois governor’s race and other political issues in the state. Joining him for the discussion was WWTW “Chicago Tonight” correspondent Amanda Vinciky to talk about campaign specifics.

KSDK news anchor Rene Knott is in South Korea covering the 2018 Winter Olympics.

On Thursday’s St. Louis on the Air, producer Alex Heuer talked with Knott about the highlights of his trip thus far. The biggest thing that stuck out to Knott was his visit to the Demilitarized Zone (DMZ), a 2.5 mile wide border across the peninsula that separates North and South Korea.

The Olympic Games are historic festivals that showcase a wide variety of athletic talent – but they also go beyond sports entertainment.

On Thursday’s St. Louis on the Air, producer Alex Heuer talked to UMSL professor Susan Brownell, who is attending the Olympics in South Korea and plans to study them from an anthropological point of view.

Start of the 1904 Olympic Marathon Race.
Missouri Historical Society

The St. Louis Sports Commission (SLSC) announced that the International Olympic Committee (IOC) is granting each city that has hosted the games the chance to display two grand sculptures of the Olympic rings. St. Louis is among those cities and was even the first city in the United States to host the historic athletic competition.

 Heart expert Dr. Andrew Kates explains topics relating to heart health.
Lara Hamdan | St. Louis Public Radio

The heart is a familiar symbol of love, but the diseases of the organ can kill. February is Heart Health Month, and we invited our heart expert Dr. Andrew Kates, professor of medicine and cardiologist with the Washington University Heart Care Institute at Barnes-Jewish Hospital, back on the program to help explain the matters of the heart.

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